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SATURDAY, JULY 10, 1920 







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MBluejay 

Ends Corns 

Quickly 

Liquid or Plaster 



LI- 




RUG STORE 



Don't pass by 

And let that corn keep hurting 



Don't pass a drugstore that sells Blue-jay if 
you ever suffer corns. 

Blue-jay stops the corn pain. A simple touch 
applies it. And soon the toughest corn will 
loosen and ccme out. 

The Blue-jay way is gentle, easy. sure. It 
comes in plaster or in liquid form. 

It is scientific — a product of this world-famed 
laboratory. 



Millions now employ it. Most of the corns 
that develop are being ended by it. 

Compare it with old methods, harsh and 
uncertain. Learn what folly it is to merely pare 
and pad corns. 

Use Blue-jay on one corn tonight. Watch 
that corn go. Then remember that every corn 
can thus be ended the moment it appears. A 
weel-old corn should be unknown in these days. 



Blue=jay 

Plaster or Liquid 
he Scientific Corn Ender 




BAUER & BLACK Chicago New York Toronto 

• . •■- >■■ , . - - ... r , 



Telephone Sutter 6654 



Importers 



GEO. W, GASWELL GO, 

COFFEE AND TEA 

Spices. Baking Powder, Flavoring 

Extracts 

442-452 Second Street, San Francisco 



For that stubborn cough 
Use Old Snake Doctor's Cough Remedy 

SNAKE DRUG CO. 

Formerly G. Leipnitz & Co. 

Now Located at 

127-129 KEARNY ST. 



MacRORiE - McLaren co. 

FLORISTS. NURSERYMEN 

and 
LANDSCAPE ENGINEERS 

141 Powell S^rettj •Sah : Franclsio j 

Nurseries:* '9an - Mater? 
Phone S^n Mateo ^02 . ... 
Phone Dou^js^j^'-.a'iilt jiiljce jHolel; 



A. \V. BEST 



ALICE BEST 



BEST'S 

ART SCHOOL 

1625 California Street 

Life Classes — Day and Night 

Illustrating Sketching Painting 



TIRES VULCANIZING 

THOMAS H. ELKINGTON 

Distributor for 

Kelly-Springfield Tires 

Long Mileage Tires and Second Hand Tires 

865 POST ST.. Near Hyde 

Phone PROSPECT 1566 




FIREPROOF 

STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1636 Market St. 

Bet. Franklin and Gough 
Tel. Park 271 San Francisco 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



Bank of New South Wales 



( 


ESTABLISHED 1817) 






<f&&A 


$20,000,000.00 




16,000,000.00 


Reserve Liability of Pro- 


20,000,000.00 








$56,000,000.00 


Sept. 1919 


$335,181,247.00 



SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E., Genera! Manager 

340 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian Stales, New Zealand. Fiji, Papua (New 

Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australian Banking 

Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Aranged. 

Head Office: London Office: 

GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 2 

Agents: 
Bank of California, National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'! Bank, Crocker Nat'l Bank 



.Direct Foreign Banking 1 Service 

Importers and exporters employing the facilities of our Foreign Deparlment incur none 
'» of the risks incident to inexperience or untried theory in the handling of their overseas 

» transactions. 

For many years we have provided Direct Service reaching ail the important money 
and commercial centers of the civilized world. 

The excellence of that service is evidenced by its preference and employment by rep- 
resentative concerns at the East and other banking centers throughout the United States. 

RESOURCES OVER ONE HUNDRED TWENTY MILLION DOLLARS 

THE ANGLO & LONDON-PARIS NATIONAL BANK 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 

STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and at LONDON. ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE. 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Manager W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

Member of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement and 7lh Avenue 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

DECEMBER 31. 1919 

Assets $66,840,376.95 Capital Actually Paid Up $ 1,000,000.00 

Deposits 63.352.269,17 Reserve and Contingent Funds 2.488,107.78 

Employees' Pension Funde $330,951.36 

OFFICERS 

IOHN A. BUCK. President 

GEO. TOURNY, Vice-Pres. and Manage. A. H. R. SCHMIDT. Vice-Pres. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE. Vice-President A. H. MULLER, Secretary 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN. Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL, Assistant Cashier 

G. A. BELCHER, Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN. Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYER, Manager Mission Branch W. C. HEYER. Manager Park-Presidio Dist. Branch 

O. F. PAULSEN, Manager Haight Street Branch 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JOHN A. BUCK E. T. KRUSE I. N. WALTER A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY A. H. R. SCHMIDT HUGH GOODFELLOW E. N. VAN BERBEN 

E. A. CHRISTENSEN ROBERT DOLLAR L. S. SHERMAN 

GOODFELLOW. EELLS. MOOUE & ORRICK. General Attorneys 



459 *3 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856. 





TER 



Devoted lo the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




vol. xcvm. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., SATURDAY, JULY 10, 1920 



No. 1 



Impressions and Expressions 



-Cox is no easy man to beat — even 



A good deal. 
Roosevelt, no 



with so many Democratic washouts in the 
road to the White House. 
* * ¥ 

What's in a name? 

Would-be Vice-President 

doubt, thinks so. 

¥ ¥ * 

The Commonwealth club has had old 

Sam Gompers giving them a talk, and that 
finishes Sam. If it doesn't, the Civic Center 
may invite him to spiel and then he will be 
surely mummified. 

We are sure of a safe and sane presi- 
dent, however, the election may turn this 
year. 

■■;■ ;;• ¥ 

Work is halted on eight needed pub- 
lic schools by strikes in Detroit while the 
mayor ponders whether to have his cops pro- 
tect the non-union workmen or appoint 
special guards, and put their pay in the 
budget. What a familiar sound that has to 
us in San Francisco. 

¥ ¥ *v 

Has that police court scandal of ours 

been lost in the excitement over the Demo- 
cratic convention? 

* * v- 

Is Bill Bryan as mad as he lets on to 

be in his newspaper roars about the Wilson- 
ized convention and a damp candidate for 
president? Bigger fees for the dry spielers. 
William! Bigger retainers from the Anti- 
Saloon League, old boy. So dry those croco- 
dile tears. 

•v • * 

Brother Hearst announces that if 

Harding shall denounce the Versailles treaty, 
from start to finish. Hiram Johnson will sup- 
port the Republican ticket, but weak Repub- 
lican denunciation may cool the Califor- 
nium's ardor. What would the world do if 
we hadn't Hearst and Hiram to supervise and 
direct? 



Will some eminent reformer arise on 

his hind legs and bray us an explanation of 
the presence of so many political bosses at 
each of the big conventions? We thought 
the tribe was extinct. 

¥ * * 

The newspapers are doing a lot of ex- 
plaining how the Los Angeles census was 
faked to outnumber San Francisco's popula- 
tion. 'Twas a raw deal, but we can boast 
that in rotten Bolshevik newspapers we have 
Los Angeles skinned a mile. The Chronicle 
is about the only friend of the unlucky busi- 
ness man and taxpayer. 



Only when a man runs for president 

can he perform the difficult and instructive 

feat of seeing himself as others see him. 

Generally he isn't swelled up over the view. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

What a fine medicine man Bill Bryan 

would have made for the original Indian 
population of Nebraska! How he could 
ladle them out the dope of mystic utterances 
and cold water. 

* * ¥ 

The Democratic convention made 

San Francisco look like Washington, D. C, 
with the gathering of statesmen who draw 
big salaries for doing politics on their own 
account. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

-Our big democracy does not need 



•Y- 

is the 



¥ ¥ 

matter with our State 



What 

University that it cannot live within its 
present immense income? Isn't there such 
a thing as making an institution top-heavy 
with ornamental "extensions," experimental 
departments, political bureau, etc., etc.? 
¥ « ¥ 

The most remarkable thing about 

Admiral Decker's allegations that Josephus 
Daniels is a blank on navy matters, is that 
some people are actually taking time to con- 
sider the question. 

¥ ¥ * 

Sam Plait of Nevada advises that Re- 
publican "spellbinders" be sent into Demo- 
cratic Nevada to swing it to the G. 0. P. 
That's the first time we've heard bankers 
called "spellbinders." 

•v- * v 

- The new passport rate of $9 instead 

of $1, will not stop those thirsty birds now 
flocking across the Atlantic. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

The market quotation this week is 

75 cents a jolt, with a guaranteed kick in 
it. Sold anywhere. 

♦ * ¥ 

That wt>man suffrage is but an 

aesthetic fad. is shown by the soporific 
apathy over it. while the heavens vibrate 
with tumult on the battlefield of booze. 



party planks on the teaching of "American- 
ism" half as much as it needs the teaching 
of good manners. 

What a feeble thing would be the 

greatest orator without newspapers to back 
him! The orator's day is passing. The pen 
is mightier than the jaw. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 
Senator Robinson of Arkansas, ac- 
cording to the Chronicle, handed Schwartz — 
custodian of the Democratic convention 
tickets — a solid wallop and kicked him when 
down. The fellow had the nerve to talk 
back to a gentleman. Lucky for Citizen 
Schwartz he had "no niggah blood in him!" 

¥•:••:■ 

Now, the divinity which doth hedge 

in a king having dissolved, we shall begin to 
get some real news from the White House. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

Hark from the tombs! Amos Pinchot 

speaking of the limbo of dead politicians, de- 
clares that the Hearst "Third Party" should 
receive earnest support this year. At that, 
tisn't a cinch that Amos or his political side- 
partner won't be denouncing it before 
election. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

And lo the name of Gavin McNab 

led all the rest! See the California delega- 
tion's lineup in the convention vote which 
put Cox over. Gavin seldom slips in board- 
ing the band wagon. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 10, 1920 



Editorial Opinion 





= 


The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA AD- 
VERTISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 259 Minna Street, near Fourth, San Francisco, Cal. Telephone 
Keamy 720. Entered at San Francisco. Cal.. Post-Office as second-class mail 
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London Office — George Street & Company, 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 
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Canada: 1 year, $3.50. 


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ANOTHER FORWARD STEP 

THE DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION has 
come and gone and San Francisco is all 
the better for it. The delegates from all 
parts of the United States were delighted by 
their pleasant experience in our city. The 
New Yorkers declared that San Francisco 
was the next thing to their metropolis in cos- 
mopolitan air. its business bustle indicative 
of enterprise on a large scale, and its facili- 
ties for the proper reception and enjoyment 
of travelers. Delegates from other States 
confessed that the life of San Francisco 
fascinated them. 

San Francisco has therefore been a great 
gainer in good repute, for the thousands of 
visitors from all parts will spread the fame of 
the wonder city of the Great West. 

Let us not forget that San Francisco but 
recently has been discovered by the Eastern 
States. What the full effects will be when 
the people of the less-favored places realize 
how much California and San Francisco, her 
unquestioned metropolis, has to offer, no one 
can foretell. 

The cities that shall arise around the gate- 
way of the Pacific and command the trade 
of the Orient will amaze mankind. 



THE DARK AGES MODERNIZED 

In an inconspicuous corner of one of our 
papers, it is announced that two negroes 
have been burned at the stake in Texas. 
Reports of a similar nature have been com- 
ing in so frequently of late that one is 
getting accustomed to giving them but a 
casual glance, skipping by them as a matter 
of course, and passing on to more pleasant 
topics. 

Yet the fact remains that in this civilized 
country two human beings — one but a boy 
of nineteen — were a few days ago illegally 
put to death by unpunished criminals, in the 
most horrible manner. 

Two human beings were seized, trembling 
and helpless, by a maddened mob of their 
enemies, and sent to their death in slow, 
fearful torment; they felt the flames writh- 
ing about them, and could not escape; they 
were burned and scorched and blistered; 
they cried out in their agony, and saw only 



the derisive, fiendish faces of their persecu- 
tors; they struggled and shrieked vainly, as 
they felt their limbs withered and roasted; 
they knew that soon, very soon, they must 
die, and the master desire to live called 
fiercely within them, and added to the torture 
of the fire; they pleaded and screamed for 
mercy, but their persecutors only laughed as 
the flames mounted higher — and at length 
they fell, unconscious, charred masses, into 
the crackling blazes. 

Meanwhile justice turns aside and hu- 
manity closes its eyes. Public sentiment re- 
mains unaroused. How long will this thing 
be continued before our citizens realize that 
every fire which blots out the life of a victim 




Democratic Standard-Bearer Covernor Cox. 

of mob violence, blackens the repute of the 
United States in the eyes of the whole civil- 
ized world. 



A REVIVAL OF BRIGANDAGE 

The report of a train robbery by a lone 
bandit three miles west of Sacramento comes 
like a tale from the legendary past. In these 
days of civilized activity, of time tables and 
precision, we have come to regard train 
robberies as fit material for motion pictures, 
and perhaps even for romantic novels, but 



have ceased to consider them as possibilities 
of actual life. Perhaps we are not as far 
from our primitive ancestors as we are wont 
to believe. There is the veneer of civiliza- 
tion, of railroads and skyscrapers and art 
galleries, but beneath the surface the aver- 
age man is very much the same as his an- 
cestors were, and it is a change of environ- 
ment rather than of natural inclinations that 
prevents outlawry from being less prevalent 
today than in the far-distant past. 



POPULATION AND IMPORTANCE 

During the past few months, when the 
census returns have been coming in, we have 
been watching the reports with an interest 
that might have signified that there is nothing 
in the world so important for a city to 
possess as population. As a matter of fact, 
population is only a means to an end, rather 
than an end in itself, and a city which can 
boast of nothing more than the number of its 
population has little to recommend it. 

Public improvements, parks, playgrounds, 
an efficient system of administration, an 
efficient municipal government, mean far 
more to a city than does mere numerical 
strength, and does far more toward giving 
the city a real importance in the world at 
large. If numbers were the prime desiderata, 
a city might boast of containing an insane 
asylum with thousands of inmates, or of 
being the home of a host of criminals. For- 
tunately, with population, as with other 
things, quality is more important than 
quantity. 



TRANSFORMED OPINIONS 

Some of our citizens have recently been 
taken to task for their change of opinion 
with regard to Hiram Johnson. But, how- 
ever remarkable their altered attitude, it is 
clearly outdone by the change of Lloyd 
George's position in relation to Lord Milner. 
In spite of the fact that nine years elapse be- 
tween the two statements, it is a little difficult 
to reconcile them. 

In 1909 Lloyd George asserted with much 
emphasis: 

Lord Milner found South Africa a 
smiling land, prosperous, leaping into 
great wealth — and left it after two years 
of mismanagement and miscalculation a 
scorched and blackened desert. He 
has a peculiar genius for lunning insti- 
tutions and countries into destructive 
courses. 

Nine years later the veracious premier of 
Great Britain and Ireland said of Lord 
Milner with equal emphasis: 

Is there any man in this country who 
is a more earnest, intelligent, drastic, 
thorough social reformer than Lord 
Milner? 
What wonders in politics time can work! 



July 10, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



ENCOURAGEMENT TO INDUSTRIES 

Baltimore has been selected as the site for 
a new refinery of the American Sugar Refin- 
ing company. The selection of that city was 
due to the invitation to the company to open 
a factory there, and to direct encouragement 
to the concern in the matter of a site and 
other vital matters. There is in this an 
example for San Francisco. If we would be- 
come more prominent in an industrial way, 
and have a greater number of factories, it 
would be well for us to consider Baltimore's 
method, and to offer inducements to indus- 
trial concerns we would have settle here. 

But has Baltimore so many other handi- 
caps to industry as has San Francisco in the 
way of agitations and agitators ? 



ASTONISHING INCONSISTENCY 

Why is Omaha all swelled up by its show- 
ing in the late census? It was chiefly famous 
as a steer-killing place till last year when it 
got a spasm of Bolshevism and tried to outdo 
the human butchery of Trotzky's reds. 
Murdering people one year, and blowing 
about increasing population the next, is in- 
consistency that even Washington, D. C, 
with all its idealistic statesmen could hardly 
beat. 



APPROACHING THE CLIMAX 

Groups of municipal employes in Chicago 
are adding fuel to the fire of labor dissatis- 
faction. The Chicago city council — unlike 
our San Francisco supervisors — having prac- 
tically refused all requests for raises of 
salary, the city hall bunches are threatening 
to remain on strike. What a splendid thing 
if such a thing occurred in our tax-burdened 
city. In about two days it would be demon- 
strated beyond question that the city hall 
rendered better municipal service when 
empty than when crammed to the bursting 
point with fat taxeaters. 



DEMOCRATIC STANDARD-BEARER 

Aside from partisan considerations, the 
Democrats have selected a good standard- 
bearer in Governor Cox, who is at the right 
age, and who has shown his steadiness as 
head of the government of Ohio. The 
people of the United States would not have 
cause to regret the election of Governor Cox 
to the White House. 

Equally worthy as a good American, of 
high principles is Senator Harding, the Re- 
publican standard-bearer. The contest for 
the high office of president this year will be 
one of State policies and not persons, and 
such it should always be. 



Father (upstairs) — It is time for that 
young man to go home. Young Man — Your 
father is a crank. Father (overhearing) — 
Well, when you don't have a self-starter, a 
crank comes in mighty handy. 



REPORT OF CONDITION OF 

The Anglo & London Paris National Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Al ihe Close of Business June 30, 1920. 

RESOURCES 

Loans and Discounls $ 42,958,005.63 

U. S. Bonds lo Secure Circulation 3,700.000.00 

Other U. S. Bonds and Certificates 8,972,062.00 

Other Bonds 8.478,009.86 

Other Assets 1 .552.098. 1 8 

Customers' Liability on Letters of Credit and Acceptances 24.670,046.73 

Commodity Drafts in Transit $ 8,482.198.43 

Cash and Sight Exchange 22,541.010.47 31.023,208.90 

$121,353,431.30 
LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock $ 5.000.000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 3,294,749.69 

Circulation 3.576,800.00 

Letters of Credit, Domestic and Foreign and Acceptances 24.670.046.73 

Federal Reserve Bank 4,697,000.00 

Bonds Borrowed 2.012,000.00 

Deposits 78,102.834.88 

$121,353,431.30 
OFFICERS 

HERBERT FLEISHHACKER. President 

MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER, Vice-Pres. JOHN GAYLE ANDERTON. Asst. Cashier and 

J. FR1EDL ANDER. Vice-Pres. Secretary. 

C. F. HUNT, Vice-Pres. GEO. A. VAN SMITH. Asst. Cashier. 

E. W. WILSON. Vice-Pres. V. KLINKER. Asst. Cashier. 

HARRY COE. Vice-Pres. J. S. CURRAN, Asst. Cashier. 

\V. E. WILCOX. Vice-Pres. and Cashier. EUGENE PLUNKETT. Asst. Curlier. 

J. W. LILIENTHAL. JR.. Vice-Pres. E. R. ALEXANDER. Asst. Cash. 

FRED F. OUER. Asst. Cashier. L. J. AUBERT. Asst. Cashie,. 

GEORGE ST1MMEL, Assistant Cashier. 



Fig Packing Demonstration 

Mrs. hred Hansen has installed a miniature packing plant in our stcrr, where she is demonstrating lo 
the public the modern methods and sanitary conditions under which 

SIERRA BRAND FIGS AND RAISINS Are Packed 

This sprrial r\cnt should not be overlooked by anyone. 

Special prices on all o( Mrs. Hansen's packs during this demonstration. 

Now at GOLDBERG, BOWEN & COMPANY, Grocers, 242 Sutter St. 



NEW LOCATION 

Of the Old-Established Firm of 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Cosgrove announce the 
opening of their new hair store, beautifully 
fitted and equipped with every modern 
convenience and facility for perfect service, at 

360 Geary Street 

Next to St. Francis Hotel 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 10, 1920 



Town Crier 



Hear the Crier: Who the Devil Art Thou? One Thai Will Plav the Devil, Sir, With V, 



San Francisco has three or four depart- 
ment stores that are a peril to themselves and 
a menace to adjoining property. Reference 
to these as dangerous examples is made on 
account of the ground space. Should a fire 
occur in any o r these places when they are 
thronged with people great loss of life might 
ensue. Up tc a certain point combustible 
material may be controlled by fire depart- 
ments, if efficient. Beyond reasonable limits, 
as in these enormous floor spaces, no amount 
of protection that can be brought to bear 
stands much chance with a fire well under 

way. 

* * * 

A little investigation in the city of San 
Francisco by the grand jury, ably assisted by 
the office of the district attorney, has un- 
earthed an infamy that has for a long time 
defeated justice and filched from honest 
pockets of the Golden State. It has been 
known for years that through a ring of pro- 
fessional jurors the people of this city have 
been systematically plundered of justice and 
right. Through some fancied injustice or 
fear of punishment, at least one of the 
rascals has been induced to turn State's evi- 
dence and disclosures have been made that 
are startling. Now that a beginning has been 
made, the investigation should proceed until 
the whole matter has been laid bare and 
the attorneys who have paid the money and 
engineered the rascality have been brought 
to bar and the penitentiary. 
¥ * * 

At one or two places along Market street, 
where the traffic is densest, at the Palace 
hotel corner, at the terminus of Kearny and 
Third streets and, possibly, at Powell, there 
should be subways for the accommodation 
and safety of pedestrians. Unfortunately no 
patriotic citizen has recently seen fit to have 
himself killed and filed with the board of 
supervisors as an impressive example of the 
necessity for this means of protection to 
human life, but his failure to perform this 
service to his fellows has been entirely acci- 
dental. Mark Twain, after having been 
kicked nine times across his own tent by a 
mule tethered on its outside, endured it the 
tenth time and then gave it up, saying it was 
growing monotonous. That seems to be the 
position now arrived at by the citizens of 
San Francisco. They avoid Market street 
when at all possible to do so and property 
owners suffer in consequence. 
•Y- * * 

Mr. W. J. Bryan told me last week that 
he approved the dry law for the reason that 



few men possessed the will power to drink 
in moderation. "Did he, he would not have 
the habit." We hear every day that in fol- 
lowing injurious desires men show lack of 
will, but it is probable that will has nothing 
to do with it. Will is that mental process 
which converts ideas into action. It is that 
which makes men do things, not refrain from 
doing them. The will invariably converts 
into action that idea which presents the 
greatest attraction to the mind. There is no 
such thing as free will. If the mind presents 
a sufficiently clear idea of the superior 
advantages to be obtained by abstinence, the 
craving will fail to stir the will into action. 

Is it a ghastly joke, or really true, or did I 
dream that a company is being capitalized to 
revivify the old Tivoli opera house and put 
on such pieces as the "Pirates of Penzance," 
"Mikado," "Chimes of Normandy," etc. ? 
"And he said unto me, son of man can 
these bones live? And I answered, Lord 
God, thou knowest." 

* # ¥ 

An individual who claims to be an Ameri- 
can citizen, paying taxes and having a right 
to know, appeals to a city paper to gratify 
his curiosity concerning the proposed bridge 
that was to connect San Francisco with Oak- 
land, and enquires: "What has become of 
her? Is she going to be built?" She! poor 
thing, died young. She had not reached on 
life's pathway the stone that marks the 
highest point (although she found a great 
many in the road), but being weary, she 
lay down by the wayside (somewhere be- 
tween here and Washington), and using her 
burden for a pillow (that was the softest 
thing she had), fell into that dreamless sleep 
that kisses down her eyelids still. 

•Y* ¥ ¥ 

There is scarcely a place of amusement 
in either San Francisco or Oakland where 
the cry of "Fire!" on any evening would fail 
to precipitate a panic that would measure 
the roasted, broken and maimed by the 
dozen. Ordinances prepared for the pro- 
tection of the public are all but dead letters; 
aisles are obstructed, water curtains are not 
in place, sprinklers for the wings are un- 
known, and all are bidding for a tragedy 



greater than any mimic stage can show — a 
literal feast of death that would make the 
devil laugh. The desire for a few extra 
dollars, past immunity and the wire exercise 
of that bastard offspring of our country, the 
political pull, make secure the management 
in turning up their noses at the safeguards 
everywhere recognized as necessary to pro- 
tect life. Any Saturday or Sunday night, 
especially, a great fire in the popular places 
of amusement would pile up a writhing, 
mixed mass of humanity, hundreds strong 
from which few would escape. Let 
the demon once escape the leash and 
there will be grief in every home. It is time 
now to mend the broken ordinances, to set a 
padlock on the pockets of the managers, to 
compel a recognition of the fact that blood 
and life are worth more than a few dollars. 
* * * 

The vital statistics for California for the 
past year or two afford food for thought, 
and also food for the undertakers. The 
alarming increase in the death rate for con- 
sumption has a significance that would justify 
a rigid system of quarantine against the one- 
lunged, though well-meaning, immigrant who 
is flocking to the Golden State by the hun- 
dred. That consumption is a contagious dis- 
ease is as well established as that Noah is a 
myth and the Garden of Eden a beautiful 
Munchausan dream. The advertising of 
our salubrious climate as a hospital for pul- 
monary complaint is loaded with misery and 
charged with mischief. Quarantine exists 
against yellow fever, smallpox and the 
plague. There is no reason in saying a dis- 
ease is not hurtful nor fatal because it is 
slow. If unrestricted immigration of con- 
sumptives and their indiscriminate mingling 
with more fortunate people adds definitely 
and distinctly to the hazards of general life, 
all possible means should be taken consistent 
with civilization and the greatest good to the 
greatest number for its discouragement. It 
is hardly fair to turn a climatic blessing into 
a physical curse. 



"How did you enjoy your Mexican trip?" 
"I was disappointed," replied the tourist. 
"How so?" "It was announced that Villa in 
person would rob our train, but he sent an 
understudy." 



Redd — Do you believe that no man is a 
hero to his valet? Greene — I don't know. 
But I'm sure that no man is a hero to his 
caddie. 



CLINTON CAFETERIA 



136 O'FARRELL STREET 
Opposite Orpheum Theater 



Continuous Serving from 7 A. M. to 8 P. M— Music. Lunch and Dinner Orcheslral and Vocal 



July 10, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



The Man From Mars 



By Stanton A. Coblentz 

HERE I am at last! 
As train service from Mars is rather 
irregular, I was a long time reaching 
San Francisco. At first I thought I should be 
late, which would have been a great pity, 
since I could not then have reported the 
Democratic Convention for the "Martian 
Daily Onlooker." 

San Francisco is the strangest city I ever 
saw. Many of the streets run up and down 
instead of sideways, and cars are pulled up 
them on long underground ropes. What a 
wonderful thing! We have no hills in Mars, 
but when I return I shall at once recommend 
that we have some built, in order to improve 
our street car service. 

As a stranger in a foreign world, I was 
naturally slow in getting acquainted with the 
ways of people here. Before leaving Mars, 
however, I had taken a University Extension 
course in Wireless English, and so I knew the 
language, although I spoke with a Martian 
accept. But no one seemed to recognize the 
Martian accent, and as soon as I opened my 
mouth, people would ask, "Have you left 
England for good?" 

Upon my arrival I was met by a news- 
paper reporter named Bragg, who informed 
me that I was enabling him to make a big 
"scoop." In return, he promised to tell me 
all about this country. "We are living in the 
most democratic land on earth," he ex- 
plained. "We pride ourselves on having no 
social ranks or classes, as among less en- 
lightened peoples. Our first principle is that 
all men are born free and equal." 

This impressed me as a very wise pro- 
vision, and I was anxious to observe for 
myself how free and equal men were. I 
was born satisfied. Walking with Bragg 
down Market street I noticed that most of 
tile people were nicely dressed — it was easy 
to see that all were equal. "Come with me." 
Bragg then said, "and I'll show you another 
part of town." He took me two blocks away, 
to a place named Howard street, and I saw- 
to my surprise that nearly every one wore 
dilapidated old clothes, and that many had 
shriveled laces that looked like masks. 

"Were these people also born free and 
equal )" I inquired. 

"Well, at least they're equal among them- 
selves," said Bragg. 

"And what have they done to have this 
happen to them?" I continued. 

"What have ihey done?" Bragg repeated. 
seeming not to understand. 

jes, what was their crime?" I specified. 

"None, except that they were bom poor, 
and stayed that way." 



This impressed me as a grievous offense, 
for on my planet there are no poor folk out- 
side of jail. But I fear I am very stupid 
about earthly affairs, for I could not under- 
stand how the shabby people and the silk- 
robed ones could be equal. At last, how- 
ever, I saw the explanation. "The finely 
dressed people," I said, "must have done 
some great service to entitle them to greater 
comforts." 

"Oh, no," corrected Bragg. "Many of 
them were born that way." 

"But I thought you said all men were 
born equal ! " I exclaimed. Here again my 
hopeless stupidity stood in my way, for I 
was unable to understand how it was that 
while all men were born equal, some were 
born with greater advantages than others. 
" "At any rate," I remarked, "I suppose 
that, since this is a democratic country, those 
who are fortunate from birth encourage the 
others to share in their advantages." 

"Yes, indeed," affirmed Bragg. "We have 
charitable societies for that purpose." 

"And I suppose the rich invite the poor 
to their homes, and entertain them, and go 
to the homes of the poor, and help them all 
they can." 

Bragg looked horrified. "Good heavens. 



ne exclaim 



laimed. "Do 



you 



think 



crazy? A rich man would feel disgraced to 
associate with one of the poorer classes!" 

"But I thought you had no classes," I 
protested. I was completely bewildered — 



the ways of men are so strange! I shall 
never understand them! I am afraid I was 
not satisfied even when Bragg explained, 
"We have no social classes, but, you see, 
some groups of the people live on a much 
higher plane than others, and do not asso- 
ciate with those below them. Nevertheless, 
the higher groups feel a natural sympathy 
for the inferior, and a generous desire to 
help them." 

Just at this point I was stopped by a 
ragged old man, who said, "I ain't had a bite 
since yesterday. Please, could you give me 
enough for a cup of coffee?" 

I reached into my pocket, and was about 
to hand the unfortunate man a five-dollar 
bill, when Bragg caught my arm and ex- 
claimed, "Stop! Don't be foolish! If you 
pay attention to these beggars you won't 
have a cent left by evening." 

I was amazed. "In this free and demo- 
cratic country, do you allow people to 
starve?" I asked. 

"Of course not!" protested Bragg. "We 
have charitable societies to preveift that! 
And anyhow, there's a law against begging!" 

"But isn't it considered disgraceful to 
appeal to a charitable society?" I inquired. 

"So it is." acknowledged Bragg. 

"Then, when a man is reduced to extremi- 
ties, he has the choice between breaking the 
law and being disgraced?" 

"No. there arc other ways." Bragg in- 
formed me. "He is free to starve, or he 
may commit suicide, though the latter also is 
against the law. But many do take that 
course. However, while there may be some 
deserving ones, the reason I wouldn'l help 
(Continued on Page Eight) 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 10, 1920 



False Political Prophets 



OF THE sixteen times that the Demo- 
cratic party met in National conven- 
tion between 1856 and 1916, it has 
discredited predictions in nine cases, and 
confirmed them in seven. Of the seventeen 
Republican conventions, on the other hand, 
ten have upheld the prophets, and seven 
gone counter to them. 

At the Democratic convention of 1856, 
there was much random guessing. Presi- 
dent Pierce was scheduled to be his own suc- 
cessor, but eight dark horses were named 
as alternatives. Betting, however, was two 
to one on Buchanan, who won on the seven- 
teenth ballot, with none of the dark horses in 
the race. In I860, it was thought that 
Douglas was certain to get the nomination, 
but disagreements arose on the slavery ques- 
tion and Breckenridge was nominated. Ir 
1864 much hope was aroused by the 
nomination of McClellan, and though the 
result was so uncertain that Lincoln at one 
time seriously doubted his own re-election, 
McClellan carried but three States. 

Numerous candidates were in the field in 
1868, but while it was declared that Pendle- 
ton had a certainty, the nomination went to 
Seymour, in spite of that candidate's en- 
deavor to avoid being named. Horace 
Greeley was the candidate agreed upon in 
1872, after a temporary split in the conven- 
tion ; and the overwhelming defeat of the 
noted journalist by General Grant was sur- 
prising to both parties alike. In 1876 Tilden 
was the candidate generally predicted, and 
the talk of Hendricks and Thurman was no 
more than casual. The disputed election 
that resulted is a matter of common 
knowledge. 

The convention of 1880 acted as differ- 
ently from predictions as that of 1876 had 
acted in accordance with them. Tilden and 
Seymour were prominently mentioned, but 
declined emphatically. Payne and Hendricks 
were booming, and Hancock was scarcely 
mentioned, yet he received 171 votes on the 
first ballot, and was nominated on the third. 
In 1884, on the other hand, the nominee had 
been known for two years in advance, for 
Cleveland's huge majority for the governor- 
ship of New York had assured his nomina- 
tion for the presidency. In 1888 predictions 
were again fulfilled, and Cleveland was nom- 
inated to succeed himself. Likewise in 1892, 
no one seriously predicted that Cleveland 
would not again be nominated, and again 
no one was wrong. 

Eighteen ninety-six was a year of sur- 
prises. Free silver was then the foremost 
issue, and on that question Teller, Boles, 
Matthews and McLean were advocated. 



while scarcely any one not from Nebraska 
thought of William Jennings Bryan. Yet 
Bryan, with his famous "Cross of Gold" 
oration, won the nomination on the fifth 
ballot. 

In 1900 the renomination of Bryan was 
conceded, but the contest raged hot on the 
question of the vice presidential candidate, 
and dozens were proposed before Stevenson 
was finally chosen. Four years later Bryan 
was out of the race, so far as the nomina- 
tion was concerned, but he took a prominent 
part in the selection of the candidate, and 
was strong in his opposition to Judge Parker, 
who, however, was nominated on the first 
ballot. In another four years Bryan had 
regained his supremacy in the party, but 
speculation as to what vice presidential can- 
didate he would favor was mostly amiss. 

In 1912 Clark was regarded as the 
strongest possibility, though some of the 
papers had prophesied that Bryan would 
champion Wilson. But the long and excit- 
ing contest preceding the nomination was 
entirely unexpected. 

In 1916, on the contrary, everything that 
happened was anticipated and prophets and 
non-prophets alike would have been much 
surprised had not Wilson and Marshall been 
renominated. 



A BRILLIANT AFFAIR 

One of the most brilliant affairs which has 
taken place recently was the luncheon given 
by Mr. and Mrs. George Pope at their Bur- 
lingame home Monday. Their guests in- 
cluded Ambassador George Bakhmeteff of 
Russia. Senor Pezet. Peruvian ambassador, 
and Mrs. Pezet and a number of the other 
distinguished visitors to California. Covers 
were laid for fifty guests. 



HOME AGAIN 

After a long absence East and abroad, Mr. 
and Mrs. William H. Crocker have returned 
to California and are at their home. New 
Place, in Burlingame. Mrs. Crocker accom- 
panied her sister and daughter. Princess 
Poniatawski, and Miss Helen Crocker, to 
France early in the season and returned to 
this country last month to join Mr. Crocker 
in Chicago. 



" 'Rattlesnake Bill' is strangely altered. 
What's the trouble?" "Bill says if he had 
known what was before him when he went 
into the movies he would have stuck to train- 
robbing and kept his self-respect. In the old 
days no man ever talked to him the way the 
director does and lived to tell the tale." 



(Continued from Page Seven) 
these beggars is that most of them are only 
acting." 

"Then they ought to be able to draw big 
salaries on the stage," I commented. "How- 
ever, I don't see what difference it makes 
whether they're acting or not. It doesn't 
seem to be much worse to be destitute than 
to have to make a living by feigning desti- 
tution." 

Bragg looked at me despondently. "I see 
you're hopeless," he replied. 

"Undoubtedly," I said, feeling ashamed 
and guilty. "No matter how I try, I cannot 
understand your system. To my untutored 
intellect, it would appear that men are born 
unequal, and take pride in being so, if the 
inequality is in their favor. But, since I 
have your word for it, I am sure this is a 
most democratic country." 

That evening I was surprised to see the 
following in the paper for which Bragg is 
reporter: 

"The man from Mars expressed the 
highest admiration for our democracy, whose 
merits, he said, were so great that he could 
not understand them. Coming as this does 
from a visitor from another world, it is a 
rare tribute to the excellence of our institu- 
tions." 



TAINTED MONEY 

Soap Box Orator — An' I tell you that all 
them millionaires' money is tainted — all of it. 

Unconvinced Person — 'Ow d'ye mean, 
"Tainted?" 

Soap Box Orator — Well, 'taint yours, an' 
'taint mine, is it? 



"That young lady is very striking." "A 
handsome girl." "But I never see her doing 
any work around your law office." "She's 
valuable, however. When the other side has 
a pretty witness we find her very useful as a 
counter attracion." 



THE PALACE HOTEL 

was selected as 
Headquarters of 

The Democratic National Committee 

Democratic Convention 

June 28, 1920. 

SERVICE 

and 
SMILES 

That's Why— 

PALACE HOTEL 

Management of 

HALSEY E. MANWARING 



July 10. 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



ROYALTY'S DUTIES 



THE duties of a king in these days are to 
make himself popular Without popu- 
larity he may be out of a job. The 
crown prince of England, who is making the 
rounds of the British colonies, is doing his 
princely best to popularize the throne, and 
thereby giving great satisfaction to his 
family and the Britishers at home who in 




the newspapers it is plain that the British 
consider their monarch an essential social 
figurehead. And as such they work the man 
early and late. There seems to be no end of 
his social duties. No eight-hour day for the 
crowned head. 

He is the central figurehead from the 
launching of a battleship to the opening of a 
cattle-show in one of the shires. How he 
ever stands the unceasing strain is a marvel. 

Evidently, the Britishers figure it out that 
a nation must have social standards. Other- 
wise the social condition is as mixed as 
boarding-house hash. 

The English crown prince is obtaining 
such popularity in Australia that the Sydney 
Bulletin depicts him as pursued by souvenir 
hunters. 



i,e»icrw . 

Australian Souvenir Hunters 

their heart of hearts, dearly love a monarch, 
who does not hold his head too high. 

Let us give the Britishers credit for having 
more sense about kings and princes than 
many of us imagine. Looking at all the 
pictures and notices of the English king in 



IN THE GOOD OLD DAYS 

In a dream I was borne to Republican Rome, 
Where I strayed through the haunts of 

tradition. 
Upon Jupiter's shrine there was pasted a 

sign: 
"Your votes for complete prohibition!" 

In the Fo;um was Cicero making a speech: 
"My friends, it's a shame and a pity 
To think that our personal freedom would 

end 
If this statute should pass in our city!" 



The Crocker National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

CONDITION AT CLOSE OF BUSINESS JUNE 30. 1920. 

R] SOURCES 

Loans and Discounts $26,037,020.54 

U. S. Bonds and Certificates 4JOI.452.75 

Other Bonds and Securities 257.164.75 

Capita! Stock in Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco 150.000.00 

Customers' Liability under Letters ol Credit 7^22.463.18 

Casli and Sight Exchange I3J090 

8,140.07 
LIABILITIES 

Capital * 2.000.000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits UI9J9I.78 

Circulation I.W 

Letters of Credit Mlf 

Deposits »5.ISI 

$52,458,140.07 
OFFICI RS 



WM. H. CROCKER. President 



JAS. J. FAGAN \ ,oe. President 

W. GREGC Vtte-Prea. and Cashier 

I. B. MoC ARC \R Vice-President 

WILLIAM Y\ CROCKER V.ce-Pres. 

G. W. EBNFR A»t. Cashier 

B. D. DEAN Ami. Cashier 

J. M. MASTFN Asst. Cashier 



D. J. MURPHY 
F. G. \\ III IS 
A. C. READ 

i ux 



Asst. Cashier 
Asst. Cashier 



Aaat Cashier 
Asst. Cashier 
\ Mgf For. Dept. 

S N SMILEY Aaat Mgr. For. Dept. 

C FERIS BALDWIN Audita 



WM. H. CROCKER 
CHARLES T. CROCKER 
JAS. J. FAGAN 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

GEORGE YV SCOTT A F. MORRISON 

ill AS I GREEN S. F. R MORS 

\\. CRECC WILLIAM W CROCKER 



The Daily Penates in headlines advised: 
"Defeat this insane innovation!" 
A chorus of property owners bewailed: 
"It's unlawful and gross confiscation!" 

"We're against prohibition!" the people 

exclaimed. 
"For to business 'twould surely be blighting 
If we should prohibit the slaying of men 
In our gladiatorial fighting!" 
— Stanton A. Coblentz, in New York Times. 



E. F. HUTTON & GO. 



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PERFECT SERVICE INSURES SATISFai l IOS 

Offices, 908 Market St , T hird F loor 
TELEPHONE GARFIELD 83S 



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COMPANY of America 

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SAM B. STOY, Manager 

Geo. Ormond Smith. Agency Superintendent. 

San Francisco 

J. P. Yates. Agency Superintendent 1 . 

Los Angeles 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 10. 1920 



High Prices No Novelty 



HIGH prices are by no mean; purely 
mi/Hern creations. In spite of the 
many advantages that we of the 
twentieth century possess, we have no right 
to claim a monopoly of extravagance and 
profiteering. Our ancestors of a hundred 
and fifty years afo knew nearly if not quite 
so much about these things as we. 

In 1767 a writer in "The London Gentle- 
man's Magazine" ascribed the objectionably 
high prices then ruling to the increase of na- 
tional debts and of the wealth of private 
individuals. 

To pay interest for new funds, new taxes 
were every year imposed, and additional 
burdens laid on every comfort and almost 
every necessary of life. These unavoidably 
increased prices, and in a much greater pro- 
portion than usually understood. For a duty 
laid on any commodity does not only add 
the value of that duty to that commodity, 
but the dealer in it must advance the price 
double or treble times that sum. He must 
not only repay himself the original tax, but 
must have compensation for his losses in 
trade by bad debts, and loss of interest by 
his increased capital. 

It was also pointed out by the old maga- 
zine writer that every new tax not only 
effects the price of the commodity on which 
it is laid, but that of all others, whether taxed 
or not, and with which, at first sight, it seems 
to have no manner of connection. Thus, 
for instance, a tax on candles must raise the 
price of a coat, or a pair of breeches; be- 
cause, out of these, all the taxes on the 
candles of the wool-comber, weaver, and the 
tailor must be paid. A duty upon ale must 
raise the price of shoes, because from them 
all the taxes upon ale drunk by the tanner, 
leather-dresser and shoemaker, which is not 
a little, must be refunded. No tax is immedi- 
ately laid upon corn, but the price of it must 
necessarily be advanced, because, out of 
that, all the innumerable taxes paid by the 
farmer on windows, soap, candles, malt, 
hops, leather, salt, and a thousand others, 
must be repaid. So that corn is as effect- 
ually taxed as if a duty by the bushel had 
been primarily laid upon it. And so it goes. 

The other great source, from whence this 
calamity arises, is certainly our vast increase 
of riches. 

Referring to the effect of increased private 
wealth in advancing prices the old London 
magazine writer said: 

"The effects of this vast and sudden 

increase of riches are no less evident 

than their cause. The first, and most 

obvious effect of the increase of money 



is the decrease of its value, like that 
of all other commodities, for money 
being but a commodity, its value must 
be relative, that is, depending upon the 
quantity of itself, and the quantity of 
the things to be purchased with it. In 
every country where there is great 
plenty of provisions, and but little 
money, there provisions must be cheap, 
that is, a great deal of them will be 
exchanged for a little money; on the 
contrary where there are but little pro- 
visions in proportion to the number of 
consumers, and a great plenty of 
money, or what passes for money, there 
they will inevitably be dear, that is, a 
great deal of money must be given to 
purchase them. These effects must 
eternally follow their causes in all 
ages, and in all countries; and that 
they have done so, the history of all 
countries in all ages sufficiently in- 
form us. The value of money at the 
time of the Norman conquest was near 
twenty times greater than at present; 
and it has been gradually decreasing 
from that period in proportion as our 
riches have increased. 

"The increase of money does not only 
operate on the price of provisions by 
the diminution of its own value, but by 
enabling more people to purchase, and 
consequently to consume them; which 
must unavoidably likewise increase 
their scarcity, and that must still add 
more to their price. Twenty rich 
families will consume ten times as 
much meat, bread, butter, soap and 
candles as twenty poor families consist- 
ing of the same number; and the prices 



of all these must certainly rise in pro- 
portion to the demand. This effect of 
the increase of wealth in many coun- 
tries of Europe, is very visible at this 
day, and in none more than in the 
northern parts of this island, who having 
of late acquired riches by the introduc- 
tion of trade, manufactures, and tillage, 
can now well afford to eat roast beef 
rnd therefore consume much of those 
cattle, with which they were formerly 
glad to supply us; and will not part with 
the rest but at prices greatly advanced." 



NOT HERSELF 

"The prima donna says she is not herself 
tonight." 

"Umph!" exclaimed the long-suffering 
manager. 

"Do you mean to tell me she is actually 
decent to the other members of the com- 



pany 



j" 



"What became of that girl Masherton was 
flirting with last summer?" "You mean the 
girl that Masherton thought he was flirting 
with? She married him." 



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July 10. 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 



DISTANCE LENDS ENCHANTMENT 

We have heard much of late about the 
admirable working of the Australian system 
of arbitration, and there can be no doubt 
that at long distance it does look enticing, as 
far hills and skies always do from the re- 
mote valleys. But viewed at close range, it 
does not look so beautiful. The Sydney 
Bulletin, one of the oldest and most reputable 
papers of Australia, declares: "There is so 
much congestion in the Federal Arbitration 
court that at least one case listed in 1918 
is not yet disposed of. 

"Mr. Tudor, leader of the Federal Labor 
party, regards the difficulty of reaching the 
court as one of the prime causes of indus- 
trial quarrels." 

The accompanying cartoon illustrates the 
lively situation as seen by the Bulletin. 
Labor and Capital are at close grips and 
brotherly love is nowhere in evidence. 

There is always some hitch in the plans 
to make the lion and the lamb lie down in 
harmonious confidence. Will there always 
be a hitch? 



GAME-HUNTING BY AEROPLANE 

At a recent lecture in London, Dr. Mitchell 
Chalmers interestingly recounted his experi- 
ences on an aeroplane trip from Cairo to- 
ward the Cape. 

The lecturer described the main geological 
and geographical features of the route 
traversed as seen from the air, and explained 
his discovery of a hitherto unknown volcanic 
area north of Khartum, between Meroe and 
Berber. 

There were, said Dr. Chalmers Mitchell, 
very few insects, except white ants, on the 
dry desert areas on which they had for the 
most part descended, and the trip had been 
made during the driest season of the year. 
On many of the aerodromes, white ants or 
termites were present in huge colonies, and 
the wheels and tail-skid of the aeroplane 
were kept protected by bands of thick 
grease. He and his companions were pro- 
vided with mosquito nets within which they 
had slept when they camped out. But mos- 
quitoes had caused them very little trouble in 
the open, although they suffered severely 
Irom them in many of the "civilized" settle- 
ments. He had been bitten by tsetse fly on 
two occasions and was greatly surprised by 
the painfulness of the bite. A still more 
annoying insect was a large tabanid. known 
as the hippopotamus fly. 

With regard to larger animals, more had 
been seen from the aeroplane than he had 
anticipated, partly because he had asked the 
pilots to fly near the ground. From Helipolis 
to Khartum no mammals except camels and 
other domesticated creatures were visible. 
From Khartum southward the wild fauna 
was much more abundant. At Renk. south 
of Join-loin, they had made a forced landing 



<m 



MZfti 3 



■ 




LABOR ARBlTRATIOh IS AUSTRALIA 

Dcliglilful lu-tv "I the ( ongejfcd 77al*eJ on the R<taJ to Justice, as S/tolrn in a Cartoon from the 

Svt/ncy Bulletin. 

and had to pass the night. Some elephants 
came very near, trumpeting loudly, but ap- 
parently were scared away by the fire. The 
first elephants actually seen were in the 
Sudd, a female and young on a small green 
island. They seemed frightened by the 
noise of the plane and plunged or fell into 
the water. Soon after leaving Mongalla. 
near Mount Lado, a large herd, known as 
the Gondokoro herd, was passed. It con- 
sisted of nearly twenty animals, some of the 
elephants being quite young. Between the 
Victoria Nile and Lake Victoria Nyanza 
mrny elephants were seen, including one 
enormous bull with very large tusks. Rhino- 
ceros were seen frequently, generally two or 
three together. They were always more 
scared of the aeroplane than were elephants 
Hippopotamus were seen in large numbers, 
both in the Nile and the lakes. On several 
occasions the aeroplane had come down so 
close to the water that he had seen them 
opening and shutting their nostrils. The 
hippos took no notice of the aeroplane. 
Buffalo and immense herds of buck were 
passed repeatedly from Khartum right 
thiough to German East Africa. 



Potted Plants 
and Ferns 

OF DISTINCTION 

SUITABLE FOR ANY 

OCCASION AT NURSERY 

PRICES 

Bay Counties Seed Co. and 

Nurseries 

-104 Market Street. San Francisco 



Old Hampshire Bond 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

The Standard Paper for Business Stationery. 
"Made a little belter than seems necessary." The 
typewriter papers are sold in attractive and durable 
botes containing five hundred perfect sheets, plain 
or marginal ruled. The manuscript covers are sold 
in similar boxes containing one hundred sheet*. 
Order through your printer or stationer, or. if so de- 
s'red we will send a sample book showing the anlire 

brae. 

BLAKE. MOFFIT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
IRST STRRFT SAN FP 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 10, 1920 



Gossip of Society 



DISTINGUISHED CUESTS 
The Burlingame home of Mr. and Mrs. 
George Pope was the scene of a delightful 
buffet luncheon Sunday, when they enter- 
tained for a large number of visitors here for 
the convention. Among those who were 
present on this occasion were: Ambassador 
and Mme. Mathieu, Chile; Messrs. and 
Mesdames Samuel Knight, Henry Scott, 
Charles B. Henderson, Horace Blanchard 
Chase, James A. Folger, William H. Crocker, 
Gerald Rathbone, George Howard, George T. 
Marye, Laurence Irving Scott, Walter Mar- 
tin, Fentriss Hill, Thomas Eastland, J. Frank 
Judge, Willard Drown, Mrs. George Barr 
Baker! Ambassadors Thomas le Breton, 
Boris Bakmeteff, James W. Gerard; Gov- 
ernor Albert Ritchie of Maryland; Messrs. 
John Drum, Rennie Pierre Schwerin, Stew- 
art Lowery, Colonel Sidney Cloman, J. C. 
Fordyce, St. Louis; Francis Carolan. 



SHARON LUNCHEON 
Mrs. Frederick W. Sharon entertained at a 
beautifully appointed luncheon in the Palm 
Court of the Palace hotel Monday afternoon 
in honor of her cousin, Mrs. James B. 
Haggin, who is visiting here from her home 
in New York. Among those present at the 
luncheon were: Mesdames George Pope, 
James Flood, Dixwell Hewitt, George Harry 
Mendell, William S. Tevis, Horace Blanch- 
ard Chase, Wm. Hinckley Taylor, James 
Ward Keeney, George T. Marye, Richard 
Sprague, Louis Parrott, William H. Crocker, 
George Harding, Philadelphia; Miss Laura 
McKinstry. 



HOOPER-JOHNSON WEDDINC 

Miss Ursula Hooper, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Joseph G. Hooper, was married Satur- 
day afternoon at her home on Pacific avenue 
to Choteau Johnson of New York. The 
ceremony was performed by Father Traught 
in the presence of a number of relatives and 
intimate friends. 

Mrs. Joseph B. Hutchinson and Mrs. Curtis 
O'Sullivan are sisters of the bride and George 
and Thomas Hooper are brothers. 

Johnson is the son of Captain D. D. John- 
son of New York. His mother was Miss 
Choteau of St. Louis. 

The young couple have left for a several 
weeks' honeymoon trip. On their return 
they will make their home in this city. 



Mr. and Mrs. William T. Sesnon and their 
daughters. Miss Katharine and Miss Barbara 
Sesnon, who are at their home in the Santa 
Cruz mountains, entertained a number of 
their friends over last week-end. 



AT DEL MONTE 

Interest is being attracted by a golfing 
event for the Junior Championship of Cali- 
fornia to be held at Del Monte, July 19 to 
22. Another event of interest which recently 
transpired was a two-day swimming exhibi- 
tion by Duke Kahanamoku of Honolulu, as- 
sisted by a number of other expert swimmers 
from the Islands. 

During the month of July the Del Monte 
art gallery will exhibit recent monotypes by 
Clark Hobart, whose work has attracted much 
attention in various exhibitions throughout 
America. 



Members of the Del Monte Polo club have 
hailed with interest the announcement that 
Captain Tate will be a member of the U. S. 
Army team that will play in the interna- 
tional polo tournament at the Olympic 
games. Captain Tate played at Del Monte 
two years ago as a member of the Seventh 
cavalry team which came up from the 
Texas border. He made an impression at 
that time as a wonderful, hard hitter and a 
good man with the mallet. The chances are 
that he has improved and will be an import- 
ant factor in the game. 

A sport event at Del Monte that will be 
regarded as something entirely unequaled 
will be a roundup of elk next month in the 
Del Monte forest. There is a herd of some 
thirty-five or forty of these knights of the 
hills. It has been found necessary to remove 
them from such close proximity to civiliza- 
tion because of their destructiveness. The 
elk have invaded the gardens and farms of 
the residents of the Monterey peninsula and 
they are accordingly to be removed to the 
Yosemite Valley and Monterey County Na- 
tional Forests. In order to get them together 
cowboys and horsemen in the vicinity of Del 
Monte will conduct a roundup and drive 
them into a paddock. The elk are quite 
wild and it is expected that a good deal of 
interesting sport will be provided. 



Mr. and Mrs. Edward G. Schmiedell and 
daughters, Miss Elizabeth and Miss Doris 
Schmiedell, and their son, Edward G. 
Schmiedell, Jr., who are at Lake Tahoe 
until August or September, entertained as 
their house guests for the week-end: Misses 
Ellita Adames, Mary Julia Crocker; Messrs. 
Harry Crocker, William Hendrickson, Leon 
Walker, Alfred Hendrickson. 



Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Banning and Miss 
Katherine Banning of Los Angeles, recent 
visitors here, are motoring in the Yosemite 

valley. 



Jean St. Cyr gave a dinner party at the 
Del Monte lodge which was enjoyed by Mr. 
and Mrs. A. H. Vincent, Harry Hunt, Mrs. 
Jane Selby Hayne and Miss Yzabel Chase. 



Ambassadors James W. Gerard and 
Thomas le Breton of the Argentine were the 
honored guests at a dinner which Mr. and 
Mrs. Daniel C. Jackling gave on July 2 at 
their apartments in the Hotel St. Francis. 



Mr. and Mrs. Templeton Crocker spent the 
week-end at Del Monte. 



?3fe Casa del Rey 

is a million dollar fire-proof hotel, on 
the sunny bathing beach at Santa 
Cruz. It offers the advantages of 
tennis, golf, motoring, fishing and 
swimming, and is the center of Santa 
Cruz social life. 

MORRIS & WARNER, Piops. 



The Cecil Hotel 

of San Francisco offers 
the perfect combination 
of home and hotel life. 
Cuisine excellent. Lux- 
ury of billiard, card and 
reading rooms. 

Mrs. O. E. MORRIS. Proprietor. 



BLANCO'S 

Farrell and Larkin Sts. 
Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without 
dining in the finest cafe in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner $1.75 



J. B. Pou J. Bergez C. Lalanne 

L. Coutard C. Mailhebuau 

BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old POODLE-DOG Co. 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

Music and Entertainment Every Evening 

41 5-42 1 Bush St., San Francisco 

(Above Kearny) Exchange, Doug. 241 1 



July 10, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



On July Fourth in the Palm Grill at Hotel 
Del Monte Mr. and Mrs. E. Swift Train, 
Mrs. John F. Neville, Mr. and Mrs. George 
Nickel, Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Whitney 
formed a congenial group at dinner. 



Among those spending the Fourth at Del 
Monte were Mr. and Mrs. Dalton Mann and 
Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Haldorn. 



One of the most notable of recent in- 
formal social events was the dinner given 
in honor of Mrs. Annette Adams, Assistant 
United States Attorney General, by Mr. and 
Mrs. H. Clay Miller at their South Palo Alto 
home. 



Mr. and Mrs. Hanson Grubb are receiving 
congratulations of their friends on the birth 
of a son. 



Mr. and Mrs. James Reid have arrived 
from New York and are guests at the Fair- 
mont. They will divide their time between 
the hotel and the Burlingame Country club, 
where Mr. Reid made his home up to the 
time of their marriage, which took place in 
New York about a month ago. Mrs. Reid 
was Mrs. Mae Sadler Meade of this city. 



Mrs. George Barr Baker of New York has 
come to California for the summer and will 
be at the Burlingame Country club for the 
season. 



TECHAU TAVERN FEATURES ARE 

CRITERIONS OF ENTERTAINMENT 



Oftimes a place is distinguished by virtue 
of some one outstanding feature, a restaurant 
by virtue of its good cooking, its matchless 
service, its soothing music, or jollity of en- 
tertainment, but when one finds all these 
features each individually standing out as 
an authentic attraction of high merit, and 
when they all. in their entirety rank in the 



Service— 

at Willard's 

Goes beyond merely selling you the 
apparel you need 

— it assures absolute satisfaction. 
— a lull dollar's worth of value 
for every dollar spent. 

correctness in style with 
moderation in expense. 

Acquaintance will always develop 
a preference for IVillard apparel 

WILLARD'S 

139-153 GEARY STREET 



topmost standards of public approval, then 
indeed do they command attention. And so 
it is at Techau Tavern, the matchless dancing 
floor, the Techau Tavern dance orchestra, 
which has earned the sobriquet of "The 
Foremost Attraction in the City," while the 
dainty, alluring artists that compose the 
ballet and revue would banish the dullest of 



dull cares from anyone's make-up. Saturday 
afternoons society attend the Tea Dansants 
which are so attractive to many that they are 
becoming a custom, and the Lucky Dances 
every evening, featuring Duval's Paste Rouge 
in individual containers, Hilson's Ladies' 
Toggery orders and large boxes of Melr- 
chrino cigarettes form a continual round of 
surprises and amusement. 



COMBINED STATEMENT OF CONDITION 

HEAD OFFICE AND BRANCHES 

Bank of Italy 



SAVINGS 



TRUST 



COMMERCIAL 
HEAD OFFICE, SAN FRANCISCO 

MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 

June 29, 1920 

RESOURCES 

First Mortgage Loans on Real Estate $37,442,749.93 

Other Loans' and Discounts 45.891,387.93 

Bankers' Acceptances 427.944.56 $ 83.762.082.42 



United States Bonds and Certificates of Indebtedness $17,353,836.42 

State. County and Municipal Bonds 10.080.453.08 

Other Bonds 7.200.961 .69 



Stock in Federal Reserve Bank 

Cash and Exchanges $ 6.678.694.64 

Due from Federal Reserve Bank 5.869.075.75 

Due from Other Banks 3.729,077.79 



TOTAL CASH AND DUE FROM BANKS 

Banking Premises. Furniture. Fixtures and Safe Deposit Vaults 

Other Real Estate Owned 

Customers' Liability under Letters of Credit and Acceptances ... 

Interest Earned but not Collected 

Employees' Pension Fund (Carried on Books at) 

Othr Resources 



34,635.251.10 
255.000.00 



16.276.848.18 

4.499.983.40 

303.840.01 

2.119.746.49 

783,634.18 

1.00 

1 .222.070.74 



Total Resources 



DEPOSITS 



$143,858,457.52 



LIABILITIES 



"Capital Paid in $ 7 .000.000.00 

Surplus 1.500.000.00 

Undivided Profits 1.924.959.37 



$129,599,593.18 



10.424.959.37 
351.698.09 
214.777.03 
147.683.30 

2.119.746.49 
1.000.000.00 



$143.858.457.52 



TOTAL CAPITAL. SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS.. 

Dividends Unpaid .- 

Discount Collected, but not Earned 

Reserved for Taxes and Interest Accrued 

Letters of Credit. Acceptances and Time Draft* 

Federal Reserve Bank (U. S. Certificates of Indebtedness) 

Total Liabilities 

•Paid in Capital will be increased to $9,000,000 on July 14. 1920. 

All charge-offs. expenses and interest payable to end of half-year have been deducted in above 
statement. 

The Story of Our Growth 

As Shown by a Comparative Statement of Our Resources 
June 30. 1905 $633,298.02 

June 30. 1907 $2,243,846.91 

June 30, 1909 $3,037,955.09 

June 30, 1911 $7,333,665 55 

June 30, 1913 $14,162,357.50 

June 30, 1915 $19,080,264 20 

June, 30, 1917 $48,828,678.14 

June 30, 1919 .... $107,506,382.75 

June 29, 1920. $143,858,457.52 

Number of Depositors J 

Savings Deposits Made on or Before July 10. 1920 Will Earn Interest from July I. 1920 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 10, 1920 



The Motorists 



The movement now on foot in San Fran- 
cisco to have every policeman instructed to 
act as a traffic officer in addition to his other 
duties, whatever they may be, has been 
hailed wiith enthusiasm by San Francisco 
motordom in general and by the dealers in 
particular. 

The general sentiment seems to be that 
such a move, if properly carried out, would 
materially reduce the number of automobile 
accidents as no other one thing could po< 
sibly do. 

Among prominent San Francisco automo- 
bile distributors, who have expressed them' 
selves heartily in favor of the suggested laM 
enforcement method are C. C. Rand, dis- 
tributor of Jordan and Mercer cars here; 
Phillip S. Cole, president of the Haynes Auto 
Sales company; Frank 0. Renstrom, who 
handles the Premier, Grant, Briscoe, Atter- 
bury Truck and Twin City Tractor lines; G. 
A. Boyer, president of the Franklin Motor 
Car company; Tony Holbek, head of the 
Roamer Motor company; Herbert A. Seller 
of H. A. Seller company, Dorris and Paige 
distributors; E. W. Milburn, San Francisco 
manager for Greer-Robbins company, Hup- 
mobile and LaFayette distributors, and 
Charles Griffiths, Northern California dis- 
tributor for the new Ferris Six. 



This has been a busy week for the auto- 
mobile men in San Francisco. Every spare 
car on the "Row" was working a few days 
ago taking care of the Democratic delega- 
tions as they arrived to participate in the 
convention. The Motor Car Dealers' Asso- 
ciation was responsible for the way the dele- 
gates were met and delivered to their hotels 
through the aid of cars and drivers donated 
by them. More than five thousand arriving 
parties were taken care of in this way. 



Plans for the mystery meeting which will 
celebrate the sixth anniversary of the Ala- 
meda County Automobile Trade Association 
on the evening of July 15 are progressing 
rapidly, according to the latest advices from 
the office of Robert W. Martland, secretary 
of the association. 

"Meet at the Oakland city hall plaza at 
7:30 p. m. sharp, and bring plenty of gas," 
is the only information the members will get 
until they ctart for the "mystery." 



general, as Parker is well known throughout 
the entire Northern California territory. As 
wholesale manager of the Rose organization, 
Parker has been notably successful. 

His promotion came close upon the heels 
of his return from the East, where he had 
succeeded in talking the Chalmers factory 
out of 418 cars for Northern California. In 
order to get the stock rolling. Parker had to 
arrange for a Detroit to Toledo overland trip 
of all 418 of them. At Toledo the cars were 
loaded into 137 box cars and started for San 
Francisco. 

By the time they got here, and little time 
was lost en route, the Chalmers orders had 
piled up at every dealer's agency in the 
Rose territory, and practically the entire 
consignment had been disposed of, necessi- 
tating several large drive-aways at once. One 
of the largest of these was a drive-away of 
sixty-five cars to Oakland, to which point 
several dealers from the interior of the State 
came to get their cars. 



R. E. Parker has been appointed general 
sales manager of the Lou H. Rose company. 
Chalmers distributors, according to Lou H. 
Rose, president of the company. This an- 
nouncement is of interest to the trade in 



"Use your spark control level intelligently 
if you would insure the longevity of your 
motor car," advises Frank 0. Renstrom, 
Grant distributor for this territory. Many 
people needlessly shorten the lives of their 
cars, by failing to observe this warning, he 
believes. 

"The position of the spark lever need not 
be changed, in ordinary driving, except for 
unusual road conditions, after it is once set 
to run through a considerable range of 
speed," Renstrom says. 

"This condition is best found by the 
driver adjusting and experimenting with the 
particular range adapted to his type of car. 

"In going up a heavy grade, nine out of 
every ten drivers rush their car because they 
do not want to shift the gears. True, it is 
nice to skim over the top of a steep hill, but 
just how long will your engine stand for this 
abuse before it begins to voice its disgust in 
knocks and rattles? Just how much rubber 
has been chewed from the tires as they ob- 
tained traction for that rush? And just how 
much gasoline was consumed in the get- 
away? 

"The knock from an engine laboring up 
hill is due to the fact that the spark occurs 
on the compression stroke and the explosion 
meeting the piston tries to force it back, thus 
producing a sharp metallic thump. This 
knock would not occur on a level road unless 
the car was loaded, for the crankshaft is 
turning so rapidly that the piston has time to 
pass dead center and start on the down 
stroke by the time the pressure of the ex- 



plosion is effective. At all limes the spark 
should be kept as far advanced as possible 
without causing the engine to knock for a 
low set spark tends to overheat and car- 
bonize the engine. 

"Get acquainted with the sound of your 
engine. Determine the point of spark ad- 
vance which is most efficient and economical. 
By so doing you will obtain greater power at 
a less cost per mile." 



Dust has a strange way of penetrating 
even the most tightly fastened of joints, and 
if Mr. Motorist would get the best out of his 
car. it would behoove him to at all times 
keep dirt off his gears. Here is one thing 
about which he should never allow himself to 
get careless. 

"It is not so much that dirt does not look 
well, that it should be kept away from the 
working parts of the chassis, but because 
it eventually gets to a moving surface and 
starts rapid wear," warns E. W. Milburn of 
Greer-Robbins company, Hupmobile distribu- 
tors for California. 

"Every automobile has certain tightly se- 
cured points in addition to actual openings, 
and on taking some of the main assemblies 
apart you will find that there is almost as 
much dirt where there is not supposed to be 
any as there is in the places where you 
naturally expect to find some. 

"Take the timing gear case cover, for in- 
stance. Vibration may loosen a few of the 
holding nuts, allowing the cover to move 
away from the crankcase a small fraction of 
an inch. With an accumulation of dirt over 
the cover, some of the dirt is bound to gel to 
the gear teeth. 

"Dirt and lack of lubrication in front end 
gears are responsible for rapid wear and 
noisy operation. Kerosene baths are about 
the best 'tonic' for a motor troubled with 
dust. The 'bath' should include the crank- 
case as well as the parts you can see when 
you lift the hood. Dirty oil, oil with sedi- 
ment, old oil not changed for some time, are 
.nil causes of rapid engine wear. 

"How many owners ever see to it that the 
combination breather and oil filler is clean 
on the inside? In some designs there is every 
chance for a quantity of dirt to settle on the 
inside and this is washed down into the 
crankcase when the next oil filling is made. 

"Loss in efficiency and a premature trip to 
the repair shop, where cost of parts or re- 
placements will be higher than expected, will 
result from permitting an engine to become 
dirty. Take the average car and examine 
the outside of the ignition unit. The timers 
are usually covered with mud and dirt and 
this gets inside, cutting the segments, inter- 
fering with proper ignition and bringing 
about the need for a new timer in a few 
months. 



July 10, 1920 

"Look inside a timer that is generally 
dirty on the outside and one will find dirt 
also. Generators and starting motors on the 
average car do not get very much attention 
of any kind by the owner, but they, too, de- 
serve a good cleaning just as much as any 
other part of the car." 



DON'TS 

Here are a few important "don'ts" for 
motorists. If every owner-driver cut them 
out and pasted them in his hat, it might pre- 



ALADDIN 
STUDIO 
TIFFIN 
ROOM 

220 POST 7 FOURTH FLOOR 

SAN FRANCISCO 

m 

SPECIALIZING FIFTY CENT 
LUNCH 



HATTIE MOOSER 
M. C. MOOSER 



FIRE AND MARINE. 

Synopsis of the Annual Statement of the 

Detroit National Fire Insurance 

Co. of Detroit in the State of Michigan, on the 
31st day of December, 1919. made to the Insur- 
ance Commissioner of the State of California, pur- 
suant to law. 

ASSETS 

Real estate $ 7.221.05 

Mortgage! and collateral loans 2S4.0Vs.9O 

Bonds and slocks ... 136,450.45 

Cash in office and banks 56.119.54 

Agents' balances IO.i88.S4 
R'lls receivable taken for risks 

Other ledger assets 

Total ledger assets $414,238.48 

NON-LEDGER: 

Total interest and rents due or accrued.. $ Q .835.66 

Market value of securities over book value . 

Other non-ledger assets 7,294.39 

Cross assets 5| 1.168.53 

Deduct assets not admitted '172.00 

Total admitted assets $491,196.53 

1 1 \rtn mi s 

Net amovinl of unpaid losses and claims $ 30. 71'. 17 
Unearned premiums 44.144.40 

Ml other liabilities . 10.195.61 

Total liabilities (except capital 

and surplus) 85.053 18 

Capital 200.00000 

Surplus KM 

Total capital, surplus and other 

liabilitiea 4QI.IOfr.Ss 

PHILIP RRI ITMI'.YFR. 

President 

ORCE K MARCH. 

Ses-retarv 
The |. I v x. Pacific Coast Depart- 

ment nerv Street. San Francisco. Cal. 

Telephone Kearny 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

vent at least a few accidents, for an analysis 
of the automobile accidents that have 
occurred during the past year indicate that 
most of them come from the violation of the 
simplest of safety-first rules. Here is the 
"don't" list: 

Don't fail to give all other vehicles their 
share of the road under all conditions. 

Don't fail to give the proper signals when 
you are stopping, turning, or changing the 
course of your machine. 

Don't drive at night without lights. 

Don't pass any vehicle at an intersection. 

Don't pass street cars at a speed exceed- 
ing ten miles per hour. 

Don't exceed speed limits. 

Don't ever operate a car unless you have 
a driver's license in your own possession. 

Don't carry luggage so that it extends 
more than 12 inches to the left side. 

Don't fail to have a tail light lamp at 
night. 

Don't fail to have your headlights properly 
adjusted according to the law. 

Don't use a spotlight that violates the law. 

Don't fail to give aid in case of accident. 

"Did the captain do anything to clean up 
the precinct?" "Some say he got sixty thou- 
sand in a month." 



15 



TRADE F-F MARK 

"BATTERY BOOSTERS" 

ALTERNATING & DIRECT CURRENT 

SERVICE STATION SERVICE 
IN YOUR OWN GARAGE 




KEEP BATTERY ON CAR 

■ 

to tl e ni' 

The Sensation of Motordom 

Live County Distributors Wanted 

California Distributing Co. 

(HarotJ H Hartmetm) 
<"> MARK El 

Pk**t Ktarwi 



CLOCK 
REPAIRING 




ALL MAKES 
OF CLOCKS 
REPAIRED 



WATCH DEPARTMENT 
Chimes and complicated clocks a specialty 
Clocks kept in order by contract, town and 

country 

We carry an attractive line of new clocks 

Work guaranteed in every detail 

CALIFORNIA CLOCK CO. 

418-19 Whitney Bldg. 133 Geary Street 

Phone Garfield 2570 J. Topping, Manager 



Operators Both Sexes 



Phone Sutter 28,37 



SEVENTH FLOOR 
The Way to Health 

Chiropractic 

FOSTER & WRIGHT 

Palmer Chiropractors 

710-11-12-13-14 Gillette Bldg. 

830 Market St.. San Francisco, Calif. 
Chronic Nervous Diseases a Specially 

FREE CLINIC 9:00-10:00 A. M. 

INVESTIGATE 



HOTEL ST. MATTHEW 
AND GRILL 

217 Second Avenue. San Malco 

SPECIAL SUNDAY DINNER $1.00 
MEALS A LA CARTE 

Special attention paid to banquets, automobile 
par he* and tourists. The only first-class a la 
t arle restaurant in San Mateo. The hotel is 
entirely new; hot and cold water in every room. 
All well lighted. Room* with private bath. 
Price* moderate. Summer rate* given. Elevator 



AUTOMOBILE STARTING AND 
LIGHTING SYSTEMS 

Give Mh« factory results when given proper at- 
tention. We sneoalire on Electrical equipment, 
and guarantee satisfaction. 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

Brand & Cushman 

Phone Prospect 741 



W. W. HEALEY 

I ARY PUBLIC 

INSURANCE BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

Phone Kearny 391 Sao Francisco 



"Brevity is the soul of wit." observed the 
Sage. "I guess it is." agreed the Fool. "I 
never heard a witty sermon." 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 10. 1920 



Pleasure's Wand 



ORPHEUM ATTRACTIONS 

Joseph E. Howard, whose musical act was 
one of the features of last week's Orpheum 
bill, is prominent also on this week's pro- 
gram. Assisted by Ethelyn Clark, Max Ford, 
Jack King, and a number of beautiful girls, 
Howard presents the musical fantasy. "Chin 
Toy," in the course of which he delights the 
audience by rendering a number of his latest 
songs. 

Another feature is the musical farce 
"Kiss Me," in which Dorothea Sadlier, 
Isabelle Winlock and Harry Meyer compete 
for the honors, and which is featured by 
pretty girls, charming costumes, and alluring 
music. Buch brothers present a noteworthy 
act in the acrobatic performance called 
"Spilling the Beans," while another type of 
gymnastic act is to be seen in the Bartholdi 
comedy, in which fifty parrots, papageys and 
cockatoos perform. There is also much of 
interest in the act of Resista, a ninety-pound 
girl whom no one can lift; of Eddie Kane 
and Jay Herman, in a comedy dialogue; of 
Eary and Eary, in an Egyptian ring novelty 
performance; in "Before and After Mar- 
riage," a burlesque staged by John Gardner 
and Marie Hartman; and in the International 
Weekly, the screen feature. 



NEW ALCAZAR BILL 

Inez Ragan and Dudley Ayres, who have 
succeeded decisively in the leading roles at 
the Alcazar, will be seen next week in "On 
the Hiring Line," George C. Tyler's recent 
laughing hit. Mrs. Fessenden, ex-actress, 
does not like the country and drives the 
servants away, forcing her husband and step- 
daughter to do all the work. Fessenden 
swears he will get servants who will stick. 
He engages two private detectives, man and 
wife, to act as butler and cook. They 
stumble on a proposed elopement, and a 
mysterious love letter, and the whole house- 
hold, including several guests, are plunged 
into a whirlpool of comic cross purposes. 
There is a splendid cast, headed by Dudley 
Ayres as the distracted householder; Inez 
Ragan, the actress-stepmother; Jean Oliver 
and Ben Erway as the young elopers; Brady 
Kline, a temperamental actor; Rafael Bru- 
nette and Emily Pinter, as a flirtatious 
couple; Al Cunningham and Anna Mac- 
Naughton as the detective servants. 

"Peg 0' My Heart," the most phenomen- 
ally successful romantic comedy ever acted 
in America, will be given for the one week 
commencing Sunday, July 18. This is the 
beginning of a big summer drive of famous 
plays. 



ORPHEUM 

Four theatrical celebrities will hold forth 
at the Orpheum throughout all of next week 
starting Sunday matinee. These are Louise 
Dresser, Jack Gardner, Elsa Ryan and Clara 
Morton. 

The former two of these well known the- 
atrical people are working together in an act 
which is described as a cycle of individual 
songs. Both are well known for the manner 
in which they have put over songs in pro- 
ductions and vaudeville, and both hail from 
principal roles in leading musical produc- 
tions which enjoyed a nation-wide reputa- 
tion. Miss Dresser is a statuesque blonde of 
excellent appearance and personality. Gard- 
ner is one of the most likeable chaps on the 
stage, it is said. He is declared to have given 
a good account of himself in "The Chocolate 
Soldier" and "Madame Sherry," both of 
which productions owe much of their success 
to his cleverness, it is claimed. 

Elsa Ryan, in a neat skit entitled "Peg 
for Short," will demonstrate her skill in de- 
piction of a dramatic role which has won her 
much favorable comment throughout her 
Orpheum tour. 

Clara Morton, formerly one of "The Four 
Mortons," one of the widest known families 
of vaudeville, will return as a single in the 
same natural character which established her 
reputation when a member of the family act. 

Other favored twins among the Orpheum's 
newcomers next week will be Harrison 
Greene and Katherine Parker in a minstrel 
afterpiece provided for them by James H. 
Morton, Palo and Palet, two thoroughly 
finished musicians and the Novelty Clintons 
in an unusual leaping act. "Kiss Me," 
musical comedy, holds over. Topics of the 
Day and weekly events complete the bill. 



tie general 



HARD TIMES FOR THEATRES 

The report comes from London that these 
are hard times in the theatre business. Of 
the score and more theatres in the West End 
only four, it is said, are doing a paying 
business now. This is due to the 
tendency to economize. 

After a long run at the Lyric, Richard 
Walton Tully's play, "The Bird of Paradise." 
goes to another West End theatre. A French 
version of it will be produced in Paris during 
the coming autumn. 

The unprecedented run of "Chu Chin 
Chow," more than four years at His 
Majesty Theatre, is coming to a close. Af- 
fected by the general falling off in attend- 
ance at the theatres, the play's receipts have 
decreased below the figures that justify its 
continued tun. "Chu Chin Chow" will be 



succeeded by a play of the same character 
and locale entitled "Mecca," which it was 
originally intended should be produced first 
in New York. 

Kneblock's play, "Tiger! Tiger!" is re- 
ceived with indifference by the London 
critics, who do not recognize the playwright's 
purpose or his method of working it out. H. 
B. Jalkley, in the Times, maintains that the 
theme is not suitable for stage treatment and 
writes: 

"It is just a little dull because we want to 
know the inner selves of the parties and how 
their relation reacts on their minds and feel- 
ings, and the stage is not the best medium 
for imparting this knowledge," He adds: 

"It gets only second best acting while it 
needs the best." 

The Beecham Opera at Covent Garden, 
composed mainly of British artists, has en- 
tirely failed to replace the Italian Grand 
Opera of pre-war days, either artistically or 
socially. There are loud laments that Lon- 
don should be without first class opera such 
as New York supports. 



HE WASN'T FOOLED 

"The editor declines this drawing with re- 
grets." 

"Regrets!" sneered the artist. "Bah! I 
heard him laughing as he sent you out." 



Ts«H FRAHCI SCC 



I 




J OvfrWv&vaut ^l 



MATINEE DAILY 
Next Week-Starting Sunday Matinee 

Phone Douglas 70 

TBE MUSICAL COMEDY STABS 

LOUISE DRESSER 

JACK GARDNER 

ELSA RYAN 

Rodney Rations In "Peg for Shorl " 

GREENE & PARKER PALO .v. TALET 

"KISS ME" 

UP-TO-DATE MUSICAL FARCE 

ANITA DIAZ MONKEYS NOVELTY CLINTONS 

CLARA MORTON 

Of the Four Morton* in a Solo fongalogue 

Evening Prlees— 25c, :,0r. 75c. $1 

Matinee Prices— 25c, .Sue. T.'.e 

( Except Saturdays. Sundays and Holidays) 



ALCAZAR 

This Week — Ideal Romance 
"THE CINDERELLA MAN- 
WEEK COM. NEXT SUN. MAT. JULY II 
New York's Recent Jolly Comedy Hit 

"ON THE HIRING LINE" 

Comic Exposition of the Servant Problem 

NEW ALCAZAR COMPANY 

DUDLEY AYRES— INEZ RAGAN 

SUN. MAT.. JULY 18 SPECIAL EVENT 

The Greatest of Romantic Comedies 

"PEG O' MY HEART" 

Millions Have Laughed and Cried with Peg in this 

Wonderfully Appealing Heart Story. 

SOON—THE TAILOR MADE MAN" 

Every Evening. Mats.. Sunday. Thurs., Sal. 



July 10, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



Wedding Presents: The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell streets. 



U. S. GARAGE 
750 Bush St. Phone Garfield 713 



PEARSON GARAGE 

345 Bush St. Phone Douglas 2120 

Repair Shop and Annex 350 Bush St. 



Largest and Most Complete Garages in 
the West 







N. W CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



Pioneer 
Carpet Cleaning Works 

Renovating Sewing Laying Sizing 

Especially Equipped for Handling 

Valuable Rugs and Carpets 

Prompt MOTOR TRUCK SERVICE 

Established 1868 Tel. Doug. 3084 

353 Tehama St. 



EPPLER'S 

BAKERY and LUNCH 

886 Geary Street 



Branch Confectionery 

SUTTER and POWELL STREETS 

Phone Douglas 1912 



ATTRACTIVE BILL AT ALCAZAR 

"The Cinderella Man," this week's attrac- 
tion at the Alcazar, is another play of "The 
Poor Little Rich Girl" type. It is varied 
with the themes of the rich man, the starving 
poet, and romance in a garret. A rich girl, 
lonely and unhappy in spite of her wealth, 
plays Santa Claus to a penniless poet by 
whose verse she is attracted. As one could 
not fail to guess, the plot develops into a 
love story between the rich girl and the poet 
— but there is a delightful interval, during 
which the poet takes the rich girl for her 
own companion, and she does her best to 
prevent him from seeing his error. Doubt- 
lags. Dudley Ayres is a decided success in 
experience starving and freezing, he has a 
prejudice against wealth, and particularly 
against its possessors, and so the rich girl 
is naturally anxious to prevent her lover from 



learning that she is guilty of being an heiress. 
She pleads with her father to disinherit her, 
but alas! in vain! The heartless parent 
refuses to consider such an idea, and the 
rich girl cannot escape the encumbrance of 
her wealth. However, it all ends happily, 
and horrified as the lover cannot help being 
upon learning his benefactress' true identity, 
he shows a truly magnanimous spirt, and 
forgives her. 

The play abounds in laughs, and provides 
excellent entertainment. While not particu- 
larly novel, the plot is interesting, the situa- 
tions are not forced, and the interest never 
lags. Dudley Ayres is a decided succsess in 
the part of the starving but hopeful poet, 
and Inez Ragan is no less successful in the 
role of the rich girl who helps him. Al Cum- 
mingham brings down many laughs in the 
character of Primrose. 



■Z MWg/mWSM PMWWWTWTO^ 




%A RYAN 

1,1/ Apptar m "Pcf f«r Short" (Vert H'eck at the Orphtum 



; — . 1 




18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 10. 1920 



ADAPTING PLAYS FOR THE MOVIES 

As time goes on, the movies seem to be 
depending more and more upon the legiti- 
mate drama or upon the novel for their plots. 
Evidence of this fact is contained in a recent 
list of British films being prepared by the 
Ideal Film company. This list is composed 
entirely of picture versions of books and 
plays. 

Among the books are "The Pickwick 
Papers," Sir Walter Besant's "All Sorts and 
Conditions of Men," Lord Lylton's "Money," 
Guy de Maupassant's "The Diamond Neck- 
lace," and George Gissing's "Demos"; and 
among the plays, H. F. Maltby's "The 
Rotters," Dion Clayton Calthrop's "The Old 
Country," and Walter Howard's "The Prince 
and the Beggar-Maid." 

From the point of view of the authors of 
the books and plays — if they are still alive — 
this system has a good deal to be said for it. 
Apart from the actual monetary advantage, 
a work that is moribund or forgotten may be 
given a new lease of life by converion 
into a film. An instance occurred when there 
was shown privately a film version of Pi- 
nero's comedy "The Gay Lord Quex." It 
follows the play very closely; it takes no 
liberties with the text; and altogether is an 
example of how this kind of thing should be 
done, if it is necessary to do it at all. 

Though the film's dependence on novels 
and stage plays is not to be encouraged, 
there is a strong inclination to tolerate this 
practice after having sat through on "orig- 
inal" film. The conclusion is then apt to be 
driven home that the film, like any other 
nauveau riche, might do a good deal worse 
than model itself on its more aristocratic 
neighbors. 

In England they do not take kindly to the 
makeshift, haphazard sort of thing so often 
allowed to pass for a motion picture drama. 
The following criticism, from an English 
paper, will serve as proof of this fact: 

Two films — both "native" productions, do 
not borrow from one novel or one play, but 
from many novels and many plays. In the 
first, "False Evidence," we are shown a 
primitive community, chiefly composed of 
those strong, silent men who are so much 
admired in the film, but would be intolerable 
in real life. In this community they have a 
habit of betrothing children to each other 
directly they are born, something after the 
manner of entering a horse for the Derby. 
The system is not very successful, and things 
come to such a pass that the heroine, who is 
the reverse of silent, stabs with a knife the 
strong and silent gentleman who was be- 
trothed to her at birth and had taken to 
strong and primitive drinks. The hero, yet 
another strong and silent man, loves the 
heroine, but of course she cannot go back 
on her pledge. What is to be done? The 
drunken gentleman to whom the heroine is 



betrothed must be got rid of. A tree con- 
veniently falls on his head, he dies, and 
leaves the road clear for the marriage of the 
lovers. It is all very poor stuff indeed. 

The other film, "Shouldering Embers," 
tells of a wife who deserts her husband when 



his business fails him, and marries another 
man with a little more money. With her 
she takes her infant boy. The original hus- 
band comes down in the world with a rush, 
becomes a tramp, and eventually meets his 
)wn son. 



Recenlly insurance companies have decided that when losses of private stocks of liquor in the resi- 
dence of the assured are burned they will adjust the losses on the basis of prices which the owner 
paid. In order to dispense with any arguments, such stocks might well be written under a valued 
form of policy. 

Bankers & Shippers Insurance Company of New York 



Capital $1,000,000 

FIRE— AUTOMOBILE 

Pacific Coast Department, DIXWELL DAVENPORT, 

Insurance Exchange Building, San Francisco 

Frank M. Burnside, Manager Automobile Department 



Policyholder's Surplus $2,000,000 
Manager 



Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 



CAPITAL $3,000,000 
FIRE 



AUTOMOBILE 



ASSETS $22,500,000 
MARINE 



The Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD 



BENJAMIN J. SMITH. Mgr. 



CHARTERED 1850 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

369 Pine Street, San Francisco 



FREDERICK S. DICK. Asst. Mgr. 









THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 


"The Largest Fire Insurance Go. in America" 

FIRE AUTOMOBILE WINDSTORM 


LIBERAL CONTRAC 


TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 

TS REASONABLE RATES 










Don't Experiment With Your Eyes 

CONSULT 

DR. GEORGE MAYERLE 

Exclusive Eyesight Specialist 
And Expert Optometrist 

Scientific Eye Examinations. 




^?k ■ B 


OVER 25 YEARS 
IN SAN FRANCISCO 






MAYERLE'S Eyewater 
A Marvelous Eye Ionic 
For Children or Adults 

At Druggists 50 Cents 
By Mail 65 Cents 

San Francisco, California. 
960 Market St. 









Graney's Billiard Parlor 



Finest in the World 
Perfect Ventilation 
924 Market Street 
61 Eddy Street 



EDDIE GRANEY, Proprietor 



DIVIDEND NOTICES 



BANK OF ITALY, southeast corner Mont- 
gomery and Clay sts. (Market si. branch, junc- 
tion Market, Turk and Mason sts) — For the 
half year ending June 30, 1920, a dividend has 
been declared al the rate of four (4) per cent 
per annum on all savings deposits, payable on 
and after July I, 1920. Dividends not called for 
are added to and bear the same rate of interest 
as the principal from July 1, 1920. Deposits 
made on or before July 10, 1920, will earn 
interest from July 1, 1920. 

A. P. GIANNINI, President. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 316 Montgomery 
street, San Francisco. — For the half year ending 
June 30, 1920, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on 
savings deposits, payable on and after Thursday, 
July 1, 1920. Dividends not called for are added 
to and bear the same rate of interest as the 
principal from July 1 , 1 920. Money deposited 
on or before July 10, 1920, will earn interest from 
July I, 1920. 

EDWARD P. OAKLEY. Sec 'y. 

ITALIAN-AMERICAN BANK, southeast corner 
Montgomery and Sacramento sts. North Beach 
branch, Columbus av, and Broadway. — For the 
half year ending June 30, 1920, a dividend has 
been declared at the rate of four (4) per cent per 
annum on all savings deposits, payable on and 
after July 1, 1920. Dividends not called for will 
be added to the principal and bear the same rate 
of interest from July I, 1920. Deposits made on 
or before July 10, 1920, will earn interest from 
July 1, 1920. 

A. SBARBORO, President. 

FIRST FEDERAL TRUST COMPANY, Mont- 
gomery and Post sts. Branch, 706 Market, oppo- 
site 3d — For the half year ending June 30, 1920, 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of four 
(4) per cent per annum on all savings deposits, 
payable on and after July I, 1920. Dividends 
not called for are added to the deposit account 
and earn dividend from July 1, 1920. Deposits 
made on or before July 10, 1920, will earn 
interest from July 1 , 1 920. 

JAMES K. MOFFITT. Cashier 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN 
SOCIETY, corner Market, McAllister and Jones 
sts. — For the half year ending June 30, 1920, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of four 
(4) per cent per annum on savings deposits, pay- 
able on and after Thursday, July I. 1920. Div- 
idends not drawn will be added to depositors* 
accounts, become a part thereof, and will earn 
dividends from July I, 1920. Deposits made on 
or before July 10, 1920, will draw interest from 
July I, 1920. 

R. M. TOBIN. Secretary. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS BANK. 7S3 Market 
street, near Fourth. —For the half year ending 
June 30, 1920, a dividend has been declared at 
the rale of four (4) per cent per annum on all 
savings deposits, payable on and after Thunday. 
July I, 1920. Dividends not called for art added 
to and bear the same rate of interest a* the prin- 
cipal from July 1. 1920. Money deposited on or 
before July 10, 1920, will draw interest from 
July 1/1920. 

H. C. KLFVFSAHL, Cashi-r. 

UNION TRUST COMPANY OF SAN FRAN- 
CISCO, junction of Market street. Grant 
avenue and O'Farrell street — For the half year 

. ending June 30, 1920. a dividend has teen de- 
clared at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum 
on all savings CKpoaits, payable on and after 
Thursday. Julv I, 1Q20. Dividends not called for 
are added to and hear the same rate of interest as 
the principal from luly I. 1920. Money deposited 
on or hefore lulv 10. |920. will earn intetesl from 
Julv I. 1920 

F. J. BRICKAVEDEL. Cashier. 



"LE PERE LA CERISE" 

The sensation of the hour in smart Paris 
is the story of Father Cherry, "Le Pere la 
Cerise." This is the nickname of an old 
newspaper vendor whose startling adventures 
have quite put into the shade such back 
numbers as the fall of the president from his 
train. He is an old newspaper vendor who 
leaped into fame by being ignominously 
arrested while seated on a bench in the 
Tuileries park and engaged in the unusual 
but no doubt pleasant, experience of count- 
ing what appeared to be innumerable bank- 
notes into a greasy bag. Father Cherry 
was shabby, incredibly dirty, haggard, and 
looked altogether the wrong person to be 
engaged in such an occupation. At the 
police station he explained that the money 
was legitimately his, that it amounts to some- 
thing like £5000, and — still more marvelous 
— that he had won it by means of systematic 
betting on races in the preceding three 
weeks. 

On inquiry this turned out to be true, and, 
with profuse apologies he was released. But 
his troubles were by no means ended. The 
press got hold of the story, and at the races 
next day when Father Cherry turned up he 
was surrounded by a great crowd of eager 
backers, determined to know his secret and 
which horses he fancied for the afternoon. 
Leaving his hat in the clutches of the laugh- 
ing, superstitious croud, he fled to the 
fashionable enclosure, only to find the same 
annoying interest as to his sporting intentions 
among the top-hatlcd and the silk-gowned. 
Fuel was added to the fire by the next morn- 
ing's announcement that he had again 
backed three very comfortable winners and 
won another ££00. 

Since that time he has disappeared, though 
enterprising young journalists profess to have 
discovered him again at the Longchamps 
races, with his beard shaved and his hair 
trimmed in disguise. He has turned into 
something like legend. Paris has christened 
him "Le Pere la Cerise," which in itself con- 
tains the whole chapter of racing supersti- 
tion. Bad luck in French argot is called 
guignc. signifying the small cherry known as 
the blackheart. Bu' it is a word never used 
for fear of misfortune by initiates, who use 
as an equivalent the less magic word of 
cerise — a short and sweet euphemism. So 
Father Cherry has come into that short-lived, 
exuberant thing Pans popularity, and is more 
talked about that Krassin or Lloyd George — 

FRENCH-AMERICAN B-NNK OF SAVINGS 
ngs Department 108 Sutter St. — For the 
half year ending June 30. 1920. a dividend has 
been declared at the rate of four (4) per cent 
per annum on all deposits, payable on and after 
Julv I. 1920. Dividends not called for are added 
to and bear the same rate of interest as the 
principal from July I, 1920. Deposits made on 
or before luly 10. I ll 20. will earn interest from 

lulv I. 192 

LEON BOCQL'ERAZ. President. 



SUMMONS 

105936 

In the Superior Court of the Slate of California 

in and for the City and County of San Francisco. 
Olga Elizabeth Ennis, Plaintiff, 

vs. 
John Cradock Ennis, Defendant. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the 
State of California in and for the City and County 
of San Francisco, and the complaint filed in the 
office of the County Clerk of said City and County. 

The people of the State of California send greet- 
ing to John Cradock Ennis and Mrs. J. Avrillaud, 
Defendants. 

You are hereby required to appear in an action 
brought against you by the above named Plaintiff in 
the Superior Court of the Slate of California, in 
and for the City and County of San Francisco, and 
to answer the Complaint filed therein within ten days 
(exclusive of the day of service) after the service on 
you of [his summons, if served within this City and 
County; or if served elsewhere within thirty days. 

The said action is brought to obtain a judgment 
and decree of this Court dissolving the bonds of 
matrimony now existing between plaintiff and de- 
fendant, on the ground of defendant John Cradock 
Ennis' adultery with said Mrs. J. Avrillaud, and of 
said John Cradock Ennis' desertion of plaintiff, also 
for general relief, as will more fully appear in the 
Complaint on file, to which special reference is 
hereby made. 

And you are hereby notified that, unless you ap- 
pear and answer as above required, the said Plain- 
tiff will take judgment for any moneys or damages 
demanded in the Complaint as arising upon contract, 
or will apply to the Court for any other relief de- 
manded in the Complaint. 

Given under my hand and the Seal of the Super- 
-or Court of the State of California, in and for the 
City and County of San Francisco, this 15th day of 
April A. D. 1920. 

(Seal) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By L. I WELCH. Deputy Clerk 

Frank D. Macbeth. 508 Humboldt Bank Bid".. San 

Francisco, Cal.. Attorney for Plaintiff. 



United States Branch 
Synopsis of the Annual Satement of 

The Palatine Insurance Co., Ltd. 

of London in England on the 3 1st day of Decem- 
ber. 1919. made to the Insurance Commissioner of 
the Stale of California. Pursuant to law. 

ASSETS 

Real Estate $ 

Mortgages and collateral loans 

Bonds and stocks 3.209.034.51 

Cash in office and banks 962 

balances . C4fl.473.39 

Bills receivable taken for risks.- 253.51 

Other ledger assets 64,451.17 



Total ledger assels $4,896,445.08 

NON-LEDGER: 

Total interest and rents due or accrued $ 35.047.00 
Market value of securities over book 

value 
Other non-ledger assets 



Gross assets $4,931,492.08 

Deduct assels not admitted 258.778 .42 



Total admitted assels $4,672,713.66 

I I ABILITIES 
Net amount of unpaid losses and 
cla:ms .. 



Unearned premiums 
All other liabilities .. 

Total labilities 

Surp! 



$ 314.1 

. 2.604.491.30 

1 32 . 

.$3,050 " 

. 1.621.925.36 



Total capital, surplus and other 
liabilities $4,672,713.66 

A. H. WRAY. U. S Manager. 




i Painted for American Chide Co. by Neysa Ma Mem, Copyrt%ht t 1920, 







<&KM#mm%totttx*tt> 



SATURDAY, JULY 17, 19 



p«WJ»W»/WWWMMimm»»MW«M 



When Summer Smiles 

Remember Winter's Frown 



u 




The prudent man looks beyond his immediate wants and lays by a 
store of necessary things for future use. 

He lets no opportunity go by to provide ahead for the future comfort 
and welfare of his family. 

His forethought is rewarded not alone in comfort realized, but in 
money saved through timely buying. 

Builders, Look to the Future Now 

Summer favors your building operations and offers the golden time in 
which to prepare for winter needs. 

That new house, begun or contemplated, will not afford the comfort 
you anticipate if not heated properly. 

The besl time to install a heating plant is during building conslrudion, 
when it can be done with a minimum of labor and expense. 

Let us help you plan the heating installation and lay out the preliminary 
work that can be mosl economically done NOW. 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company 

San Francisco, Cal. 



445 Sutter Street 



San Francisco District 






uuau,.,. 



Telephone Sutter 6654 



Importers 



GEO. W. GASWELL GO, 

COFFEE AND TEA 

Spices. Baking Powder, Flavoring 

Extracts 

442-452 Second Street, San Francisco 



For that stubborn cough 
Use Old Snake Doctor's Cough Remedy 

SNAKE DRUG CO. 

Formerly G. Leipnilz & Co. 

Now Localed at 

127-129 KEARNY ST. 



MacRORIE - McLAREN CO. 

FLORISTS. NURSERYMEN 

and 
LANDSCAPE ENGINEERS 

141 Powell Street, San Francisco 

Nurseries: San Maleo 

Phone San Maleo 1002 

Phone Douglas 4946 and Palace Holel 



A. W. BEST ALICE BEST 

BEST'S 

ART SCHOOL 

1625 California Street 

Life Classes — Day and Night 

Illustrating Sketching Painting 



TIRES VULCANIZING 

THOMAS H. ELKINGTON 

Distributor for 

Kelly-Springfield Tires 

Long Mileage Tires and Second Hand Tires 

865 POST ST.. Near Hyde 

Phone PROSPECT 1566 




FIREPROOF 

STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1636 Market St. 

Bet. Franklin and Gough 
Tel. Park 271 San Francisco 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of Pro- 
prietors 



Aggregate Assets. 30th 
Sept. 1919 




$20,000,000.00 
16.000,000.00 

20,000.000.00 



$335,181,247.00 



SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E., General Manager 

340 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States, New Zealand, Fiji, Papua (New 

Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australian Banking 

Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Aranged. 

Head Office: London Office: 

GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET. E. C. 2 

Agents: 
Bank of California, National Assn., Anglo 6c London-Paris Nal'I Bank, Crocker Nat'l Bank 



Direct Foreign Banking* Service 

Importers and exporters employing the facilities of our Foreign Department incur none 
of the risks incident to inexperience or untried theory in the handling of their overseas 
transactions. 

For many years we have provided Direct Service reaching all the important money 
and commercial centers of the civilized world. 

The excellence of that service is evidenced by its preference and employment by rep- 
resentative concerns at the East and other banking centers throughout the United States. 

RESOURCES OVER ONE HUNDRED TWENTY MILLION DOLLARS 

THE ANGLO & LONDON-PARIS NATIONAL BANK 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO. CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 

STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and at LONDON. ENO; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXfCO 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE. 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Manager W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

Member of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement and 7th Avenue 

HA1GHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

DECEMBER 31, 1919 

Assets $66,840,376.95 Capital Actually Paid Up $ 1,000.000.00 

Deposits 63.352,269.17 Reserve and Contingent Funds 2.488,107.78 

Employees' Pension Funde $330,951.36 

OFFICERS 

IOHN A. BUCK. President 

GEO. TOURNY. Vice-Pres. and Managei A. H. R. SCHMIDT, Vice-Pres. and Cashier 

E. T KRUSE. Vice-President A. H. MULLER. Secretary 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN. Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL. Assistant Cashier 

G. A. BELCHER. Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTE1N. Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYER. Manager Mission Branch W. C. HF.YER. Manager Park-Presidio Dist. Branch 

O. F. PAULSEN. Manager Haight Street Branch 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JOHN A. BUCK E. T. KRUSE I. N. WALTER A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY A. H. R. SCHMIDT HUGH GOODFELLOW E. N. VAN BERBEN 

E. A. CHRISTENSEN ROBERT DOLLAR L. S. SHERMAN 

GOODFELLOW, EELLS, MOORE & ORRICK. General Attorneys 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856. 




TER 



Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. XCVIII. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., SATURDAY, JULY 17, 1920 



No. 2 



Impressions and Expressions 



Having set afloat his "Third Party" 

cockleshell on the troubled pool of politics, 
Brother Hearst will probably start in to 
heave bricks at it, and thus keep up his repu- 
tation. 

¥ 3f> Sp 

An awful fate for Bob La Follette to 

be singled out as the main guy of Hearst's 
"Also Rans." Poor Bob! He deserved 
better. 

If Carl Wanderer had only committed 

that atrocious double-murder in Chicago, be- 
fore the Bolsheviki boys nominated Debs for 
president, he might have been selected. All 
that can be done for him now is to make a 

hero out of him. 

¥ * * 

The Irish Republic is functioning 

normally. Before President De Valera has 
been installed in the Green House at Dublin, 
several illustrious but dissatisfied patriots in 
New York are challenging him to step on the 
tails of their coals. Whirroo! 

* ¥ ¥ 

Several recent occurrences suggest 

the inquiry what availeth it to identify the 
finger prints on the stolen bottles when the 
contents have vanished? 

Cox and Roosevelt are to be fratern- 
ally received on Sunday al I he While 
House by the president and the Democratic 
compaign outlined. Is that to be considered 
a knock or a boost for the ticket? 

* * * 

The so-called "Fusion Party" is 

likely to be named the Confusion Party, 
as every bunch of reformers denied the 
center of the stage retires in disgust. The 
crazy single-taxers bolted first. 

* * * ~— - 

Sam Gompers says he has hope in the 

Democrats — which is more than the Demo- 
crats have in him this year of muddled 
politics. 



The Russian Bolsheviks having wal- 
loped the daylights out of the Poles, 
threaten to make them eat crow for five long 
years. The worst of that is that more of the 
defeated goulashers than ever will head for 
the United States. 

* ¥ ¥ 

In old times the Prohibition nominee 

for president sometimes got as many as a 
whole hundred votes in the United States. 
Yet the cold-water push stuck to it and over- 
turned the Constitution of the United States 
by slick work. There is a moral in it. 
¥ ¥ * 

As La Follette refused to have any- 
thing to do with the Third Party boys, they 
selected Max Parley P. Christenson of Salt 
Lake as their nominee for president. His 

particular brand of Bolshevism is in doubt. 
¥ ¥ * 

Both Labor and Prohibition are in 

politics this year and each of them will regret 
that they did not keep out. 

Cummings hints that Cox will stump 

the country this year. They will all have 
their coals off soon, or be lost in the shuffle. 

* * * 

How did Uncle Sam lose his nerve 

and grow so scared of a bunch of Japs and 
Bolshevik Slovaks that he can't sleep nights? 
according to all the officcseekers who are 

hollering their heads off. 

* * * 

"Lay low, boys!" is the injunction in 

Los Angeles, where they are doing all they 
know how, lo work up a printers' strike in 
San Francisco. Every strike here builds a 
new row of rattletrap houses in the Iowa 
annex. 

* * * 

Sam Shortridge continues to gain 

strength in his canvass for United Stales 
senator. It will be gross ingratitude if the 
Republicans of California fail to rally to Sam 
Shortridge's support this year. 



The taxeating supervisors are not 

scoring on Assessor John Ginty, by pretend- 
ing lo believe city property is not sufficiently 
assessed. Ginty is one — almost the only one 
— in the city hall who does not make a fool 
of himself every time he opens his mouth 
on municipal problems. Why don't the tax- 
payers have a recall election and put Ginty 

at the head of city business? 
¥ * * 

Either John Bull or the Associated 

Press is running opposition lo funny Irving 
Cobb. "England warns Soviet Russia thai 
war with the Poles must stop," is the latest 
joke. What have the Allies been doing for 
two years but threatening Russia, and they 
might as well have been singing "Rule 
Britannia" to a lamppost. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

The lively race riot in the English 

seaport of Hull, is attributed to the extra 
fine discrimination of negro sailors in select- 
ing (heir white consorts. As miscegenation 
is rather an old story in Europe, where the 
color of a man's skin casts no discredit on his 
coin, the Hull rumpus must have had some- 
thing besides amorous sentiment back of it. 
Is the negro complicating labor troubles in 
England ? 

Looks to us as if the Democrats arc 

pulling a whole lot of weight on that Wilson 
Irealy plank. Aren't the Republicans 
manocuvering them loward a slippery posi- 
tion and a hard fall? 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

Isn't it about lime that the military 

nations became wise to their inability to 
conquer Russia. Let's see! From 1853 to 
1856 the allies of that day — Great Britain, 
France. Turkey and Sardinia — warred on 
Russia in the Crimea, and finally sneaked 
back home to make the bluff that they 
hadn't bitten off more than they could chew. 
¥ ¥ ¥ 

When Uncle Sam was only knee high 

to a grasshopper he had big burly John Bull 
on the run for 'ome, and now when our 
uncle is about the strongest thing in creation, 
any off-colored bunch of coolies seems to 
give him cold feet. Take some Bunker Hill 
tonic, uncle. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 17, 1920 



Editorial Opinion 





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TURMOIL IN MIKADO'S REALM 

IF WE could always get the other fellow's 
point of view how differently we should 
act in innumerable cases, and how many 
alarms we should escape. Life would be 
much calmer but for unnecessary appre- 
hensions based on misconstruction or ignor- 
ance of the real attitude of others. 

While some of our statesmen and pub- 
licists are endeavoring to arouse the people 
to fear of Japan's militarist tendencies at the 
present moment the fact is made known by 
press dispatches that Mikadoland is actually 
in turmoil because of the prevalent demo- 
cratic trend of thought among its people. 
While we are being told that California is 
threatened with industrial invasion by Japa- 
nese the little brown men who are already 
here fully realize that they cannot stay if 
the American people do not want them, and 
they are seriously considering the wisdom 
of migrating to more hospitable lands, pos- 
sibly in South America, maybe in Mexico. 
What if the 100,000 Japanese now in the 
State, who are being told that they are un- 
desirable and may be denied the right to own 
land here, should pull up stakes and move on 
to other countries where their thrift and in- 
dustry would be welcomed? What would 
become of our farms and our crops, which 
white men are deserting for the less arduous 
tasks and pleasanter lives of the cities? 

The real state of mind either of the 
Japanese in America or of those in Japan 
plainly is entirely misunderstood by the poli- 
ticians who are hastening to make known 
their opposition to Japanese presence in 
America, and their belief that militarism in 
Japan is likely soon to lead to a conflict of 
arms between Japan and the United Stales. 
Within a week the Japanese Diet has been 
thrown into a state of turmoil by fierce on- 
slaughts of the opposition because of mili- 
tarist tactics of what is denounced by 
leaders of thought in the legislative body as 
a "clique." Former Minister of Justice 
Ozaki, just back from a visit to America 
and Europe, declared that only by the over- 
throw of militarism could the good repute 
of Japan be restored in the world. Class 
strife, the anti-Japanese agitation in Cali- 
fornia and the Siberian policy of the Govern- 



ment were topics of the bitter debate, which 
reached a dramatic climax when Ozaki de- 
clared his determination to abandon both 
parties and devote his energies and influence 
to the defeat of militarism in Japan. 

Democracy in Japan is strong because not 
confined to the proletariat; as is so often the 
case. It is strongly entrenched in high 
places. Men like Ozaki, familiar with world 
conditions, know too well what would be the 
result of a military debacle by Japan. It 
would make of her an eastern Ishmacl. 
Financiers look first at the nation's treasury, 
then regard the resources of the United 
States and Great Britain and reject all 
dreams of conquest. 



One of the efforts of our home alarmists 
is to create the fear that the few Japanese 
women in the State are likely to out-do the 
many white women in progeny, and in thr.t 
way dominate the industries of California. 
In this the Sacramento Bee has been es- 
pecially active, and lately it misused data 
compiled by Registrar L. E. Ross, of the 
Bureau of Vital Statistics of the California 
State Board of Health, to show that the 
Japanese birth rate in the State was assum- 
ing threatening proportions. The figures it 
quoted from Mr. Ross' compilation werf 
these: 

Total births 56,521 

Rate per 1000 17 

Total population 3,234,209 

Total births 56,521 

Birth rate per 1000 17.5 

Total pop. except Japs 3,138,209 

Total births 52.063 

Birth rate per 1000 16.59 

Total Japanese population 96,000 

Total births 4,458 

Birth rate per 1000 46.44 

Total white births 5 1 ,3 1 6 

Births other than whites and 
Japanese (Chinese. Negroes 

and Indians) 747 

The Bee then adds: 

Note that the Japanese, with one 
thirty-third of the population, produce 
one-twelfth as many births as all other 
races combined, including the whites; 
that is to say, the Japanese birth rate 



per thousand is almost three times as 
great as that of all the other races in 
California combined, the respective 
birth rates being 16.59 and 46.44. 

Note that the total number of white 
births in California in 1919 was 51,316. 
Of births other than white there were 
5205, and of that number 4458 were 
Japanese, and the balance, 747, divided 
among all the other races represented, 
Chinese, Negroes, Indians, etc. That is 
to say, among the races other than 
white in California the Japanese are fur- 
nishing six times as many births as all 
•he others combined! In 1908, after 
adoption of the gentlemen's agreement, 
the Japanese births numbered 455. 
Their annual births have multiplied 
since then ten fold, and still steadily 
increase. Does that furnish food for 
reflection to Americans who realize the 
danger from an overwhelming flood of a 
non-assimilable race, superior in eco- 
nomic competition? 

Yes. That invites, in facl compels, the 
reflection that the deductions drawn from 
the figures of the Registrar of Vital Statistics 
of the California State Board of Health is a 
very disingenuous one, tending to create a 
misleading impression. And it is of a piece 
with much other anti-Japanese propaganda 
recently perpetrated for the purpose of 
barring out the only source of labor supply 
the State has to look to at a time of great 
need for hr.nds with which to create and save 
its crops. 

There are few things more deceiving than 
the trick of comparing proportions. If one 
man were occupying a house capable of ac- 
commodating hundreds and in the course of 
a year one other man should move into it, 
it would be indubitable that there had been 
during the year an increase in occupants r.s 
great as 100 per cent. If 100 men were 
occupying a building capable of accommo- 
dating hundreds and in the course of a year 
forty more should move in, it would be im- 
possible to deny that there had been during 
the year an increase of but 40 per cent. 
Handled as Editor McClatchy handles the 
vital statistics above set forth these figures 
might be used to make it appear that the 
house that had gained in a year only one 
new occupant was filling up faster than the 
one that had gained forty occupants in the 
same period. In this case Editor McClatchy 
would say with superior perspicacity: "Can 
you not see that 100 per cent is greater than 
•'0 per cent?" Verily, it is so. But it is 
not significant. 

It scunds rather alarming to say that the 
birth rate of the Japanese is greater than the 
birth rate of all the other Asiatics in Califor- 
nia. But it is not important, because there 
are comparatively few Asiatics other than 
Japanese in the State. 



July 17. 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Let it be conceded that the Japanese birth 
rate is greater in California than is the rate 
of births among Americans. What of it, at 
the present stage of the peopling of the 
State? 

THE VITAL FACT IS THAT WE ARE 
OBTAINING BY PROPAGATION 51,316 
WHITE INHABITANTS IN THE STATE 
PER ANNUM, WHILE WE ARE BEING 
GIVEN BY THE SAME PROCESS ONLY 
4458 ADDITIONAL JAPANESE. 

How long, we should like to ask, would it 
take at this rate of progression for the 
Japanese to outnumber the whites in Cali- 
fornia? It would be a long time, of course, 
and it would be a very considerable time, 
too, before we should have as many Japanese 
laborers in the State as we absolutely need. 



OUR BRILLIANT FOREIGN TRADE 
OUTLOOK 

As foreign trade undoubtedly is to be the 
wand that will convert San Francisco into a 
commercial emporium of world-embracing 
reach and predominate influence it is es- 
pecially interesting to observe that the 
hindrances to the full play of the forces that 
are to bring the port to the full fruition of its 
unsurpassed advantages are being removed. 
The way is clearing for the realization of the 
destiny so long awaited. 

The Government at Washington has with- 
in the past week announced the removal of 
one obstacle to our commerce. In lifting 
the embargo to trade with Russia it has 
taken a step toward the opening of a channel 
of vast possibilities. The action though 
tardy and incomplete yet gives evidence of 
the coming of free interchange of commodi- 
ties between these two greatest and most 
productive of countries. It is to be regretted 
that the exchange of mails has not yet been 
sanctioned, as until that is done business will 
be transacted with much difficulty, if at all, 
but the order signifies that we are being 
brought to a course which England has 
already adopted. The top bar has been 
lowered, and the others are likely soon to be 
dropped. 

Unimpeded trade with Russia will give this 
port a strong stimulant. We are likely to 
develop a heavy commerce with that country 
notwithstanding the time and opportunity 
lost by failure to sooner realize, as our 
competitors have done, that resumption of 
trade was important and inevitable. 

Another event of late occurrence that will 
tend to enliven business here is the change 
that has taken place within the past few 
months in conditions in Mexico. Beyond 
our southern boundary is a country of prac- 
tically inexhaustible resources. It has been 
pattially unavailable for trade purposes, but 
now is nearing a state of order and com- 



posure that will permit full and safe ex- 
change of articles of commerce. The Gov- 
ernment of Adolfo de la Huerta is doing 
everything in its power to expedite and en- 
courage trade with the United States. The 
July issue of the Journal of the American 
Chamber of Commerce at Mexico City is at 
hand with the announcement of the fact that 
a decree has been issued fixing the export 
duties on silver on a sliding scale to corre- 
spond with the changing value of metals. At 
a moment when the whole world is looking 
to Mexico for silver supply this action tend- 
ing to greatly facilitate exportation and to 
aid mining is most opportune, and shows the 
alacrity of the provisional Government in 
adopting an encouraging and helpful policy. 
And it is an understood thing that the policies 
of this Government ad interim are the index 
to the course to be pursued after the election 
of a permanent president, the incumbent of 
the presidential office having been chosen at 
the instigation of General Obregon, who, in 
all human probability, will be elected in the 
autumn. 



the world is fully keeping pace with the ad- 
vance of that of Australia and the Orient. 
The expansion of American banking facili- 
ties in South America also having a most 
beneficial effect upon our trade relations. 

San Franciscans are evincing appreciation 
of the opportunity at present beckoning them 
to increased effort to make use of its ad- 
vantages. Our harbor is in fair readiness 
to accommodate the shipping of the world. 
Monthly export figures show steady growth, 
and within the present year there is likely 
to be such activity at this port as it never 
before has known. 



Opera Bouffe has passed mortal ken, and 
comic opera has deteriorated to the point of 
rivaling tragedy in general unpopularity. 
But what is the use of becoming down- 
hearted about all that when the meeting of 
"The Allies" at Spa has been arranged for 
the entertainment of humans of all colors 
and creeds? One of the late numbers on 
the program of the Spa statesmen is the 
issuance of a proposal to the Russian Soviet 
government (which it concurrently is de- 
claring exists only commercially and not at 
all politically) asking it for an armistice with 
Poland on condition that the Poles retire 
within their natural Polish frontiers — (which 
is exactly what the aforesaid non-existent 
Soviet government has been insisting upon at 
the top of its rather hampered lungs for some 
time.) 



Already the Mexican government has re- 
stored the National Railways to their owners, 
and has promised to pay its debts to them. 
I Ins is having the effect of relieving the 
transportation situation, which had become 
clogged and ineffectual, and altogether the 
outlook in Mexico is brightening with the 
passing of weeks. This the Chamber of 
Commerce of Mexico City, a body which 
though it includes in its membership many 
prominent Mexican houses, is largely com- 
posed of alert and sturdy Americans on both 
sides of the border, is felicitating the business 
world upon, as it believes that at last the day 
is at hand when trade may assume an unin- 
terrupted course. 

Looking toward South America the com- 
mercial skies also are bright. Scarcity of 
ships no longer troubles exporters and im- 
porters and foreign trade with that quarter of 



Is this Mr. Nagai who was formerly the 
able and very popular representative of Im- 
perial Japan in San Francisco? The excit- 
ing stories of political ferment in Tokio of 
late rather center about Representative 
Nagai, whose initials are not given but whose 
general description answers that of our Mr. 
Nagai — whose progressive ideas were said to 
have led to his retirement from the diplo- 
matic service of his country. At last accounts 
two factions in the Japanese parliament 
were raging violently about Mr. Nagai, the 
one calling for his arrest for attacks upon 
the present cabinet, and the other denounc- 
ing the tyranny of the Seiyukai, or party in 
power. 



The price of missionaries is going up — 
like everything else. Time was when enter- 
prising groups of cannibals could cheerfully 
eat an evangelical brother of almost any 
denomination without a thought of interna- 
tional complications. But here we are with 
the United States Government haughtily de- 
clining to accept an unofficial $45,000 
offered as an apology for the killing of Rev. 
W. A. Reimcrt. of the Yochow Reformed 
Church. Two Chinese generals have thought- 
lessly told the truth on the witness stand 
about the killing being done by government 
troops, so the Chinese government will have 
to perform any expensive and humiliating 
stunts in the matter which the American lega- 
tion may be pleased to demand. 



Following is a small gem from what the 
editor of the "Annals of 12 L" (Federal 
Reserve) describes as an attack of versifica- 
tion symptomatic of "flu." The effusion 
shows that the author's heart is in the right 
place, whatever may be thought of his hcad- 
and— feet : 

WHEN YOU KNOW HIM 

\\ ben you get lo know a fellow, know his every 

mood and whim. 
You begin lo find the texture of the splendid side 

of him. 
You begin to understand him. and you cease to scoff 

and sneer. 

th understanding always prejudices disappear. 
You begin to find his virtues, and his faults you 

cease to tell. 
For you seldom hale a fellow when you know him 

very well. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 17, 1920 



Town Crier 



Hear the Crier: Who the Devil Art Thou? One Thai Will Play the Devil, Sir. With Yoa. 



The recent grand jury "investigation" of 
the practice of shyster lawyers in the courts 
of San Francisco suggests the wisdom of 
placing upon the statutes of the State a law 
protecting the public from their depredations. 
These vultures scent a possible case for 
blackmail operations as far as the scavengers 
of the Andes note the decaying carcass of a 
bullock on the steppes of South America. 
Having no consciences, they are ready to 
enter into any questionable transaction which 
promises a return in coin. They are the 
bushwhackers of the race — a disgrace to 
their profession. The shyster of the pro- 
fession is the result of native depravity 
coupled with the temptation to do wrong, 
and an apparent absence of determined 
resistence on the part of their victims. 

An uncaged lawyer may here play such 
rank tricks before courts, in bank, in cham- 
bers, with juries and elsewhere as to cause 
angels to weep, and get no further punish- 
ment than an occasional sharp word of re- 
proof or a fine, laid today and remitted to- 
morrow. Occasionally his sharp practices 
become so monstrous that he is threatened 
with the bar association. This is a painted 
devil which excites his boisterous mirth, for 
the bar association here is a most solemn, 
sedate and ponderous fizzle. Thus the very 
influences which should check the vicious 
intent of these industrious scavengers is 
loaned to their encouragement. Anything 
short of murder is dismissed with a shrug of 
the shoulders or an elevation of the eye- 
lash. 

•v- ¥ « 

A contemporary informs us that every 
once in a while some business man breaks 
down under the terrific brain strain con- 
nected with his business. If this astonish- 
ing sentiment survives I crave leave to dis- 
turb it with a breath of dissent. Brain work 
never broke down any man. The more one 
works one's brain the more readily it re- 
sponds to additional demands. It is not 
brain work that wears a man out, but worry. 
Successful men of large affairs are bigger 
than their business. They do not worry. 
They control their affairs instead of being 
swayed by them. It is only the little fellow 
that permits himself to be scared stiff by the 
apparent magnitude of his own undertakings. 
They follow him home, sleep with him, eat 
with him, make his life miserable and in- 
efficient and finally deliver him a victim to 
"brain-fag." 

* * * 

One of these fine mornings we shall miss 
"Prosperity" at breakfast. There will be 



many excuses for her absence. One will say 
overproduction, another will say abnormal 
extension of credits, another will say the high 
cost of living. But none of thes* will be 
the real reason, though they may be con- 
tributary. The real reason will be an epi- 
demic of fear, timidity, distrust, produced by 
unwarranted, continuous attacks upon every 
instrument of progress and development that 
has made and is making this country great. 
Had there been less prosperity, had there 
been less cushion for the impact, financial 
and industrial depression would already have 
overtaken us. No commerce can keep its 
courage in the face of the demogoguery of 
politicians, yellow journals and the envious. 
There is a grain of comfort in the reflection 
that when the reaction does take place the 
supporters of these straw reforms will be so 
profoundly engaged in an endeavor to avoid 
starvation that their capacity for mischief 

will be considerably curtailed. 
¥ # * 

One of our lawmakers who should know 
better, talks in a pessimistic way of condi- 
tions as now existing and sighs for a com- 
munity of interests such as made for More's 
"Utopia," in my opinion, a most abominable 
place to live in. The philosophy of Utopia, 
like that of Plato's Commonwealth, shows 
keen insight into human nature and enter- 
tainingly sets forth imaginary customs and 
people as theoretically false as they are im- 
practicable. We may be inclined toward 
tolerance of these flagrant inconsistencies 
because of a sense of justice and humanity 
pervading them, but a hope that so imperfect 
an Utopia as More's should come to be, 
is quite beyond (he conception of most 
present-day individuals. Selfishness is the 
root of everything. The idea is erroneous 
that uniformity in dress, similarity in dwell- 
ings and common knowledge of occupations 
will uniformly unlift the mass or tend to 
lessen individual advancement. As well ex- 
pect cabbage, because planted in the front 
yard, to bring forth tea-roses as to expect 
man to rise above his inherent instincts, no 

matter what his environment.. 
•v- v- ¥• 

We must elevate human nature from with- 
in before we can expect to elevate society. 
We cannot expect to legislate virtue into a 



man. It is preposterous to maintain that a 
people can arrive at a state of social per- 
fection through the means of laws framed 
by rulers of their own selection. Such con- 
ditions could not exist only under an abso- 
lute monarchy. To have More's Utopia we 
must have machine-made people, all of one 
pattern, with the same ambitions, aspirations, 
tastes and temperament. If one shall, in the 
fraction of a fig-tree, show more in his 
garden than his neighbor, there is born 
rivalry and caste beneath the Utopian sun, 
and that desire for betterment, innate in all 
that reason, will carry into other things, up 
and out of Arcadian simplicity, to the en- 
largement and advancement of mankind. 

I regret to observe that Mr. Erich Buehle 
is but feebly addicted to gallantry. He has 
just enough of it to politely inform Princess 
Delia Pattra that he desires the return of 
some forty-odd thousand dollars that he paid 
for her affections and which it is claimed she 
failed to deliver in merchantable condition 
according to specifications. And even this 
evidence of gentlemanly consideration for the 
tender emotions of the weaker sex is wiped 
out by his subsequent action. He now at- 
tempts to pry the aforesaid forty thousand 
from Delia's pocket, or stocking, or where- 
ever it is that she keeps these trifling sums, 
by the rude aid of detectives, lawyers and 
courts. In this he exhibits as woeful an 
ignorance of woman as he did of gallantry. 
How much, pray, does he think is left of the 
forty thousand after a six months' absence of 
his lady love, all by her lonely, in New York? 
After this Mr. B. may justly boast himself 
accessable to any folly that comes his way. 

"All niggers look alike to me," or words 
of like purport, is the reply of United States 
District Attorney J. Robert O'Connor to Mr. 
Jack Johnson's offer to surrender himself to 
United States officials, provided he should be 
"at no time handcuffed or treated as a 
prisoner." If this ex-prize fighter were 
capable of comprehending how fervently the 
people of this country don't want him, in jail 
or out, he would not ask for privileges as 
a condition of his return. An ample 
sufficiency of his breed and profession are 
already supplying the courts with practice 
and expense. 



"The Germans fear another in- 
vasion," declare the allies' newspapers. We 
don't see how the Deutchers can fear any- 
thing more — even a coroner's inquest. 



CLINTON CAFETERIA 



136 O'FARRELL STREET 
Opposite Orpheum Theater 



Continuous Serving from 7 A. M. to 8 P. M. — Music. Lunch and Dinner Orchestral and Vocal 



July 17, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



The Man From Mars 



By Stanton A. Coblentz. 

EVERY day I am growing more and more 
puzzled. I have now been in San Fran- 
cisco more than a week, and as yet I 
cannot understand this city in the least. 

Yesterday I had a remarkable experience. 
I was sitting in a restaurant with my friend 
Bragg, when he invited me to have a glass 
of wine. Naturally, I accepted, but to my 
surprise the glass of wine was brought in 
a cup. "What's the reason?" I inquired, but 
Bragg warned me to be silent, for a police- 
man was just then coming down the aisle. 
The officer stood genially conversing for a 
while with the proprietor, then he, too, drank 
something from a cup, smacked his lips, and 
went out. 

Bragg explained to me that it was against 
the law to be caught drinking. This made it 
evident to me that the percentage of drunk- 
ards on the earth must have been very high, 
and, as I was in a boastful mood, I remarked 
that the earth contrasted very unfavorably 
with Mars. "On my planet," I said, "we 
have never had prohibition, and have not 
suffered seriously in consequence. The per- 
centage of the population that is habitually 
drunk is not very high — not usually very 
much in excess of 50 per cent. Of course, 
there has been some slight agitation by the 
cranks, but you will understand that this is 
very silly, since not more than 62% per cent 
of our people have ever been drunk at any 
one time. At least, if the percentage went 
higher than that, there were not enough 
sober people to take the statistics. Fanatical 
reformers have argued that we should have 
prohibition merely because half the people 
were lying around drunk most of the time, 
and the other half were so busy caring for 
the intoxicated that they did not have time 
to look after their business. It's absurd to 
have prohibition on such grounds, do you not 
think so. Bragg?" 

Bragg acknowledged that it was absurd. 

"Then," I continued, triumphantly, "why 
not postpone prohibition in the earth until 
75 or 80 per cent of the people are habitual 
drunkards?" 

Bragg declared that that would be a good 
idea. 

"Up on Mus." I stated, "we are belie\eis 
in personal liberty, and maintain that nothing 
can be important enough to interfere with 
individual freedom. The insane reformers I 
have already told you of contend that our 
freedom to consume whiskey should be cur- 
tailed merely because whiskey has increased 
crime 814 per cent — but no one with an 
atom ot sense would listen to such an argu- 



ment! We have solved the problem by 
putting the reformers in jail. Unless liquor 
has increased crime on the earth by at least 
2000 per cent, it is preposterous to urge pro- 
hibition on that ground." 

"Outrageous!" agreed Bragg. 

"Now I will show you further how prohi- 
bition is working," said Bragg, a moment 
later. And he led me to the thirteenth floor 
of an office building, and stopped before a 
door marked "Real Estate." He rapped in 
a peculiar way, as if seeking admittance to 
a lodge room, and the door opened, to dis- 
play the most peculiar real estate equipment 
I had ever seen. 

After we had had our drinks (for which 
we paid sixty-five cents apiece) Bragg re- 
marked that luckily, owing to competition 
among the dealers, the price had come down 
from a dollar a drink, and that the trade was 
hoping it would be reduced still further. 

"And now do you see what a failure pro- 
hibition is?" asked Bragg. "The former 
saloon keepers are getting rich from their 
illicit traffic, the public is being deprived r 
its revenue, and the only man excluded from 
drinking is the one who can't afford it. oi 
who doesn't know where to get a drink." 

This impressed me as a very reasonable 
argument. 

"It's clear that prohibition has done no 
good," I said. "Undoubtedly, as much 
liquor is consumed as ever." 



"Well, I can't say that," replied my friend. 
"But as much damage is done." 

"And as time goes on, there is, of course, 
no chance of the damage growing less. 
Although the old liquor is being exhausted, 
and it is becoming increasingly difficult to 
manufacture a new supply, the consumption 
will always remain the same as at present. 
That is self-evident." 

"As long as people want liquor badly 
enough, they will get it!" replied Bragg. 
"And not all the laws in the world can stop 
them!" 

"Again you are right!" said I. "And of 
course, there will never come a time when 
fewer people than at present will crave for 
alcohol. The rising generation will un- 
doubtedly be one of hard drinkers, perhaps 
because of the difficulty and expense of pro- 
curing liquor. And since as many as ever 
will desire alcohol, we are to expect that as 
many will obtain it. It's all perfectly 
simple." 

Bragg slapped me on the back, appreci- 
atively. "It's remarkable how quickly you 
understand," he commented. "Some misin- 
formed persons, such as the writer Jack 
London, who in other respects is worth read- 
ing, have declared the curse of liquor to be 
its constant availability. But that is quite 
ridiculous, as you can see from your own 
experience." 

The cogency of Bragg's reasoning never 
failed to surprise me. "Ludicrous!" I agreed. 
"We on Mars, with but little more than 50 
per cent of drunkards, would not regard the 

(Continued on Page Eleven) 



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Distributors and service for Exide batteries. Phone San Mateo 33. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 17, 1920 



The Humbled Mighty 



Switzerland is generally known as a re- 
public, yet at the present time four kings 
are living there. Of course, they do not 
enjoy the power that kings sometimes pos- 
sess, for they are in exile; but they may 
live in any part of the country, with the 
understanding that if they attempt to take 
part in any political agitation, they will be 
forcibly apprised that their presence in the 
country is no longer desired. 

Former Emperor Charles of Austria is 
living in a picturesque chateau at Prangins 
on Lake Geneva, three miles from Nyons in 
the Canton of Vaud. It is situated in a most 
secluded spot in a small wood lying back 
from the main road between Lausanne and 
Geneva, and dates from the early part of the 
eighteenth century, and after the battle of 
Waterloo it was the residence for a time of 
Joseph Bonaparte, a brother of the great 
Napoleon. 

Constance, the former King of Greece, 
appears to enjoy his enforced residence in 
Switzerland, and passes his time either in 
automobiling. fishing and boating on the 
lakes, or mountain climbing. He made his 
headquarters during the winter at Lucerne 
in a charming villa overlooking the lake, and 
went in the spring to Lugano. 

Very little is heard of the third exile mon- 
arch living in Switzerland, the former ruler 
of Bavaria, who spends the greater part of 
his time in a modest villa, situated in a quiet 
nook at Locarno, which would be very diffi- 
cult for a stranger to find, as the residence 
there is known only to one or two of the 
local authorities. The ex-king takes long 
walks through the woods or by the side of 
the lake and devotes a great deal of his time 
to reading his books which have been sent to 
him from Munich. 

Several members of the Russian nobility 
who still have some money left are living in 
a little colony at Villeneuve near Montreau. 
The condition of the other Russian refugees 
in this country is described by officials of the 
Swiss government as deplorable in the ex- 
treme. The majority of them belong to the 
finest families in Russia, who have never 
done any kind of work in their lives and are 
loo old and broken down to do anything now. 
Each of the big hotels in Switzerland is shel- 
tering four or five of these helpless and 
penniless people, who once had their great 
mansions and estates with retinues of liveried 
servants at their command and were sur- 
rounded with every luxury. 

European royalty has never fallen on more 
evil days than these. Not only have mon- 
archs lost their thrones, but royal princes 



have been compelled to camouflage their 
titles, and distract public attention from their 
pedigrees. 

The former Duke Alexander of Teck has 
changed his title to Earl of Athlone, hoping 
to dodge the storm. He is a brother-in-law 
of King George of England, and an aspirant 
to the governorship of Canada. The Cana- 
dians are, however, not as anxious for royal 
princes at the head of their government as 
they were. Prince Arthur of Connaught, first 
cousin of King George, is slated for the 
governorship of South Africa. That gets one 
of the rivals of the Earl of Athlone out of 
the way and may help him to the salary of 
Canada's best position. 

The League of Nations, if functioning 
energetically, might relieve some of the wor- 
ried royalties, but otherwise their future is 
dark with clouds. 



PROPAGANDA TRAINS 

Some of the devices employed by the Rus- 
sian Bolsheviks for spreading their principles 
are such as to be of equal interest to Bol- 
sheviks and non-Bolsheviks alike. One of 
the most striking is the propaganda train, 
which is interestingly described by a corre- 
spondent to the Manchester Guardian. 

Russia, for purposes of internal propa- 
ganda, is divided into five sections, and each 
section has its own train, prepared for the 
particular political needs of the section it 
serves, bearing its own name, carrying its 
regular crew, a propaganda unit, as cor- 
porate as the crew of a ship. The five trains 
at present in existence are the Lenin, the 
Sverdlov, the October Revolution, the Red 
East (which is now in Turkestan), and the 
Red Cossack. 

So far the main use of these trains, as 
of the posters which they distribute, has 
been propaganda for the Soviets against 
Russian Whites and their foreign supporters. 



Housewife— 
you find it ? 
love is blind. 



If you love work, why don't 
Tramp (sadly) — Alas, lady. 



After the next election the Hon. 

Woodrow Wilson will be a bigger man than 
the next president of the United States, or 
smaller than Brother Tumulty — or Colonel 
Woodshed of Texas. 



Chauffeur — Cup of coffee, doughnuts, and 
some griddle cakes. Waitress — Cylinder oil, 
couple o' non-skids, and an order of blow- 
out patches. 



Mary — They say that very wise people are 
awfully homely. Marty (very ardently) — 
Mary, you're the most beautiful girl in th'. 
world. 



NEW LOCATION 

Of the Old-Established Firm of 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Cosgrove announce the 
opening of their new hair store, beautifully 
fitted and equipped with every modern 
convenience and facility for perfect service, at 

360 Geary Street 

Next to St. Francis Hotel 



Fig Packing Demonstration 

Mrs. Fred Hansen has installed a miniature packing plant in our s&rrc, where she is demonstrating to 
(he public the modern methods and sanitary conditions under which 

SIERRA BRAND FIGS AND RAISINS Are Packed 

This special event should not be overlooked by anyone. 

Special prices on all of Mrs. Hansen's packs during this demonstration. 

Now at GOLDBERG, BOWEN & COMPANY, Grocers, 242 Sutter St 



July 17, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



SOLVING HOUSING PROBLEMS 

In view of the scarcity of housing facilities 
in San Francisco, as in most other places at 
present, it is interesting to see how the 
English town of Halifax has solved the 
problem. 

Until quite recently Halifax had made no 
real progress toward the provision of the 
I3C0 dwellings which it needs for the hous- 
ing of its overflow population. The first ten- 
tative little scheme, for thirty-six houses to 
be erected by labor employed direct by the 
Corporation, was starved for want of work- 
men, and remained for many mouths little 
more than a paper scheme. 

When it came to engaging the workmen, 
the Corporation found that the private 
builders were offering certain inducements to 
the men not to leave their present employ- 
ment, and that they were determined to 
release no labor for the purpose of helping 
on the housing scheme unless the conduct of 
the scheme was given into their keeping, 
with no interference whatever from the local 
authority. Feeling that the town was, in a 
manner, being held to ransom, the Housing 
Committee agreed to receive a deputation 
from the local Building Guild, which offered 
to build the thirty-six houses on condition 
that it was allowed to tender for the next 
batch of houses which are to be erected. 
Their conditions were accepted. 

That was more than a month ago, and 
already a number of dwellings are nearing 
completion. Several houses should be ready 
for occupation within four or five weeks. 
The Guild has — under the oversight of a 
clerk of works — the management of the 
scheme, and so far the Housing Committee is 
delighted with the manner in which the 
Guildsmen have applied themselves to their 
tasks. Even those who were not at first 
favorable to the guild idea, and were pro- 
foundly skeptical as to its practicability, are 
said to be impressed by the fine spirit with 
which the men are entering into their work. 



EXODUS OF TOURISTS 

The rush of American tourists to Europe 
has not been abated by the raising of the 
passport fee from $2 to $10. Neither have 
tourists been deterred by the increase of 
steamship rates. 

On the Atlantic liners rates have been ad- 
vanced as agreed upon at a meeting of the 
North Atlantic Passenger Conference, and 
now in effect on the American Line. Red 
Star Line. White Star Line. Cunard Line. 
Holland-America Line and French Line. 

The minimum first class rates for July 
are: 

White Star Line— Olympic. $245: Adri- 
atic. $225: Baltic. $210; Cedric. $210: 
Celtic. $210. 



Amer-ican Line— St. Paul, $135; Phila- 
delphia, $135; Kroonland, $195; Finland, 
$195; Zeeland, $195; Lapland, $205. 

Cunard Line — Aquitania, $240; Maure- 
tania, $238; Kaiserin Auguste Victoria, 
$227.50; Imperator, to French ports, $249, 
to British ports, $234; Columbia, $180; 
Vasari. $196.50. 

French Line — La France, $245; Lafay- 
ette, $185; La Lorraine, $180; La Savoie, 

$180. 

These are minimum rates for first cabin 
accommodations, the majority of cabins 
bringing higher prices in accordance with 
their superior comforts. A high toll is ex- 
acted for those desiring to travel in the best 
accommodations of the de luxe steamships. 
On La France a cabin de luxe with private 
bath is $60 for one person and $800 for 
two. The company charges $2800 for a 
palatial suite of two bedrooms, a dining 
room, drawing room and private bath. 

Though last summer's rush to Europe was 
tremendously greater than the normal rush 
of pre-war years, the demands for passage 
this summer have far exceeded the highest 
previous figures. All liners are booked to 
capacity. 

The desire to see the battlefields of 
Europe is one of the reasons for the exodus 
of prospercus Americans. Prohibition is 
another reason. Many San Francisco people 
this year, instead of taking California trips, 
went to Canada, and some of them are re- 
turning not well pleased. They found it diffi- 
cult and expensive to obtain beverages and 
the hotel rates were out of reason. 



A FOREIGN VIEW OF AMERICA 

Yves Buhler. a French youth who gradu- 
ated from Harvard College in June, makes 
some rather unflattering comments on New- 
York and the United States in his article, "A 
Frenchman's First Impressions of America." 
which appears in the current issue of the 
1 l.irvard Advocate. 

"New York! Is this the twentieth century 
marvel so often seen in pictures?" he asks. 
"I gaze through the window in a hopeless 
search for beauty as the taxi dodges prssers- 
by in a mad chase after an unknown hotel. 
No wonder newspaper boys here have be- 
come millionaires! Why. the fare that word- 
splitting driver asks would hardly appear on 
the meter of the most unscrupulous Parisian 
chauffeur drmng a foreign lamb with a 
Follics-Bergeres she-wolf through the Bois 
de Boulogne. 

"Fifth Avenue. Funny dresses the 
women wear. They have no shape, to say 
nothing of the shades — a regular masquerade 
attire. This one is too terrible! Let us look 
at the buildings. No particular architectural 
beauty, but what astonishing height. Ouch! 
My neck! Now I know why men wear soft 



collars. I can't look up any longer. Con- 
found it! Who pushed me off the sidewalk? 
That young girl! Dear me! She must be 
in an awful hurry. Time is money, I see. 
Americans put their dicta into practice. 



DANCING AT MARQUARD'S 

The Saturday afternoons at Marquard's 
are a great treat for those who delight in 
dancing, and their name is legion. Dancing 
never grows stale, for it is the best expression 
of youth, and nowhere better expressed than 
at Marquard's. 

In the delightful program there is the regu- 
lar dansant from 2:30 to 5:30 and dancing 
at the dinner de luxe, from 6 to 9. Taalam 
Harvey presents a Hula Hula which is a 
veritable thriller, and Harry Dudley's beau- 
tiful show girls appear in eight novelty acts 
including the Hawaiian number. 

Marquard's is the legitimate successor of 
Fred Solari, at the same location — Geary 
and Mason. 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 

PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 
Offices— 505-507— 323 Geary Street 

Phone Douglas 2433 



DR. WM. W. HOAGLAND 

DENTIST 
PSBVKOT BBaVlCJ INSIRES SATISFACTION 

Offices, 908 Market St , Third Floor 
TELEPHONE GARFIELD 836 



Fire, Earthquake. Automobile, Use and Occupancy, 

Riot and Civil Commotion, Explosion, 'Plate Class, 

Fidelity and Surety $ond 

INSURANCE 



LONDON & LANCASHIRE FIRE 
INSURANCE CO., Ltd. 

OKLIV! I. AM' Inr,.rr<.ratedlKl 

ORIENT INSURANCE CO. of Hartford, 
Conn. 

LAW UNION & ROCK Insurance Co., 
Lid. 

Of L- 



LONDON & LANCASHIRE INDEMNITY 
COMPANY of America 

H York 
' 'aTiunry, 1915 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT: 332 Pine 
Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

SA\f B. STOY. Manager 

Geo. Ormood Smith, Agency Superintendent. 

San Francisco 

J. P. Yates. Agency Superintendent, 

Los Angeles 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 17. 1920 



Educational Efficiency 



THERE is something insignificant and 
stimulating to thought in a recent re- 
port regarding the New York schools 
made by Dr. Leonard P. Ayres, director of 
the department of education of the Russell 
Sage Foundation. It is the contention of 
Dr. Ayres that the New York schools have 
moved back from second to thirteenth place 
and the California schools advanced to 
second, Montana being first. The methods 
that Dr. Ayres employed in reaching this con- 
clusion strike to the root of the question of 
the purpose and the success of all education. 
The questions that Dr. Ayres asked in 
examining the schools of a State were: 

"What per cent of the children of 
school age, from 5 to 18 years of age, 
were attending school daily? 

"How many days during the year on 
the average did each child of school age 
attend school? 

"What was the average number of 
days the schools were kept open? 

"What portion of all children in at- 
tendance were in high school? 

"What per cent of all children in 
high school were boys and what per 
cent girls? 

"What was the average annual ex- 
penditure per child attending school? 

"What was the average annual ex- 
penditure per child of school age? 

"What was the average annual ex- 
penditure per teacher employed? 

"What was the expenditure per pupil 
for purposes other than teachers' 
salaries? 

"What was the average expenditure 
per teacher for salaries?" 
Perhaps to answer such questions is to 
determine the educational success of any 
community, but the questionnaire gives the 
impression of placing emphasis upon the 
quantity of education rather than upon its 
quality. In some respects, no one is likely 
to disagree with Mr. Ayres. There can be 
no doubt that a community in which 90 per 
cent of those of school age are in attendance 
is more successful educationally, than one in 
which 9 per cent are in attendance; but 
would one argue that of two communities, 
equal in percentage of attendance and in 
other statistical respects, neither is likely to 
be superior. Would there not be some 
deeper element ultimately more influential 
than anything that statistics could reveal? 
The creation of a proper school atmosphere, 
the teaching of the subjects best adapted to 
the needs of the students, the instilling of a 
proper sympathy between instructors and 



student, the engaging of competent teachers, 
are questions of far more consequence than 
most of those into which Mr. Ayres inquires 
statistically. 

Yet only one of these questions — the 
engaging of more competent teachers — re- 
ceives Mr. Ayres' attention at all. And that 
question he also deals with statistically, and 
does not even consider all its statistical as- 
pects. The salaries of teachers seem to him 
to constitute the only criterion of the 
teachers' worth. There can be no doubt that 
there is much truth behind his point of view, 
that the salaries of teachers have in a gen- 
eral way a great deal to do with the quality 
of teachers, and that many persons of ability 
have been induced to leave the teaching field 
because of the superior opportunities offered 
in business and other spheres. But there are 
other factors quite as important as teachers' 
salaries. 

For one thing, before we can be sure of 
competent teachers, the appointment of the 
teacher must be made independent of poli- 
tics, whi»h at present is not generally done. 
Many persons who either are incompetent 
by nature, or have grown so through age, are 
allowed to clog the school systems, and to 
deny the children that education to which 
they are entitled, and for which their parents 
are taxed. The writer can recall a deaf 
woman who was allowed to try to teach 
school because her sister was principal. 
Other incompetents are suffered to continue 
in their positions because they are in need. 
In such cases they should be pensioned, or 
cared for by charitable institutions, but the 
children should not be made to pay the 
penalty. 

The most important thing is that the 
teacher's training be thorough and adequate, 
and that no incompetents be granted the 
teacher's license. In most States, steps have 
already been taken in that direction, and 
teaching is coming to be regarded as a pro- 
fession requiring technical training in the 
same way as medicine and the law. If 
teachers are required to spend a longer time 
in training, they will naturally have to be 
paid higher salaries, though the ultimate test 
of education is neither the salary nor training 
of the teacher, or the attendance or age of 
the student, but rests upon the intangible and 
unmeasurable effects upon the mind and 
character of the student, and upon the 
tangible and measurable results in the 
student's subsequent accomplishments. 



CONTINUED USE OF INTOXICANTS 

In spite of the fact that the day of prohi- 
bition has arrived, the day of intoxicants 
does not seem to have vanished. This fact 
is indicated by recent statistics. More than 
57,000 druggists, retail and wholesale, and 
manufacturers of proprietary medicines, 
flavoring extracts, syrups, etc., have been 
licensed in the United States and its consular 
possessions to date, under the National Pro- 
hibition act, according to statistics just 
compiled in the office of the prohibition com- 
missioner, John H. Kramer. 

The records of the Internal Revenue Bu- 
reau also show that nearly 16,000 physicians 
in the United States, Hawaii and Porto Rico 
have received permits to write prescriptions 
calling for the dispensation of intoxicating 
liquors for medicinal purposes and that addi- 
tional permits at the rate of 1000 a month 
are being issued to physicians. 

The exact figures are: Massachusetts, 
2450; New York, 2421; Pennsylvania, 
1525; Ohio. 1450; Maryland. 1225; Mis- 
souri. I 150; Minnesota, 693. In States such 
as Illinois, Kansas and Indiana, where State 
codes will not permit of the use of such per- 
mits, no physicians have been licensed by the 
Government so to prescribe. 

Porto Rican physicians, apparently, are 
awake to their opportunities under prohibi- 
tion, 176 licenses to physicians to prescribe 
intoxicating liquors having been issued in 
that Territory, or more than have been issued 
in Mississippi, Arkansas, New Mexico. Ne- 
vada. North Dakota. South Dakota. West 
Virginia, Georgia, Florida and Maine com- 
bined. 



THE PALACE HOTEL 



S 



for 

ervice 

atisfaction 

miles 



A WONDERFULLY EFFECTIVE 
COMBINATION 

Management of 
HALSEY E. MANWARING 



The Cow — What do you think of this day- 
light saving? The Rooster — Easy enough. I 
just turned my crow forward an hour. 



FRENCH-AMERICAN BANK OF SAVINGS 
(Savings Department) 108 Suiter si. — For the 
half year ending June 30, 1920, a dividend has 
been declared at the rale of four (4) per cent 
per annum on all deposits, payable on and after 
July I. 1920. Dividends not called for are added 
to and bear ihc same rate of interest as the 
principal from July I, 1920. Deposits made on 
or before July 10. 1920, will earn interest from 
July I, 1920. 

LEON BOCQUERAZ. President. 



July 17, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



II 



Unpunished Deaths 



TWENTY-FIVE HUNDRED persons have 
been killed in New York City alone from 
motor accidents during the past five 
years, according to statistics recently com- 
piled. In other words, as many New Yorkers 
have been avoidably slain through the reck- 
lessness or incompetence of automobile 
drivers as lost their lives in the World War. 

In this respect, New York City is by no . 
means unique. It differs from other localities 
only in that the statistics have been com- 
piled more accurately, and there can be no 
doubt that in San Francisco the percentage 
of automobile fatalities is no less high. There 
can be no doubt, furthermore, that the loss 
of life is on the increase rather than on the 
decrease; that as the number of motor 
vehicles grows, and their use becomes more 
widespread, the wastage of human life is 
daily becoming greater. 

There are several reasons for the loss of 
life in automobile disasters, and several 
classes of persons mainly responsible. Per- 
haps the most dangerous driver of all is the 
young girl, who is often a novice, who i? 
frequently careless, and quite as frequently 
of a nervous disposition that makes her a 
menace as a driver. No less dangerous is the 
drunken driver, who is more generally recog- 
nized as a menace, but who has yet to b< 
eliminated. Hardly less of a peril to thr 
pedestrian public is the sporty young man. 
who does not care what chances he take? 
with the lives of others. The delivery wagon 
man is another; one frequently sees him 
especially when he is homeward bound, 
wheeling around the corner at a tremendous 
speed, and if one would retain his life, that is 
his own lookout. The road hog is another 
enemy of safety, and the work of destruction 
is completed by fools of various types, note- 
worthy among which is the prosperous busi- 
nessman, who drives to and from his wo ' 
with a speed that might indicate that a 
moment of his time was a matter of far more 
consequence than the safety of pedestrians. 

Yet while accidents occur almost daily, 
there is one person who is most exposed to 
danger and yet seems to bear a charmed life. 
That is the traffic policeman. He stands for 
hours where traffic is thickest: each moment 
automobiles pass him by the dozen, yet 
rarely if ever is he struck by one. What is 
the reason for his immunity? Is it that 
Providence makes him a special favorite, 
and covers him with a magic coat of mail 
that protects him from the attacks of the 
motorists? Or is it that the automobile 
drivers, realizing that a special penalty would 
be attached to striking the traffic police- 
man, take special care to avoid hitting 
him? 

Unless one believes the traffic policeman 
to be under the special protection of Heaxen. 



he must answer this question in the affirma- 
tive. And this leads us to the proposition 
that the lives of pedestrians seem to be re- 
garded as matters of secondary consideration, 
and that the pedestrian has rights only when 
they do not interfere with those of motor 
vehicles. Obviously, some remedy is 
necessary. 

At present practically any person, compe- 
tent or incompetent, is allowed to drive an 
automobile. Many more accidents might be 
averted if the penalties for manslaughter 
were increased, and if it were not made so 
hard to prove manslaughter that most of the 
guilty ones escape unscathed. The fact that 
a driver had run down a man should be con- 
sidered evidence of his guilt, and the penalty 
should be not a fine, but a jail sentence. 

At first sight this may seem an extreme 
point of view, but in reality it is very moder- 
ate. Thousands of lives are being lost each 
year through motor accidents. That many 
of these accidents are avoidable, is proved 
by the fact, already pointed out, that the 
person with authority seems to bear a 
charmed life, while he who is not fortun- 
ate enough to be a traffic policeman is in 
peril of his life. A man who takes the life 
of one of his fellows, deliberately, is hanged 
or put in prison for life, and so it would not 
be unjust to imprison for a year, at least, 
the man who takes the life of one of his 
fellows through carelessness. And certainly, 
such a penalty would result in the saving of 
thousands of lives. 

The chief trouble seems to be that the 
man in a motor car regards himself as a sort 
of superior being, with superior rights. He 
has all the pride of caste, and regards with 
what may seem to him to be justified arro- 
gance, the man who interferes with the 
speed of his motor car. If a pedestrian is in 
his way. the driver rarely seems to think of 
stopping. He may blow his horn repeatedly, 
to command the humble citizen on foot, to 
get out of his way. but even when he has 
run down the victim, he may turn on the gas 
and sprint out of sight. The pedestrian is 
usually a harmless. unobtrusi\e individual 
bent only on carrying out his own business, 
and on avoiding the motorists, but he may be 
deaf or lame, or for some other reason 
unable to avoid his more fortunate fellow in 
the limousine — and if so. there may be 
business for the undertaker. Perhaps the 
only safe system would be for pedestrians to 
go equipped with horns, which they must 
blow repeatedly to warn automobilists that 
they are coming. 



( Continued from Page Seven) 
availability of liquor as a menace. How 
absurd to think that the number of drinkers 
could be reduced if a man had to pay, let us 
say, a hundred dollars for a drink, or to go 
a hundred miles to get it!" 

And both Bragg and I laughed heartily at 
the lunacy of such an idea. 

"V'ou can see for yourself how anxious 
people are to get liquor," Bragg continued. 
"Every day there's a new report in the 
papers of the robbery of some whiskey ware- 
house. There could be no better evidence 
that the law is being violated, and it goes 
without saying that the fact that the law is 
violated constitutes the best proof that it is 
worthless." 

"That stands to reason," said I. "Up on 
Mars we have no laws that are violated. In 
fact, we have scarcely any laws at all. At 
one time, I will admit, we did have laws that 
were disobeyed, but we have long ago re- 
pealed them. For example, we used to have 
a statute against murder, but it was revoked 
years ago, because we found that people will 
kill one another whether there is a law 
against it or not. It may be true that mur- 
ders have become somewhat more frequent 
since the law was abolished, but that is one 
of the muior evils necessarily attendant upon 
the reform. At all events, we have the satis- 
faction of knowing that, however frequent 
murder may become, we have fewer law- 
breakers than when murder was a crime." 

"I see the point," said Bragg, and I felt 
flattered to think that he admired our 
Martian wisdom. "Of course, it would be 
horrible to license murder here, or even 
manslaughter," he announced. "But it would 
be reasonable to petition Congress to abolish 
prohibition, in order to reduce the number 
of law-breakers." 



Willie — Paw, what is the difference be- 
tween an engaged girl and a married 
woman? Maw — A married woman per- 
sonally attends to the work of putting on her 
rubbers, my son. Paw — Willie, you keep 
your mouth shut. 



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ma Street. (Douglas 4316) 

FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 17. 1920 



Gossip of Society 



Mr. and Mrs. John Mighell are receiving 
the congratulations of their friends on the 
birth of a son. Mrs. Mighell was the former 
Miss Eleanor Tay, the daughter of Mrs. 
Frederick Henshaw. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Tobin, Miss Barbara 
Tobin and Master Richard Tobin have gone 
to the Parrott ranch in St. Helena, where 
Mrs. John Parrott and Miss Emily Parrott 
are established for the summer. Prior to 
their return to San Mateo Mr. and Mrs. 
Tobin and their children will visit Del Monte. 

Mrs. Alexander Rutherford, who has been 
\ isiting her mother, Mrs. Sydney Smythe in 
New York, will return West later in the 
month. 

Dr. and Mrs. Henry L. Pritchett of New 
York have come to California on a visit and 
are staying in Santa Barbara. Dr. Pritchett 
will come from the South later in the month 
to be a guest of William H. Crocker at the 
Bohemian Grove. 

Leon Brooks Walker and Howard 
Spreckels are week-end guests at the country 
place on the Russian river of Cyril McNear. 

Miss Louis Boyd, who has been visiting in 
the East for the past few weeks, will return 
to her home here this month. 

Mrs. Stetson Winslow is visiting in Santa 
Barbara. 

Dr. and Mrs. Walter Boardman are receiv- 
ing the congratulations of their friends on 
the birth of a daughter. 

Mrs. Macondray Moore and Mrs. Thomas 
Breeze have gone to Tahoe, where they will 
pass the season, returning to their homes 
in San Mateo in the fall. 

One of the principal social events of the 
week was the dinner which Mr. and Mrs. 
Paul Verdier gave at their home in Burlin- 
game, which they recently purchased from 
George T. Marye, to celebrate the Fall of 
the Bastile. 

Miss Constance Hart and Miss Lorna 
Williamson were hostesses at a very informal 
dinner party in the Rose room of the Palace 
hotel on Thursday evening, July 8, enter- 
taining several visiting naval officers. 

Mrs. James Haggin, who, with Mrs. 
Frederick Sharon, left Friday morning 
motoring south to Santa Barbara, entertained 
informally at luncheon on Wednesday in the 
Palm court of the Palace hotel. 

Mrs. James Robinson and her daughter, 
Mrs. James Goodwin, have gone to Santa 
Barbara and are at the Arlington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hobart and Miss 
Ruth Hobart left town Sunday for Tahoe, 
where they will open their summer home. In 
the fall Mr. and Mrs. Hobart will go East 
for several weeks. 



Mr. and Mrs. Norris King Davis and the 
Misses Marjorie and Nancy Davis are at 
Tahoe for the summer. Later in the season 
they will visit at Del Monte for a few days. 

A delightfully informal affair of the week- 
end was the picnic which Frederick Van 
Sicklen gave Sunday, the party motoring 
fiom here to the Spring Valley lakes, where 
a picnic luncheon was served at one of the 
summer homes. Those sharing the pleasure 
of the outing included: Messrs. and Mes- 
dames James Jackman, Francis Langton; 
Misses Anne Peters, Lorna Williamson, Con- 
stance Hart; Messrs. William Veach, Benno 
Hart, Jr. 

The Marin Golf and Country club at 
Lagunitas will be the scene of a kitchen 
shower and tea, which Mrs. Philip Foster- 
Brown will give in honor of Miss Alice 
Keeler. whose wedding on Monday to Rev. 
Henry Oohloff will be an event of the 
summer. 

John McMullin, who has made his home 
in London for the past three years, has re- 
turned to New York where he will be estab- 
lished permanently. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Edward White, who 
have been traveling in Alaska for the past 
few weeks, will return to San Mateo next 
week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dixwell Hewitt are on a 
motor trip through the Feather River 
country. 

California has an unusually interesting 
visitor in the person of Mrs. Edwin Romberg 
of Chicago, who is at present at Del Monte, 
accompanied by her two sons, Stanley and 
Louis Romberg. Mrs. Romberg is an 
authoress. 

Miss Geraldine Bonner of New York has 
come to California for the summer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis Langton entertained 
at an informal dinner party July 9 at the 
apartments at Stanford Court of Mrs. Lang- 
ton's mother. Mrs. H. M. A. Miller. Follow- 
ing the dinner, Mr. and Mrs. Langton and 
their guests completed the evening in dancing 
at the Hotel St. Francis. 

Miss Ellita Adams is visiting Miss Mary 
Elena Macondray in Menlo Park. 

Mrs. Samuel Hopkins and Sammy. Jr., are 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Harold W. Law at 
their place on Lake Tahoe. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Salisbury Field of 
Montecita are visiting in Gilroy as the guests 
of Mrs. Field's brother and sister-in-law. Mr. 
and Mrs. Lloyd Osborne. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Horsley Scott, Miss 
Frances Preston Ames and Miss Nancy Scott 
have taken a house in Pacific Grove, where 
they will pass the summer. 



Lieulenant-General Hunter Liggett is en 
route to Alaska where he will be detained 
for several weeks. 

Jan Carel Van Eck has returned from 
England and has joined his family at their 
home in San Mateo. 

Mrs. Anna Peterson and her daughter. 
Miss Maude Peterson, have returned fro?.i 
Panama, and are visiting at the Casa del 
Rey in Santa Cruz. 

Mrs. Bowditch Morton of New York ac- 
companied by Miss Augusta Ames, are at the 
Casa del Rey. 

Miss Elizabeth Adams is the house guest 
of Miss Mary Julia Crocker, at her summer 
home in Sonoma. 

Judge and Mrs. Edgar Zook of Marin 
have gone to Bolinas for the week-end. 

Mrs. Patrick Calhoun, who is visiting her 
daughter, Mrs. Paul Foster, at San Rafael 
for a month, was the guest of honor at a 
luncheon party given by Mrs. Frank P. 
Deering at her home recently. 

|Mrs. D. S. Lisberger and Mrs. Sylvan 
Lisberger were hostesses last Saturday after- 
noon at a delightful luncheon which they 
gave at the Woman's Athletic club in honor 
of Miss Fannie Hurst, the writer. Those asked 
to meet the guest of honor were: Dr. 
Aurelia Reinhart; Mesdames Palmer Lucas, 
Charles Staunton, Charles Bear, Benjamin F. 
Cohen of New York. M. P. F. Sloss. Ida 
Mackrill, Gertrude Atherton. 

Tuesday Miss Frances Pringle entertained 
the members of the sub-debutante set at a 



Service— 

at Willard's 

Goes beyond merely selling you the 
apparel you need 

— it assures absolute satisfaction. 
— a full dollar's worth of value 
for every dollar spent. 
— correctness in style with 
moderation in expense. 

Acquaintance will always develop 
a preference for Willard apparel 

WILLARD'S 

139-153 GEARY STREET 



BLANCO'S 


O'Farrell and Lai-kin Sts. 


Phone Franklin 9 


No visitor should leave the city without 


dining in the finest cafe in America 


Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 





July 17, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



luncheon, which she gave at her home in 
Menlo Park. 

Mrs. Gertrude Atherton has gone south 
to reopen her sudio in Los Angeles for two 
months. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Hobart motored down 
to their cottage at Pebble Beach with a party 
of friends, who will be their guests for the 
week-end. Those in the party were: Messrs. 
and Mesdames Evan Williams, Charles Mc- 
Cormick, Mrs. Frank Rohner. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Bishop will leave at the 
end of the month for Lake Tahoe, where 
they will visit at the summer home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Harold Law. 

Miss Ethel Maroney, Miss Rosario Moran 
and Miss Virginia Loop are leaving for Los 
Angeles, where they will visit for two weeks 
as the house guests of Mrs. L. N. Brunswick 
and her charming daughter, Miss Marguerite 
Brunswick. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jere J. Driscoll, accom- 
panied by John and Edward B. Driscoll, are 
at the Arlington hotel in Santa Barbara for 
a few days, en route to Los Angeles, where 
they will visit. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Gallois have taken the 
Kent cottage at Lake Tahoe, where they will 
pass the next two months. 

Miss Jennie Blair and Mrse. Georges de 
Latour are touring the battlefields of France. 
They will also visit in Belgium. 

Mrs. Arthur W. Foster and her daughter. 
Miss Louisiana Foster, are at their ranch in 
Sonoma county for the summer. 

Mrs. Henry Bothin was a luncheon hostess 
Tuesday, entertaining her guests at her home 
in Ross valley. 

Mr. and Mrs. Willis Polk are motoring 
through the mountains in the south and are 
now in Yosemite National Park. They are 
guests at Yosemite Lodge, and have one of 
the new bungalows. It is their intention to 
go to Glacier Point for a short stay before 
returning home. 

Mr. and Mrs. George P. McNear had as 
their guests at their Petaluma home over the 
week-end Mr. and Mrs. Howard Noffziger 
and Mr. and Mrs. Leo Korbel. 

Mrs. William Timlow is expected in Cali- 
fornia in the month of August. Miss Emily 
T imlow has gone to Tahoe as the guest ol 
her uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
Poett. 

Miss Cornelia Gwynn entertained a few 
friends at bridge and tea at her home on 
Jackson street last Thursday afternoon. 

Mrs. James Stewart Sampson, who has 
made her home in Salt Lake City for the last 
year, has returned and is the guest of Mis. 
Frederick Marriott at her apartments in Cali- 
fornia street. 

Vacation days at Del Monte are filled 
with pleasure for all. The society matron 
finds freedom from many pressing obliga- 
tions. The younger set in gay groups at the 



swimming pool, tennis courts and tea rooms. 
The juveniles enjoy picnics to the beach or 
the woods and all find the hours passing 
pleasantly along as they indulge in their 
favorite pastimes. Evenings find the Palm 
Grill a lively center for dancing, the lounge 
a popular rendezvous for an hour or two 
of cards. Music lovers find pleasure in the 
concert programs and lovers of art stroll 
through the Del Monte gallery and view at 
their leisure some of the finest paintings by 
California artists that have ever been ex- 
hibited. 

Mrs. Edwin Romberg of Chicago who has 
been at Den Monte for the past month with 
her two sons, Stanley and Louis Romberg, 
is one of the interesting persons of note tak- 
ing pleasure in the many enjoyments and 
pleasures at the Monterey resort. 

One of the familiar figures on the Del 
Monte golf links is Professor R. E. Allardice. 
His friend, Douglas Grant, now in England, 
is greatly missed by the professor, for they 
have spent many seasons together on the 
famous course. 



AT CASA DEL REY 

Mrs. Bowditch Morton of New York and 
Paris was the cynosure of many at the 
dance last Saturday evening at the Casa del 
Rey as she appeared in a jade green satin 
frock, handsomely embroidered and a hackle 
feather turban to match, which set off her 
titian coloring to good advantage. Miss 
Augusta D. Ames is with Mrs. Morton. 

Now that the excitement of the holidays 
is over, many family parties are enjoying the 
full delights of the beach at Santa Cruz. 

Dr. E. D. Keeffe is staying at the Casa del 
Rey with his wife and their two boys, Emmet 
and Edmund. 

Another happy family group at the hotel 
is Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Mohr with Mr. 
and Mrs. Rudolph Mohr, Jr.. and Master 
Rudolph Mohr. Jr. II. 



"TREASURE ISLAND" FILM 

The film version of Robert Louis Steven- 
son's "Treasure Island," is considered by 
European cities as very successful. In the 
main the original story has been followed 
very carefully, and it has been very 
ingeniously compressed without the loss of 
any essential incidents, so that the film takes 
only about an hour and a quarter to show. 
If Stevenson had been alive today he would 
certainly have joined that select band of 
authors who have elected to write direct for 
the screen. He was a born scenario writer 
in addition, of course, to being a very great 
literary craftsman — and his pen would be 
found very useful in these degenerate days, 
when novelists write like film authors and 
scenario writers try lo disguise themselves as 
novelists. 



We Casa del Rey 

is a million dollar fire-proof hotel, on 
the sunny bathing beach at Santa 
Cruz. It offers the advantages of 
tennis, golf, motoring, fishing and 
swimming, and is the center of Santa 
Cruz social life. 

MORRIS & WARNER. P.ops. 



HOTEL ST. MATTHEW 
AND GRILL 

217 Second Avenue, San Mateo 
SPECIAL SUNDAY DINNER $1.00 
MEALS A LA CARTE 

Special attention paid to banquets, automobile 
parties and tourists. The only first-class a la 
carle restaurant in San Mateo. The hotel is 
entirely new; hot and cold water in every room. 
All well lighted. Rooms with private bath. 
Prices moderate. Summer rates given. Elevator 
service. 



EPPLER'S 

BAKERY and LUNCH 

886 Geary Street 



Branch Confectionery 
SUTTER and POWELL STREETS 

Phone Douglas 1912 



The Cecil Hotel 

of San Francisco offers 
the perfect combination 
of home and hotel life. 
Cuisine excellent. Lux- 
ury of billiard, card and 
reading rooms. 

Mrs. O. E. MORRIS. Proprietor. 



J. B. Pou J. Bergez C. Lalanne 

L. Coutard C. Mailhebuau 

BERGEZ-FRANKS 

Old POODLE-DOG Co. 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

Music and Entertainment Every Evening 

4IS-42I Bu»h St.. San Francisco 

(Above Kearny) Exchange. Doug. 2411 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 17, 1920 



The Motorists 



The entire situation in the Pacific Coast 
automobile industry seems to have greatly 
improved within the last week or ten days. 
Where a fortnight ago there was considerable 
uncertainty in every phase of the business, 
now things have clarified so that every dis- 
tributor and dealer has a pretty clear idea 
as to how things stand and how they are 
going to move. 

"Ihings" include every item on the list 
from automobile and tires to accessories. 
The worst of the slump seems to be over, 
and in spite of the fact that the vacation 
season is at its height there is a decidedly 
normal tone to the whole automobile market 
with prospects of a very satisfactory fall. 

However, with the freight situation, 
nationally, not yet clarified and with the con- 
sequent production tie-up continued, there is 
little prospect of any drop in automobile 
prices for many months to come, and dis- 
tributors are advising their sub-dealers to this 

effect throughout their territories. 
¥ * 9 

The gas shortage has not yet succeeded in 
putting a crimp in the resort business of the 
State. Motorists continue to get enough gas 
to make trips to Yosemite and the other 
points most favored by the California vaca- 
tionists. Perhaps a few of the smaller re- 
sorts have suffered to a slight degree, but 
Camp Curry, the largest Yosemite resort, 
reports a contrary result — entertaining vastly 
bigger crowds than ever before in its history. 
One reason for this is, perhaps, the immense 
reserve supply of gasoline kept on hand at 
this resort, which insures every motorist a 
full tank on leaving. 

* * ¥ 

They are still talking about Lou H. Rose's 
Chalmers driveaway on San Francisco's auto- 
mobile "row." Last week a long line of 
Chalmers cars, fifty-three in number, paraded 
the city prior to being driven off under their 
own power to various local dealers through- 
out the State. These dealers participated in 
a dealers' conference at the Lou H. Rose 
headquarters here before returning to their 
homes. 

The driveaway, largest of recent date, was 
merely in the nature of an advance guard, as 
the fifty-three cars of which it was com- 
posed, form but a small portion of the total 
number of the last shipment Rose has re- 
ceived — 137 carloads in all, or 418 
Chalmers cars. 

Addition of a non-skid tire test to the 
other interesting features already planned for 
the Traffic Officers' convention and Safety 
First exposition to be held in this city, August 



23 to 27, is the latest news from head- 
quarters of the Traffic Officers' Association. 

Various makes of tires claiming non-skid 
qualities will be tried out on a wet-down 
street in the vicinity of the convention hall — 
the Exposition Auditorium — and certificates 
of merit issued in accordance with the re- 
sults. The Better Business Bureau of the 
Associated Advertising Clubs of the World 
will officially observe the tests as part of theii 
crusade for truth in advertising. 

The convention continues to assume more 
of an international aspect, although it was 
originally planned as merely a national gath- 
ering of experts on traffic questions and rep- 
resentatives of traffic bureaus of the various 
police departments of the country. Every 
city in the United States will be represented, 
and in addition a number of foreign coun- 
tries have asked permission to be represented 
at the convention sessions. They will urge 
internationalization of traffic regulations, 
and will take home with them the latest 
ideas on traffic control and on safety-first 
devices. 

* * * 

Need for the early completion of the 
Merced River highway to the Yosemite, 
money toward which was subscribed last 
year, is being voiced from numerous sources. 
C. D. Rand, Mercer and Jordan distributor 
for the Northern California dealer, is the 
latest to add a word in favor of pushing this 
road to completion. 

"Each passing season sees a greater num- 
ber of cars making the trip to California's 
greatest playground," he comments, "and 
the old routes are inadequate to handle the 
season's traffic and remain in first class con- 
dition." 

At present the Big Oak Flat is reported in 
better condition than the Wawona road, and 
Foster Curry of Camp Curry is quoted as 
advising Northern California motorists to 
take it in order to get their cars into the 
valley in the best of shape. 
.f. .¥ * 

"Keep your windshields clean, in summer 
as well as winter months," is the advice of 
Bernard Breeden of Breeden & Cole, Jackson 
Six distributors and manufacturers of 
speedster cars. "Many otherwise easily 
avoidable accidents are caused by dirty wind- 
shields obscuring the driver's vision," he de- 
clares. "The summer dust on country and 
mountain roads is just as dangerous as the 
rain and mud of winter in this respect. 

"Along the same line." continues Breeden, 
"the motorist who habitually rides around 
in a dirty-looking, dust-covered car, certainly 



shows a lack of the true Yankee swank. 
Keep your car looking neat and clean; 
wash it, or have it washed at regu- 
lar intervals; keep it in good condi- 
tion at all times, and you'll enjoy riding in it 
a great deal more. No matter how good- 
looking a car may be when it leaves the 
sales room floor, it can soon retrograde into 
a thing of dirt and grease if the owner .per- 
mits himself to become slovenly in this 
matter." 



CHARM OF REST AND QUIET 

Since the opening of the Aladdin Studio 
Tiffin Room it has been filled daily at the 
noon hour with people who appreciate not 
only cooking that cannot be surpassed, but 
also the charm of finding rest and quiet in 
one of the most delightful places ever opened 
in San Francisco; in fact, the lunch room 
is so unlike every other restaurant in town 
that it is being named by its patrons "the 
place that is different." Already Mrs. Lowe's 
entrees and Mollies individual pies have be- 
come locally famous. 

The clientele of this attractive lunch room 
is quite as interesting as the Oriental room 
itself, for it has become the rendezvous of 
newspaper writers whom all the city knows, 
as well as artists and lovers of refined bo- 
hemianism. 



TRADE F -F MARK 

"BATTERY BOOSTERS" 

ALTERNATING & DIRECT CURRENT 

SERVICE STATION SERVICE 
IN YOUR OWN GARAGE 




KEEP BATTERY ON CAR 

\ ?mall, light, compnct vv Battery Booster Is 
attached to any socket; screw a small pine in plan- 
um you 'i<> ii lump bulb and snap charring clips on 
battery terminals. Turn tin- switch mM lock the 
Borage door, knowing your battery will bo charged 
In tt e morning. 

The Sensation of Motordom 

Live County Distributors Wanted 

California Distributing Co. 

(Harold H. Harlmann) 

948 MARKET ST, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

P/tonc Kearny S377 



July 17. 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



Politics And The Army 



IN GEORGE CREEL'S new book, "The 
War, the World, and Wilson," occurs a 

statement of the reasons that sidetracked 
General Leonard Wood during the world 
war. General Wood, according to Mr. 

Creel, was not sent to France, "for the very 
good reason that General John J. Pershing, 
commander of the American Expeditionary 
forces, did not ask to have him sent." 

This statement seems singularly ironic, 
when we remember that General Pershing 
was appointed over Wood's head, and some 
exceedingly interesting results may be gar- 
nered from a moment's consideration of the 
facts of the situation. 

Those facts seem to show that politics 
governed military necessity, as often has 
happened in democracies. At the time that 
Pershing was appointed to the post in 
France, Wood was superior in command; he 
was under 60 years of age, and vigorous 
physically; he was desirous of going to 
France, and had a good record. Graduated 
from the Harvard medical school in 1884, 
he had a few months later joined the army 
as a surgeon. During the Spanish-American 
war he had served as colonel of the Rough 
Riders, with Roosevelt under him. Upon 
one of the brigadier general's being taken 
with the fever, he was made a brigadier, and 
achieved a uniformly excellent record. Later 
his record was no less good as military gov- 
ernor of Cuba, and in a high executive posi- 
tion in the Philippines. 

But Wood was guilty of having political 
ambitions, as recent events have brought 
forth, and what was moic, he was politic- 
ally dangerous, for he had been intimately 
associated with Roosevelt. If he had been 
sent to Europe, and had been as successful, 
as there was reason to expect, he might have 
become a popular idol, and his road to the 
presidency would have been made smoother. 
Since Wood was a Republican, the Demo- 
cratic administration evidently could not take 
such chances. Therefore they preferred 
Pershing, who had no political ambitions. 
When, upon the outbreak of the war. Wood 
wrote requesting that he be sent to France, 
he received no reply, but later on was in- 
formed that his post had been taken from 
him, and that he might have the choice of 
being stationed at Honolulu, the Philippines, 
or Charleston. South Carolina. 

The case of Leonard Wood reminds one 
of the politico-military game played in the 
WBI with Mexico ill 1846. We find an almost 
perfect analogy in the case of Winfield Scott 
and Zachary Taylor. Scott was the logical 
person to head the expedition, for he was 



commander-in-chief of the U. S. army and 
had proved his ability. He was physically 
strong, and was eager to lead the army of 
invasion. But in his stead they chose 
Zachary Taylor who was only a colonel. He 
was older than Scott, and wished to retire 
from military life and had no political ambi- 
tion. In fact, according to the statements of 
Grant, who served under him as a lieutenant, 
Taylor detested politics. 

lo the democratic administration of 
President Polk — the eleventh president of the 
United States — Colonel Zachary Taylor was 
exactly the man they desired, and he was 
placed at the head of the little force of 3700 
men with which the war on Mexico began — 
a most unjust political aggression of a 
strong nation against a weak one, asserted 
Grant. 

Taylor was a soldier of great natural 
ability, and began winning battles in Mexico, 
against superior numbers. His fame and 
popularity increased so rapidly that the 
Whig party began to talk of nominating him 
for president. 

At Washington, the growing political 
prominence of Taylor excited uneasiness, and 
steps were taken to prevent the victorious 
commander from becoming more popular. 
General Scott, the sidetracked commander- 
in-chief, was then ordered to take the field 
in Mexico, and divide the command with 
Taylor. It was hoped at Washington that 
the jealousies engendered between the com- 
manders would end in destroying both, and 
it did lead to dissatisfaction, though the war 
ended in the capture of the City of Mexico, 
and a treaty by which Texas and a large 
slice of the Pacific Coast was lost to 
Mexico. 

The political developments, following the 
victorious war with Mexico, upset the plans 
of the democratic administration at Wash- 
ington. General Zachary Taylor was nom- 
inated by the Whigs, and elected. He was 
inaugurated March 4. 1849 but died in the 
following year. 

General Winfield Scott obtained the Whig 
nomination for president in 1852, but was 
defeated so decisively that the organization 
dropped its title and disappeared from the 
political field. 

It would be hard to find any writer who by 
temperament and training is less fitted than 
Mr. George Creel to write of the Woods- 
Baker-Pershing affair or any part of the 
history of the late war. His field seems to be 
that of a partisan journalist, and it is unfor- 
tunate that any history of the great world 
war should emanate from his pen, as his 



official position of chief of publicity, gave 
him a meritorious distinction, unmerited by 
his qualities as a historian. 

However, so much misleading stuff about 
the war has gone into print that another 
issue of misstatements cannot obfuscate the 
public mind much more. 



AN EPOCH-MAKING DISCOVERY 

Discovered at last! — the reason why not 
every man is a sage, the way to make a 
Solomon of every one! Discoverer, Pro- 
fessor Hamilton of Flagstaff Observatory, 
who advances the most important theory of 
the age. The reason we have so many 
people with a wrong point of view — in a 
word, so many fools — is that in the first 
months of their lives, people are wheeled in 
the wrong direction. If this mistake is not 
corrected immediately, and if babies are not 
henceforth wheeled forward instead of back- 
ward, the professor believes men will hence- 
forth be deficient in "forward-looking and 
forward-reaching ambition." 

One wonders whether this profound but 
hitherto neglected fact was discovered in the 
course of the professor's investigations of the 
stars. It will surely be seized upon as a cure- 
all for all ills, and in the next generation, 
which will have the advantage of the new 
discovery, we expect that every man will be 
endowed with perfect wisdom, and that in- 
sane asylums and homes for the feeble- 
minded will have become relics of the unen- 
lightened past. 

Incidentally, we cannot help wondering 
how the professor was wheeled when an 
infant. We should advise him to investigate 
the matter. And since that is a matter of 
such profound racial importance, we should 
also suggest that he secure the passage of a 
law making it criminal to wheel a baby 
backward. 



E. F. HUTTON & GO. 



MEMBERS 



New York Stock Exchange 

490 California St. and St. Francis Hotel 
Branch: Del Monte Hotel 

Private Wires 
Coast to Coast 



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Give satisfactory results when given proper at- 
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storage batteries, etc.. and guarantee satisfaction. 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

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955 Post St. Phone Prospect 741 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 17, 1920 



Pleasure's Wand 



CLEVER FARCE AT ALCAZAR 

A farce comedy of an unusual nature 
keeps this week's Alcazar audience in high 
good humor. "On the Hiring Line" is very 
much as the title would indicate. Faced with 
the insurmountable problem of keeping 
servants in the country, a clever house- 
holder hits upon the idea of getting private 
detectives to act as cook and butler under 
the false impression that they are engaged in 
the detective business. A host of amusing 
complications arise when the detectives catch 
the daughter of the house conducting a ro- 
mantic adventure with a so-called chauffeur. 
The detectives act in a way anything but 
pleasant to their employer, but if he does not 
enjoy what ensues, it is certain that he differs 
from the audience in that respect. 

Dudley Ayres, who takes the part of the 
badgered employer of the detectives, acts 
with that skill which he has shown in every 
one of his Alcazar roles. Inez Ragan plays 
the part of his wife with marked success. 
Al Cunningham is excellent in the combined 
role of detective and butler. Anna Mc- 
Naughton is entertaining as his wife, and 
the other parts are played successfully by 
Jean Oliver, Emily Pinter, Rafael Brunetto. 
Brady Kline and Ben Erway. 



NEW ALCAZAR BILL 

"Peg 0' My Heart" has at last been se- 
cured by the Alcazar for its last and only 
week on the San Francisco stage, beginning 
at next Sunday's matinee. "Peg 0' My 
Heart." since its famous two years in New 
York, has smashed box office records in every 
American city, large and small. Its appeal 
is to every man, woman and child. Per- 
haps that is because it is so vitally whole- 
some and human as well as joyously humoi- 
ous and tenderly pathetic. It is one of those 
rare comedies that one never tires of seeing. 
Inez Ragan, the Alcazar's buoyant young 
leading woman, who is winning new friends 
this week, in "On the Hiring Line," should 
be an ideal "Peg," the high spirited little 
Irish-American girl, stubbornly patriotic in 
loyalty to the land of her birth, yet lovably 
and wittily Irish in her nature. Dudley 
Ayres has one of his favorite roles, the 
philosophical, happy-go-lucky Jerry, who is 
her friend and adorer. Very interesting will 
be the special engagement of beloved Emelie 
Melville, in the granddame role, which she 
created and played hundreds of times, in the 
original New York production of "Peg." 
Emily Pinter, Jean Oliver, Brady Kline, Ben 
Erway, and Rafael Brunetto will complete a 
perfect cast. 



"A Tailor Made Man," another notably 
popular success, to follow Sunday, July 25, 
is big in humor, romance, humanity and 
sheer audacity and in cast, for it has twenty- 
five speaking parts. It has been secured 
through special arrangement with Cohan and 
Harris. 



NEW ORPHEUM FEATURES 

Particular eminence marks the Orpheum 
bill which opens for a week's run Sunday 
matinee due to the presence of Irene Frank- 
lin, Eurton 'Green, Percy Bronson, Willie 
Baldwin, Louise Dresser, Jack Gardner and 
the "Creole Fashion Plate." 

Irene Franklin and Burton Green will be 
seen in their new act in which Miss Franklin 
sings numbers especially composed by her- 
self, with music and settings arranged by her 
partner. 

Percy Bronson and Winnie Baldwin will 
present their now famous comedy "Visions of 
1970" by Jack Lait. Their vehicle depicts 
what might happen in that year if an un- 
corked bottle of "extra dry" was discovered 
by one unfamiliar with its potent influence. 

The musical comedy stars, Louise Dresser 
and Jack Gardner, who are teaming this 
season in a cycle of individual songs, form 
the only act which holds over from the 
present week. 

The "Creole Fashion Plate," described as 
a delineator of song and fashion, also will 
be adorned with ultra voguish garments and 
will display a voice of rare piquancy and 
charm, it is said. 

Val and Ernie Stanton, called "English 
boys from America," will cause laughter to 
spread like a prairie fire, is the advance 
assertion. "The man off the ice wagon" who 
was discovered recently when delivering his 
commodity to New York apartment houses, 
will be heard in song. Three Danoise sisters, 
known for their beauty, grace and agility, 
end Chong and Rosie Moey with a Chinese 
version of American songs and dances, are 
other newcomers. Topics of the Day and 
Weekly news ever are other features. 



ENTERTAINING BILL AT ORPHEUM 

Again the Orpheum program is one of 
many features, and this week's bill, as usual, 
provides entertainment as interesting and 
varied in its nature. Perhaps the chief attrac- 
tion is the skit, "Peg for Short," in which 
Elsa Ryan supplies some excellent comedy. 
The heroine begins activities by fainting on 
the doorstep, and as a result gets acquainted 
with the downstairs neighbors, with generally 



satisfactory results. Miss Ryan is excellently 
assisted by Rodney Ranous. 

Another big feature is that of Louise 
Dresser and Jack Gardner who present a 
most enjoyable musical comedy act. Other 
noteworthy acts are presented by Clara 
Morton, in singing and dancing; by the 
Novelty Clintons, in unusual acrobatic feats; 
by Harrison Greene, and Katherine Parker, 
in a blackface comedy act entitled "At the 
Depot"; by Palo and Palet, who perform on 
a number of musical instruments, including 
the accordion, the saxaphone, the cornet, 
and the flute; by Anita Diaz and her troupe 
of trained monkeys in a series of well per- 
formed and difficult tricks; and by the actors 
in "Kiss Me," the musical comedy act held 
over from last week. 



The Phelan managers say that never 

before did the San Francisco senator dis- 
play such political speed as this year — and 
he never has been a lame duck in politics. 
He is out to win under the banner, "Swat 
the Japs!" and in fact has the copyright on 
that slogan. 




Starting Sunday Matinee 



IRENE FRANKLIN 
BURTON GREEN 



THE STANTONS 

PERCY 
BRONSON 

WINNIE 
BALDWIN 



"THE MAN OFF THE ICE WAGON" 

LOUISE 
DRESSER 



JACK 
GARDNER 

THREE DANOISE SISTERS I CHONC & ROSIE MOEY 

"CREOLE FASHION PLATE" 

Evening Prices— 25c, 50c, 7.>e, $i 

Mb i iuei Prlo — 2 ic, 60c, i ie 

( Exn*i»i Saturdays, Snndays and Holidays) 

MATINEE DAILY— Phono Douglas 7u 



ALCAZAR 

This Week— The Laughing Hit 
"ON THE HIRING LINE- 
ONE WEEK COM. NEXT SUN. JULY 18 
Secure Scats Early for the Best Drawing Comedy 
on the Stage 

"PEG 0' MY HEART" 

A Breath of Perfume from a Rose-Scented Cardcn 

That has Gladdened Millions of Hearts by 

Its Wit, Sparkle and Tenderness 

THE ALCAZAR COMPANY 

INEZ RAGAN AND DUDLEY AYRES 

SUNDAY MAT. JULY 25— Great Comedy 

Immensely Popular Cohan and Harris Success 

"A TAILOR MADE MAN" 

A play of Humor, Humanity and Happiness. 

SOON— "FAIR AND WARMER" 

Every Eve — Mats. Sund. Thurs., Sat. 



July 17, 1920 

THE HOUSING PROBLEM 

San Francisco property owners should pay 
attention to the proceedings in New York 
to solve the housing problem, for in New 
York it is realized that the building ques- 
tion is one of the most serious of the day. 

An interesting statement has just been sub- 
mitted to the municipal authorities by Allan 
Robinson, president of a housing corpora- 
tion which has 12,000 tenants in New York. 

Mr. Robinson does not defend profiteering 
landlords, but he does believe that the time 
has come when in and for the best interests 
of tenants as individuals and the community 
as a whole investment in real estate should 
be encouraged rather than discouraged by 
attacks which are founded on prejudice 
rather than facts. 

His corporation increased its rentals dur- 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

ing the past year an average of 14 per cent., 
without losing a tenant on account of the 
increase. He frankly states that another in- 
crease is inevitable in September. 

Legislation in New York has allowed the 
landlords a raise of 25 per cent. 

Mr. Robinson's corporation figures to 
make only 5 per cent net on the investment 
and finds it no easy task, owing to the in- 
creased expenses. He states: 

"The price of our coal in the last three 
years has gone up 300 per cent, mechanics' 
wages 50 per cent, porters' wages 150 per 
cent and engineers, firemen and coal passers' 
wages 200 per cent. In our two largest prop- 
erties the coal requirements per day in the 
cold winter days amount to sixty-five tons 
and the daily cost this year was $313 over 



the cost three years ago, or a weekly in- 




Percy Bromon and Winnie Baldwin, Wno Will Appear at the Orpheum Neil Wee^. 

~ — ~-.:.: :-:: — 



17 

crease of $2 1 84. Besides coal, the company 
buys in the course of the year over $57,000 
worth of supplies of various kinds for clean- 
ing, plant operation and mechanical repairs, 
and the price of these various supplies has 
risen from 50 per cent to 1 50 per cent. 

"In the last year wage increases have 
raised the weekly payroll from $2113.55 to 
$3146.36, an increase in this one department 
alone of 49 per cent. 

"Notwithstanding the fact that the uncer- 
tainties in the building situation and the rent 
legislation combine to halt the erection of 
needed homes capital ought to go into 
building." 

It will not go into it at a net profit of 5 
per cent on the investment. That is certain. 

"The relation of landlord and tenant is a 
delicate one at the best," says Mr. Robinson, 
"probably the most delicate relation in the 
entire economic field and I fear that the rent 
legislation in singling out real estate will tend 
to make that form of investment unpopular 
at the time when it is most important that 
new capital be directed to it." 



Crimsonbeak — I understand that prohibi- 
tion worker is going away for a <4>ange. 
Yer st — Really? Where is he going? Gim- 
sonbeak — To Havana. 



"He is quite an artist, isn't he?" asked 
Smith. "Yes," replied Jones. "He painted 
an apple last week, and the critics all agreed 
that it was rotten." 



On the Irish question, however, the G. 0. 
P. refused to stand Pat. 



V.e ciy loudly for a man of vision and 
when we get one we call him a visionary. 



"I lave you ever thought of retiring from 
politics?" "Yes," replied Senator Sorghum : 
' but alwrys with a shudder." 



ALADDIN 
STUDIO 
TIFFIN 
ROOM 

220 POST V FOURTH FLOOR 

SAN FRANCISCO 

m 

SPECIALIZING FIFTY CENT 
LUNCH 



HATTIE MOOSER 
M. C MOOSER 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 17. 1920 



COHAN AND HARRIS SEPARATE 

Two of the best known dramatic producers 
in America are George M. Cohan and Sam 
M. Harris. The plays of the former have 
been produced many times in San Francisco, 
where he is especially popular. The disso- 
lution of their partnership is therefore of 
special interest, particularly as it has in it 
something of the mysterious. 

These theatrical men are apparently on 
the best of terms, both speak most cordially 
of the other, and they have offices in the 
same building. No valid reason why the two 
partners should take separate roads in the 
future has ever been made public, and 
gossip along Broadway has it that Sam 
Harris is as much in the dark in the matter 
as the general public. 

Few figures in the theatrical world have 
had as picturesque careers as Cohan and 
Harris, and few producers have been more 
successful. The windup of the producing 
firm recalls to memory its informal origin. 
The firm of Cohan & Harris grew out of a 
baseball game at an outing of song writers on 
Staten Island. The game in the language of 
Cohan, was "one of those words versus music 
affairs." Cohan caught and Harris pitched 
for one of the teams, although the latter was 
a "ringer" as he was not a bona fide song 
writer. + 

During the game George and Sam be- 
came very chummy and one of the two made 
a suggestion that they go into partnership. 
A verbal agreement was made on the spot, 
and that agreement lasted until last week. 
Previous to his association with Cohan, 
Harris had been identified with the produc- 
tion of "The Fatal Wedding" and other lurid 
melodramas, and was a member of the theat- 
rical firm of Sullivan, Harris and A. H. 
Woods. 

Cohan had previously been in vaudeville 
as a member of the "Four Cohans" and had 
made a few ventures on the musical 
stage, but the great success attained by both 
Cohan and Harris came after the formation 
of their partnership. Harris, who had been 
self-supporting from the age of I I years, 
and who had engaged in various commercial 
ventures before turning his attention to the 
theatre, was always the executive head of 
the firm, and Cohan was the star and play- 
wright. When the firm first started it had 
only one play in its possession, "Little 
Johnny Jones," by Cohan, but that was 
sufficient to set it on the road to fortune. 



— There are many garages in town and the 
motorist is often in a quandary as to where 
to go, especially for permanent service. 
There are very few who give you the quality 
of service of Dow & Green, on Taylor street, 
between O'Farrell and Geary. Here your car 
will receive something more than the "once 
over," and the prices are moderate. 



A MODEST CANDIDATE 

When a rare case of modesty is brought 
to our attention, we believe in letting it be 
publicly known, and in congratulating the 
possessor of the modesty. And surely no 
more modest act could be conceived of than 
that of the proprietor of the Hearst papers, 
mentioned on the front page of said Hearst 
papers, in refusing the Third Party nomina- 
tion for the presidency before it was offered 
him. The fact that Senator LaFollette has 
been spoken of most prominently for that 
nomination only proves the more how much 
Mr. Hearst has desired to keep in the back- 
ground. The next thing that we may expect 
is for him to refuse a seat on the supreme 
court before it is vacated, or to decline to be 
ambassador to England before he is given 
that opportunity. 



TECHAU TAVERN ANNOUNCES 

A NEW DEPARTURE 

Always the center of new features, Techau 
Tavern has inaugurated an After Theater 
Special in the nature of a novel Souvenir 
Dance. Every dance following supper after 
the theater is a Souvenir Dance. Hilson's 
Ladies' Toggery orders and Melachrino 
cigarettes are given as favors to the lucky 
ones. "Compare the music" is the com- 
pendium of praise for the dulcet tunes played 
by the Techau Tavern dance orchestra, 
which is the favored attraction of those who 
follow the latest in dance music and dancing 
attractions. The artists revue still holds its 
place in the spotlight by virtue of its clever 
revues, colorful costumes, sparkling dances 
and charming beauty of its talented girls who 
compose its ensemble. 



Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 



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Graneys Billiard Parlor 



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Perfect Ventilation 
924 Market Street 
61 Eddy Street 



EDDIE GRANEY, Proprietor 



U. S. GARAGE 

750 Bush St. Phone Garfield 713 



PEARSON GARAGE 

345 Bush St. Phone Douglas 2120 

Repair Shop and Annex 350 Bush St. 



Largest and Most Complete Garages in 
the West 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



Pioneer 


Carpet Cleaning Works 


Renovating Sewing Laying Sizing 


Especially Equipped for Handling 


Valuable Rugs and Carpets 


Prompt MOTOR TRUCK SERVICE 


Established 1868 Tel. Doug. 3084 


353 Tehama St. 



Old Hampshire Bond 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

I Re SlancWd Paper for Business Stationery. 
"Made a iitlle better than seems necessary." The 
typewriter papers are sold in attractive and durable 
boxes containing fi\e hundred perfect sheets, plain 
or marginal ruled. The manuscript covers are sold 
in similar hoxes containing one hundred sheets. 
Order through your ptinter or stationer, or, if so de- 
sired we will send a sample book showing the tntne 
line. 

BLAKE, MOFF1T & TGWNE 

Established 1855 
J7-45 FIRST STREET SAN I RAW ISCO 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PL'BLIC 

INSURANCE BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 391 San Fr.-.ncisco 



Goshall — I see by the paper scientists arf 
trying to establish communication with Mars. 
Hemlock — I hope they never succeed. 
Goshall — Why not? Hemlock — You just 
oughta see my long-distance telephone bill 
for this month. 



"What's the difference between the old 
Nihilism and Bolshevism?" "The Nihilists 
wanted to keep everybody from having any- 
thing, while the Bolshevists want to grab 
everything in sight." 



"Morning, stranger," began the talkative 
party as he settled himself in the only vacant 
half-seat in the smoker. "And what State 
might you be from?" "Oh," replied the 
stranger wearily, "it doesn't matter now. 
One's as dry as another." 



"Does your family look ahead?" "Yes," 
replied Mr. Cumrox. "Mother and the girls 
look ahead 'most too much. We spend all 
winter thinking about where we'll live next 
summer and all summer thinking about where 
we'll live next winter." 



Flatbush — Do you and your wife get along 
pretty well? Bensonhurst — Oh. yes. Flat- 
bush — And have you both similar tastes. 
Bensonhurst — I think so. 1 don't believes 
she likes her cooking either. 



Newitt — Yes, old Goodman's three boys 
are a bad lot. Two of them at least ought to 
be sent to jail. Brown — Some redeeming 
quality about the third, eh? Newitt — Yes; 
he's already there. 



Mrs. Flatte — What was it I told you a little 
while ago. John? Mr. Flatte — I don't know, 
dear; I wasn't listening. Mrs. Flatte — Now 
isn't (hat provoking? And I just can't think 
what it was to repeat it! 



Doctor — Your wife's mind is completely 
gone. Hubby — Well, I'm not surprised. 
She's been giving me a piece of it every day 
for about two years. 



Bridget O'Flynn — Toimes have changed, 
indade. Norah OToole — Tis true fur yez! 
Oi used to cook fur women that Oi wouldn't 
play bridge wid nowadays. — Life. 



"Should a wife tell her husband every- 
thing?" "There's isn't time. He has to work 
seven or eight houis a day." — Judge. 



Jonah was much perturbed. "You can't 
even try to live in a whale without being 
evicted in three days." he mourned. 



Nip — What's the diference between a 
dance and a dawnce? Tuck — About four 
bucks. 



Wedding Presents: The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell streets. 

SUMMONS 

105936 

In the Superior Court of the State of California 

in and for the City and County of San Francisco. 
Olga Elizabeth Ennis, Plaintiff, 

vs. 
John Cradock Ennis, Defendant. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the 
State of California in and for the City and County 
of San Francisco, and the complaint filed in the 
office of the County Clerk of said City and County. 

The people of the State of California send greet- 
ing to John Cradock Ennis and Mrs. J. Avrillaud, 
Defendants. 

You are hereby required to appear in an action 
brought against you by the above named Plaintiff in 
the Superior Court of the State of California, in 
and for the City and County of San Francisco, and 
to answer the Complaint filed therein within ten days 
(exclusive of the day of service) after the service on 
you of this summons, if served within this City and 
County; or if served elsewhere within thirty days. 

The said action is brought to obtain a judgment 
and decree of this Court dissolving the bonds of 
matrimony now existing between plaintiff and de- 
fendant, on the ground of defendant John Cradock 
Ennis' adultery with said Mrs. J. Avrillaud, and of 
said John Cradock Ennis' desertion of plaintiff, also 
for general relief, as will more fully appear in the 
Complaint on file, to which special reference is 
hereby made. 

And you are hereby notified that, unless you ap- 
pear and answer as above required, the said Plain- 
liff will take judgment for any moneys or damages 
demanded in the Complaint as arising upon contract, 
or will apply lo the Court for any other relief de- 
manded in the Complaint. 

Given under my hand and the Seal of the Super- 
ior Court of the State of California, in and for the 
City and County of San Francisco, this 15th day of 
April A. D. 1920. 
(Seal) H. 1. MULCRF.YY. Clerk. 

By L. |. WELCH. Depulv Clerk 
Frank D. Macbeth. 508 Humboldt Bank Bid".. San 
Francisco. Cal.. Attorney for Plaintiff. 



CLOCK 
Rl PAIRING 




ALL MAKES 
OF CLOCKS 
REPAIRED 



WATCH DEPARTMENT 

Chimes and complicated clocks a specialty 
Clocks kept in order by contract, town and 

country 

\\ e carry an attractive line of new clocks 

\\ ork guaranteed in every detail 

CALIFORNIA CLOCK CO. 



Phone Garfield 2570 



I I > Geary Street 
J. Topping. Manager 



Potted Plants 
and Ferns 

OF DISTINCTION 

SUITABLE FOR ANY 

OCCASION AT NURSERY 

PRICES 

Bay Counties Seed Co. and 

Nurseries 

-104 Market Street. San Francisco 



n 



STATEMENT 

Of The Condition and Value of the Assets and Liabilities 

of 

5ty? 3j.ib?rnnt fairings m\h 3Gnan Swtrty 

(HIBERNIA BANK) 

i 

DATED JUNE 30, 1920 



ASSETS 



l_Bonds of the United States ($12,697,600.00) 
of the Stale of California and the Cities and 
counties there of ($12,693,025.00), of the 
State of New York ($2,149X00.00). of the 
City of New York ($1,000,000.00). of the 
State of Massachusetts ($1,162,000.00). 
of the County of Bergen. New Jersey 
($200.0C0.00). of the County of Cuyahago. 
Ohio. ($90,000.00), of the City of Chicago 
($645,000.00). of the City of Cleveland 
($100 030.00). of the City of Albany 
($200,000.00), of the City of St. Paul 
($100X03.00). of the City of Philadelphia 
($350,000.00). of the City of San Antonio, 
Texas ($72,000.00). the actual value of 
which is $31,373,497.47 

2 — Miscellaneous Bonds comprising Steam Rail- 
way Bonds ($1,768,000.00), Street Rail- 
way Bonds ($1,486,594.51). Quasi-Public 
Corporation Bonds ($2,334,000.00). Mu- 
nicipal Notes ($1,525,000.00). and Bankers 
Acceptances ($127,356.00). the actual 
value of which is 6,666,424.17 

3— Cash on Hand 3,534,879.44 

4 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby se- 
cured, the actual value of which is 29,011,525.34 

Said Promissory Notes are all existing 
Contracts, owned by said Corporation, and 
the payment thereof is secured by First 
Mortgages on Real Estate within this State, 
and the States of Oregon. Nevada and 
Washington. 



5 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby se- 
cured, the actual value of which is 

Said Promissory Notes are all existing 
Contracts, owned by said Corporation, and 
are payable to it at its office, and the pay- 



296,761.04 



ment thereof is secured by pledge of Bonds 
and other securities. 

6 — (a) Real Estate situate in the City and 
County of San Francisco ($517,655.45), 
and in the Counties of Alameda ($33,- 
019.20), San Mateo ($33,980.50). Los 
Angeles ($74,680.70). Contra Costa ($73.- 
073.29). and Sonoma ($27,083.86), in 

this State, the actual value of which is 

(b) The Land and Building in which said 
Corporation keeps its said office, the actual 
value of which is 



759,493.00 



972,330.47 



TOTAL ASSETS $72,614,910.93 

LIABILITIES 

1 — Said Corporation owes Deposits amounting 

to and the actual value of which is $69,940,008.20 

Number of Depositors 81,300 

Average Deposit $860.24 
2— Reserve Fund, Actual Value 2,674,902.73 



TOTAL LIABILITIES $72,614,910.93 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

By E. J. TOBIN. President 
THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 
By R. M. TOBIN. Secretary. 

STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 
City and County of San Francisco — ss. 

E. J. TOBIN and R. M. TOBIN. being each duly sworn, each for 
himself says: Thai said E. J. TOBIN is Presidenl and that said R. M- 
TOBIN is Secretary of THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN 
SOCIETY, ihc Corporation above mentioned, and that the foregoing 
statement is true. 

E. J. TOBIN. President. 

R. M. TOBIN. Secretary. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 2d day of July, 1920. 

CHAS. T. STANLEY, 

Notary Public in and for the City and Counly of 
San Francisco, Slate of California. 






t WW/W/W-y/w;^^^^^ 



^ 



*i 



i 



.* 









-■ ^ 



STATB 




Motor Party Enjoying an Outing Under Our Stately Eucalyptus Trees. 



NOTICE TO 

CADILLAC OWNERS 



Kelsey Rims are standard factory equipment for Cadillac Automobiles, 
which fact in itself is sufficient indorsement of the efficiency of Kelsey Rims. 

No part of an automobile should be neglected. The same care that you 
exercise in saving the engine and other parts from neglect and abuse should 
be extended to the wheel equipment to secure maximum service. 

It is most important to Cadillac owners, therefore, that the Kelsey Rim 
equipment on their cars should be regularly inspected by Kelsey Rim experts 
to prevent premature wear of rims, tires and the car itself, as well as to avoid 
possible accidents from the development of defective wheel equipment 
caused by neglect or abuse. 

Changing tires mounted on Kelsey Rims and moving same from one 
wheel to another should be done, as far as possible, only by service help 
practically experienced in handling Kelsey Rim material. 

Expert Kelsey Rim service for Cadillac Car owners has been established 
through the appointment of the Keaton Tire and Rubber Company as Coast 
Distributors of Kelsey Rims and Parts, the standard equipment for Cadillac 
cars. Expert specialized Kelsey Rim service may be secured from any of the 
Branches of the Keaton Tire and Rubbei Company at address indicated below, 
and the service is free. 

Further — Cadillac owners will be glad to know that their 
rim requirements, including spare rims, bolts and clamps, 
will be promptly and expertly filled olfactory established 
prices by the Keaton Tire and Rubber Company as 
regularly authorized distributors for the manufacturers. 



KEATON TIRE AND RUBBER CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 
636 Van Ness Ave. 

Phone Prospect 324 



"The Rim House" 



LOS ANGELES-PORTLAND-SEATTLE 



OAKLAND 
2811 Broadway 

Phone Lakeside 126 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856. 




Devoted lo the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. XCVIII. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., SATURDAY, JULY 24, 1920 



No. 3 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA AD- 
VERTISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 259 Minna Street, near Fourth, San Francisco, Caj. Telephone 
Kearny 720. Entered at San Francisco. Cal., Post-Office as second-class mail 
matter. 

London Office — George Street & Company, 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) — I year, $2.50. Foreign: I year $5. 
Canada: I year, $3.50. 

Isn't it about time to pension off "Uncle Joe" Cannon along 

with the rest of the antiquarians? 



Would General Wrangel, anti-Bolshevik leader, fight as well 

by any other name? 



It is a pity that more of the Hohenzollern family do not 

follow the example of Joachim. It would save the world a lot of 
bother. 



Julius Kahn, the Perennial Representative Californicus, filed 

candidacy papers last week. Julius is like the poor. We have him 
always with us. 



What powerful anodyne must have been contained in that 

"fairy" cocktail given by Mr. Law! Would that nations verging on 
war could be lulled by some such concoction into an apathy of many 
years' duration. 



The harder the yellow races fight among themselves, the 

better for the white peoples in the inevitable clash which is coming 
between the two. So I say when I read the dispatches from Pekin 
and Tientsin, "Go to it! More power to you all!" 



After being assured that the late great war was a war against 

war, that we were fighting for peace, that never again would the 
poor world be plunged into slaughter, doesn't it make you blue lo 
read headings like this: "Red Cavalry Wiped Out by White Army?" 



The fair sex of Kansas should be entitled to vote, whether or 

not they tell their exact age in registering, — so thinks Richard J. 
Hopkins, attorney general. Poor, unsophisticated man! Did he 
really believe that women, in registering, or any other occupation. 
e\cr told the truth about their ages? 



There is a movement on in Michigan to abolish all Catholic 

schools. (We have not gained this from the press.) America, with 
the knowledge of hideous European wars brought about in the 
name of religion, of all countries, should allow her people to follow 
any creed they choose, just so long as they keep within our laws 
regarding disturbing the peace, etc. Surely the hysterical Evangelist 
meetings, the practices of "Holy Rollers." the wild shouting of such 
fanatics as Billy Sunday, or the hideous tragedies of the Mormon 
Church (which still exists) are more objectionable than any 
teachings of dignified Catholicism! 



That we are still in the dark ages as regards women, is 

evinced by the news that the crew of the Shamrock IV. oppose a 
woman as timekeeper on a cup racing yacht. In the name of all 
reason, why this superstition? No doubt if Lipton loses, the blame 
will be put upon Mrs. Burton, who has officiated in this capacity. 
Lipton's womanly way of changing his skipper at every race might 
be held accountable with more reason. 



Gradually the feeling of gratitude ( ?) which the Allies should 

have for the United States of America, is being evinced by their 
subjects. The incident on July 4th, when British sailors trampled on 
the American flag at Bermuda, is only another demonstration. It was 
slightly ruder than the remark of a French woman I have been told 
of, in Paris, who exclaimed: "Why do you Americans stay in 
France? We do not need you any more!" 



Some of the subterfuges of the "wets" to get around prohi- 
bition are as ridiculous as certain laws of the game and fish 
commission. In the latter jurisdiction a person is allowed to shoot 
pests (such as rabbits and squirrels) out of season, but is not allowed 
to devour the same. Under a ruling made by Commissioner of 
Internal Revenue Williams, a person may buy food which contains 
intoxicating liquors, but is prohibited from consuming it on the 
premises where it is purchased. 



The old argument of the "drys" that with prohibition crimes 

will decrease, pales somewhat before the news which comes from 
Chicago, as regards the crowded condition of its jails. In spite of 
the appalling record of "fifteen hangings inside of two days," the 
fact remains that the penitentiary "is infested with a great number 
of murderers, and hundreds more are still at large." 



Los Angeles has been suffering an attack of the same 

disturbing malady from which San Francisco suffered over fourteen 
years ago. although her mayor appears to be applying the ethics 
of Christian Science (whether he is a convert to that belief or not) 
with praise worthy zealousness. and has endeavored to demonstrate 
that his city hasn't even a "claim" (as our scientific brothers would 
say) to an earthquake. There has been no "material" damage, he 
asserts (except the falling of chimneys, broken facades and tower 
ornaments, and windows, and parting of seams in brick walls) and 
entreats the residents pathetically not to exaggerate the account to 
the "folks" back in the "old home towns." "Remember, that truth 
is priceless." he say?, "and think what harm you may be doing 
to business interests in Los Angeles." The words "business interests" 
(which, in the city of the Angels mean mostly "real estate interests") 
seem sort of uncomfortable in proximity with the word "truth." Or 
am I supersensttne? However, let us hope that the "mortal minds" 
of our Southern city have endured the earthquake — or whatever it 
was that visited them — with the same fortitude which our own good 
gray city displayed many years ago, in a similar crisis. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 24. 1920 



Editorial 



Powyss, the English writer, once said of 
San Francisco's Charms San Francisco, that its charm lay in the 
fact that while it had all the advantages 
of a great city, still it seemed fundamentally to be close to nature. 
I have always felt this. With the setting of blue bay. and brown 
hills in the background, its sea breezes, the gray gulls flying cease- 
lessly to and fro; the wonderful Park and ocean so easily reached; 
the Presidio hills, with their unsurpassed view, — all these beauties 
make one forget that we are the most important municipality on the 
Coast, the clearing house of America and the Orient. 

San Franciscans, unlike New Yorkers, do not have to hang to 
the straps of crowded cars, and ride through level mile upon mile 
of gray, uninteresting houses before they come to the open country. 
Or be shot through stifling tunnels, or whirled overhead on swaying 
trestles! Thank heaven, we have as yet no elevated nor subway, 
and every hill that our street cars climb, opens up some lively vista 
to delight the vision. 

On Russian Hill, which is virtually in the heart of the city. I knew 
and watched at least thirty different species of birds, and listened 
to their songs throughout the year. There was an indefinably 
woodsy smell to the large garden around my tiny house, which had 
no communion with the usual odors of a city. When the fog swept 
in from the ocean, it brought with it the uncontaminated, salt breath 
of seaweed and the sea. and the stars shining through the latticed 
porch, shone with no smoky mists to dim their luster. 

I, for one, am thankful that we are not a manufacturing center, 
that our primal business is the trade of the seas, with all the romance 
that will always cling to ships, from the ungainly old "freighter" to 
the grace of the fast vanishing sailing vessel. 

And when I read the complimentary things that are being said in 
Eastern papers of San Francisco, by all the "conventioners," I only 
wonder why the East took so long to discover our very obvious 
charms! 



Up to the present writing, the "Invisible 
Let There Be Light! Few" who govern the United States of 

America, have not fastened a meter to our 
old friend the sun. nor put a war tax onto the breezes that blow from 
the seven seas, over the wearied, toil-scarred land. Old Sol. 
without let or hindrance, scatters his beams broadcast, alike on 
profiteer and pauper, or erstwhile delegate and delegatess. I 
believe that in France and Belgium a tax still exists on windows and 
doors, and even in England such a law was once operated. Some 
friends of mine, traveling in the British Isles, remarked upon the 
number of boarded-up windows in some of the old manor houses, 
and were told that they were the visible signs of an antiquated 
amendment. However, be that as it may. so far, such a govern- 
mental atrocity has not been perpetrated upon the people of this 
great Republic. 

So, when we stumble up dark stairs in city apartments, and along 
Stygian halls, in danger of breaking our legs or necks, we wonder 
impatiently why, in the name of humanity, more light cannot be 
disseminated upon the scene; light from the heavens, which so far 
remain unstained and unpolluted by man; the kind heavens, whose 
azure depths rest the tired vision throughout the work-weary day; 
the dark purple, faithful heavens, whose stars will always be our 
inspiration and our comfort in the lonely nights! No blessed sun- 
beams can struggle into these gloomy corners; no refreshing breath 
of wind can blow through these shadowy, carpeted tunnels. We 
peer at every door for the number we are seeking, and when at last 



it is found, and we are shown into a fairly well-lighted room, we 
blink like blinded owls! 

If this transient experience is disagreeable to us, what effect must 
this deprivation of light have upon workers who spend their lives 
straining their eye-sight in dimly lighted work-shops, — or what is 
nearly as hurtful, — laboring under the injurious glare of electricity! 
Go to any optician, and he will tell you that eye-glasses are becoming 
as much of a necessity as hats or shoes, and that every year the 
number of children among his applicants grows alarmingly. Some 
French scientist has said that in another fifty years the human race 
will be toothless, hairless, and eyeless, and that this condition will be 
brought about by the increasing use of artificial light. Surely it does 
not need much stretching of the imagination to picture us all as 
blinded, groping moles! 

Especially is this lack of light noticeable in the printing shops of 
San Francisco. There are only a few printing plants among the 
dozens in this city that are built with the view of making the nerve- 
racking, eye-straining occupation of type-setting as easy as possible. 
A bookkeeper generally secures a position by a window, providing 
there is one, a stenographer demands light to hammer her typewriter 
by. but a compositor is crowded away into a corner, and left to 
handle his nonpareil as best he may. The years go by, and his eye- 
sight grows dimmer and dimmer, and by and by he finds himself 
fumbling at his work, and realizes the utter hopelessness of trying to 
stay "on the job" with his sight gradually leaving. And when a 
man's eyes are gone, his life is gone! 

There is no excuse for this condition of affairs except the thought- 
lessness of the ordinary employer, and the apparent indifference of 
the unions of the different printing trades. Shorter hours are 
requested, and higher pay, — but neither of these demands are as 
important in the lives of the workers as adequate light to work by. 
Higher pay means "Speeding up," and shorter hours mean less time 
in which to speed up, but good light for those wonderful and much- 
abused organs of ours — our eyes — mean more to us than we will 
ever realize, until the sad, gray curtain of blindness is drawn over 
them! 



The award has at last been handed down in 
Rail Wage Award the matter of the railroad workers and the 
aggregate is six hundred millions. This is a 
colossal sum, not too much perhaps, to pay as the price of peace 
in an industry as vital as is the railroad industry, for a strike would 
easily and in a very short time devour much more than that amount 
of money. But do we thereby avoid a strike? That is not at all 
certain, for the heads of the unions are unable, apparently to make 
up their minds as to its acceptability and are dodging the issue by 
asking for a referendum. One cannot with reason object to that, for 
the throwing of a mass of workers like the railroad workers out of 
employment at the present time would be nothing short of a national 
calamity. It is not to be wondered at that the chiefs of the unions 
are loath to shoulder such a responsibility. But what of the 
rest of us? 

For some thirty days or so the industry of the country will be 
anxiously awaiting the result of the votes of the unions, individually 
by groups; at first to see if the award is satisfactory to the separate 
groups, and then by referendum of the whole body of employees if 
the award is not satisfactory. 

We are informed that even if there is to be a strike, it will not 
occur prior to September 1st. at which time the last vestiges of 
Federal control will have been abolished in the railroad system. 
So that there is to be a long period of anxious and worried waiting 
and business interests which even now are none too secure, will be 
imperilled and possibly destroyed in many cases. It cannot be said 
to be otherwise than extremely unsatisfactory. 

For this award has in the long run to be paid by the general 
public. The workmen who get the increase as producers (for after 
all transportation is a form of production), will have to pay it back 



July 24, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



again as consumers and the additional burden will fall on the 
shoulders of the middle class and the struggling commercialist who 
are having even now a very hard time to make both ends meet. 
The railroads are to raise freight and passenger rates to meet the 
enforced raise in wages and this raise again falls upon industry which 
is already overburdened with the imposition upon it of loads and 
loads of charges necessitated by the stress of the times. We do not 
say that this is not necessary. We do not even say that the increase 
in the wages of the employees is not necessary. But we do maintain 
that in the present condition of trade and finance that increase will 
be but of little relative benefit and that the burden which it imposes 
upon industry will be of greater proportionate drawback to that 
recovery which must shortly occur, if the middle classes are not to be 
reduced to poverty and distress. 

It is upon that class with fixed incomes that the hardship falls 
with the greatest force and it is cruel to that class. There is no 
other word to meet the situation. And in that class at present reside 
most of the cultural values of our civilization, so that we cannot 
look upon its extinction with anything like equanimity. Many more 
of these additions to the burden of living will, however, indubitably 
destroy it. 



the poorness of the material upon which they relied for their rulers. 
It may also serve as an additional warning if they needed one against 
committing great national interest to imperial families. 



The imperial family is at last beginning to reap in 
The Suicide of its own circle some of the harvest of pain and woe 
Prince Joachim which it brought upon the German people. Prince 

Joachim committed suicide, some say as the result 
of a quarrel with his wife, others because of the intolerable grief 
which the downfall of his country brought upon him. On the other 
hand there are very good grounds for doubting either story. It is 
pretty generally admitted by the friends of the deceased prince that 
he had lately been a heavy drinker and was involved hopelessly in 
debt. It is to these facts rather than to any of the more romantic, 
that we must look for the real reason for his suicidal act. 
- It must be admitted that none of the sons of the Kaiser came 
very well out of the war. The young men whose pictures were so 
conspicuously displayed as gallant young officers during the days of 
peace were not there, so to speak, when the guns began to roar and 
the bravery which was supposed to be inherent in them as members 
of the warlike Hohenzollern family could to put to the test. The 
young man whose untimely death has been recently recorded was 
the only one who was wounded. Others were mentioned in the 
dispatches rather as freebooters and the despoilers of private houses 
than as military men of strength and ability. 

Perhaps the most lamentable thing to the real German, the man 
who though misled was ready and able to stake all upon the game 
which he had started, was this failure of the ruling family to play 
its part with valor and distinction. The death of the prince under 
the circumstances can only serve to show to the Germans as a whole 



The recent agreement between the Hamburg- 
Reopening of American Steamship company and the American 
German Trade Ship and Commerce corporation is another step in 
solving the mass of confusion and peril which has 
supervened upon the refusal of the United States to take part in the 
international settlement of questions which arose out of the war. It 
will give the Germans a chance to get that touch with the outside 
world which is necessary not only to their well-being alone, but to 
that of all other nations. 

The rapid assimilation of German commerce, such as it is, is 
required by all the exigencies of the case. According to the terms 
of agreement as published, the former German trade routes are now 
to be opened to American shipping. This looks well on paper but 
how as a matter of fact are the Germans to furnish the 50 per cent 
of the shipping that the agreement requires? 

We know that they are deficient in ships, as they have had to pay 
the penalty of their mad adventure by the surrender of the greater 
part of their splendid merchant marine to the victorious allies. And 
how are they to acquire the ships which they will need? The papers 
says that the Hamburg-American Line is to undertake a great enter- 
prise of shipbuilding and that the plans are already made for the 
creation of a great and indeed gigantic shipbuilding plant. 

These stories should be received with great caution. For we 
know that the Germans are without the necessary steel and that 
they have not the material of other sorts required for the purposes 
of ship-building. Neither is their labor force well organized for the 
carrying out of any grandiose schemes of immediate rehabilitation 
of their merchant marine. 

These facts are practically admitted in the statement that the 
German shipbuilders will find it more easy to buy the steel for recon- 
struction purposes in the United States, where it can be made more 
cheaply than at home. Herein, after all. is the great advantage to 
us of this new agreement. A new market for our steel products will 
be welcomed. But again how are the Germans to pay at the present 
rate of exchange? They will have to be aided, and it is to be 
presumed that arrangements have been made to that end. 

We can see at a glance, by all this, a portion of the misery which 
I he wicked German adventure has caused its own people. A nation 
that at one time contested the carrying trade of the world on 
favorable terms with its most conspicuous rival, is now vainly 
hunting to get even a 50 per cent interest in its own routes and is 
unable to furnish the necessary ships and material. 

In the meantime, as we have already pointed out, we welcome the 
gain to our own country. 



TO E. T. 

By Robert Frost 

1 slumbered with your poems on my breast 
Spread open as I dropt them half read 

through. 
Like dove wings on a figure on a tomb 
To sec if, in a dream, they brought of you. 

I might not have the chance I missed in life 
Through some delay, and call you to your 

face 
First soldier, and then poet, and then both. 
Who died a soldier-poet of your race. 

I meant, you meant, that nothing should 
remain 



Unsaid between us, brother, and this re- 
mained — 

And one thing more thai was not then to 
say; 

The Victory for what it lost and gained. 

You went to meet the shell's embrace of fire 
On Vimy Ridge ; and when you fell that day 
The war seemed over more for you than me. 
But now for me than you — the other way. 

How over. tho. for even me who knew 
The foe thrust back unsafe beyond the 

Rhine. 
If I was not to speak of it to you 
And see you pleased once more with words 

of mine? 

— Literary Digest. 



The time to buy a used car is just before 
you move, so people in the new neighbor- 
hood will think you were the one who 
used il. — Kansas City Star. 



It begins to look as though it will soon be 
easier to go out and earn a dollar than to 
borrow one. — Rochester Herald. 



A friend who is not in need is a friend in- 
deed. — Answers. 



Doctor — "You have been at death's door, 
and only your strong constitution has saved 
you." 

Patient — "Remember that when you send 
in your bill." — Klods Hans (Copenhagen). 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 24. 1920 



Town Crier 

Hear the Crier: Who the Devil Art Thou? 

One Thai Will Play the Devil, Sir. With You. 

The Pacific Coast has been a great consumer of Eastern 

products; whether the millinery and ball dresses of the gentler 
sex or the bacon and other hog products of the Middle West, the 
shoes of New England or the beverages of Kentucky, bull teams and, 
later, railroads have brought all these for our consumption. Manu- 
factured articles of all kinds and descriptions are exchanged for gold 
and the products of agriculture. Too often the quality has not kept 
pace with Erstern standards and the extreme confines of civilization 
have had to take the leavings and culls of the East. As far as 
fashions and more or less rusty bacon are concerned, the Coast 
can stand it until she creates her own styles and raises her own 
pigs, but in manufactured articles, more especially for constructive 
purposes, the line should be sharply drawn. When certain articles 
are condemned by eastern survey boards and bureaus there is a 
disposition to unload such unsalable stuff on newer and greener 
localities. It is odd that the leading firms should be guilty of 
handling such goods; for their own benefit they should expose and 
placard firms known to deal in and supply other than standard 
articles, even where the customer demands them. 



When the accomplished editor of an evening contemporary 

settles himself upon his tripod and proceeds to argue learnedly in 
defense of a socialistic form of government, big chunks of wisdom 
fall down and around like the precipitation of giant hailstones 
before a Kansas cyclone. That these accretions of a congealed 
intellect should occasionally hit one of the best paying advertisers, 
compelling explanation and an attempt to crawfish, is not strange, 
nor does it excite surprise that these attempts to square things for 
the business manager should be prepared and discharged with 
reckless disregard of both logic and consequences. For instance I 
am of the opinion that no one will attempt to dim the resplendency 
and truth of the following apothegm: "A socialistic form of 
government is not as good as a democratic form of government, but 
a good socialistic form of government is better than a poor 
democracy." A rotten egg is not so good as a good egg, but a good 
rotten egg is better than a bad good egg. Personally this editor is 
no doubt a very excellent and worthy person but as an expounder 
and champion of socialism he is vulnerable to grave objection. 



Although the Hon. James Hamilton Lewis did manage a 

couple of times to have his picture projected newspaperward during 
his attendance upon the recent Democratic convention at San 
Francisco, and his poise, apparel and whiskers were as faultless as in 
days of yore, the gentleman failed to radiate intelligence with that 
degree of fierce intensity which usually serves to distinguish his 
mental brilliancy from the phosphorescent gleam of a dead mackerel. 
This is regretted by his friends, of whom I have the happiness to 
count myself one of thirty years' standing. I have observed a 
tendency in certain quarters to speak of the Senator's political work 
with levity. There are some pretty wide spaces in Senator Lewis' 
intellectual domain which many professors of the cultivated sneer 
might explore with profit. In welcoming him to permanent retire- 
ment the News Letter wishes him a continuance of that admiration 
and success which is sure to follow a course prompted by gentle- 
manly instincts and modesty of purpose. 



For Oakland and the row of cities bordering the eastern 

shore of the bay there appears no relief in this generation from 
the inadequate water supply that threatens the health of the people 
and the very existence of those municipalities. With a sufficient 
field of operation the tactics of the San Francisco corporation are 
being adopted in the shutting out of competitors; in stingy extension 
of insufficient mains; in an utter indifference to the demands of the 
public other than necessary supply for domestic consumption, and 
even that uncertain in "dry years;" in an attitude of defiance 
toward municipal requirements and a sinking of all but the utmost 
selfish motives in all its transactions. This picture will do for either 
of the water companies and everyone who reads the history or looks 
into the motives of one may well apply that knowledge to the other. 
Both are potent factors in politics and all that goes to pull the strings 
that occasion delay in all matters that do not suit their purpose. 
The existence of these great monopolies, beneficial only so far as 
suits their selfish ends, is a curse which hangs over both com- 
munities. 



Usually when the Examiner states anything as a fact, Heaven 

inspires me with a credulity invincible alike to the sophistries of' 
reason and the falsehoods of truth. But in so persistently indulging 
in its favorite and revered argument that the Japs will ultimately 
dominate the population of California and annihilate its property 
values he instills within me a secret opinion that it is not in this 
affair giving young America a fair deal. It is admitted that Mr. 
Hearst is driven by the hardest and most imperious necessity to wage 
war against Japan. If he didn't he would be sick. I do not care 
to argue this matter with my contemporary. I should not care to 
rob such a one of whatever joy his life is suffused with from thinking 
as he does. But if on reflection (and after prayer) he should be 
convinced that the situation is really not quite so serious as set forth 
in his newspaper, I hope he will have the self-denial to tone down 
such reports, henceforth, before admitting them to his columns. 



It equips me with a new and improved respect for human 

nature to note that some men preserve their tranquility, reason and 
moderation even under the most distracting afflictions of others. 
A striking instance of this kind of self-containment is exemplified 
by the manner in which Judge Louis H. Ward received the 
information that a woman being tried in his court for embezzlement 
had escaped court punishment by marrying the complaining witness 
whom she was alleged to have swindled. Instead of giving way to 
emotions natural under the circumstance, he merely inquired if the 
man was crazy, made the announcement that he positively declined 
to hear the divorce proceedings in his court, and calmly dismissed 
the case. 



It is almost an invariable rule with San Francisco journals 

never to mention the name of a rival publication. Probably nothing 
less than some great convulsion of nature will ever shake out of the 
average editor's head the astounding belief that mention of another 
local journal will powerfully propel its fortunes in the direction of 
prosperity. This style of writer may hate a rival to the full force of 
a malignant nature, but the fear of unduly advertising an adversary 
stays the puny engine of his wrath. Between his natural desire to 
wordily assault his unworthy contemporary and the paralyzing 
conviction that this action will advance the villain's interests, his 
mental condition is most unenviable. 



The candidate which the third party may put up needs only 

two planks in his platform (or so it seems to me) to go in with flying 
colors — a wet one, and a green one. 



That part of the peace treaty between Germany and the 

Allies which prohibits the latter country from manufacturing arma- 
ment of any sort, appeals to me as being good sound "horse sense," 
a quality in international law which has not been in much evidence 
throughout the world during the last few years. 



July 24, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



The Vengeance of a Tree 

By Eleanore F. Lewys-Ross. 



[Editor's Note: The News Letter will publish each week during the next 
few months, a series of short stories written by Eleanore F. Lewys-Ross. The 
following story was first published in this paper many years ago, and re- 
published in a volume brought out by Ogilvie & Co-, entitled "Twenty-Five 
Ghost Stories," among which appeared tales from the pens of Edgar Allen Poe, 
Guy de Maupassant, and other famous authors.] 



Through the windows of Jim Daly's saloon, in the little town of 

C , the setting sun streamed in yellow patches, lighting up the 

glasses scattered on the tables and the faces of several men who 
were gathered near the bar. Farmers mostly they were, with a 
sprinkling of shopkeepers, while prominent among them was the 
village editor, and all were discussing a startling piece of news that 
had spread through the town and its surroundings. The tidings that 
Walter Stedman, a laborer on Albert Kelsey's ranch, had murdered 
his employer's daughter, had reached them, and had spread universal 
horror among the people. 

A farmer declared that he had seen the deed committed as he 
walked through a neighboring lane, and, having always been noted 
for his cowardice, instead of running to the girl's aid, had hailed a 
party of miners who were returning from their mid-day meal through 
a field near by. When they reached the spot, however, where 
Stedman (as they supposed) had done his black deed, only the girl 
lay there, in the stillness of death. Her murderer had taken the 
opportunity to fly. The party had searched the woods of the Kelsey 
estate, and just as they were nearing the house itself the appearance 
of Walter Stedman, walking in a strangely unsteady manner toward 
it, made them quicken their pace. 

He was soon in custody, although he had protested his innocence 
of the crime. He said that he had just seen the body himself on 
his way to the station, and that when they had found him he was 
going to the house for help. But they had laughed at his story, and 
had flung him into the tiny, stifling calaboose of the town. 

What were their proofs? Walter Stedman. a young fellow of 
about twenty-six. had come from the city to their quiet town, just 
when times were at their hardest, in search of work. The most of 
the men living in the town were honest fellows, doing their work 
faithfully, when they could get it. and when they had socially asked 
Stedman to have a drink with them, he had refused in rather a 
scornful manner. "That infernal city chap." he was called, and 
their hate and envy increased in strength when Albert Kelsey had 
employed him in preference to any of themselves. As time went on. 
the story of Stedman's admiration for Margaret Kelsey had gone 
afloat, with the added information that his employer's daughter had 
repulsed him. saying that she wculd not marry a common laborer. 
So Stedman. when this news reached his employer's ear- 
discharged, and this. then, was his revenge! For them, these proofs 
were sufficient to pronounce him guilty. 

Yet that afternoon, as Stedman. crouched on the floor of the 
calaboose, grew hopeless in the knowledge that no one would believe 
his story, and that his undeserved punishment would br swift and 
sure, a tramp, boarding a freight car several miles from the town, 
sped away from the spot where his crime had been committed, and 
knew that forever its shadow would follow him. 

From the tiny window of his prison Walter Stedman could see the 
red glow of the heavens that betokened the setting of the sun. So 
the red sun of his life was soon to set. a life that had been innocent 
of all crime, and that now was to be ended for a deed that he had 
never committed. Most prominent of all the visions that swept 
through his mind was that of Margaret Kelsey. lying as he had first 
found her. fresh from the hands of her murderer. But there was 



another of a more tender nature. How long he and Margaret had 
tried to keep their secret, until Walter could be promoted to a higher 
position, so that he could ask for her hand with no fear of the 
father's antagonism! Then came the remembrance of an afternoon 
meeting between the two in the woods of the Kelsey estate — how, 
just as they were parting, Walter had heard footsteps near them, 
and, glancing sharply around, saw an evil, scowling, murderous face 
peering through the brush. He had started toward it, but the 
owner of the countenance had taken himself hurriedly off. 

The gossiping townspeople had misconstrued this romance, and 
when Albert Kelsey had heard of this clandestine meeting from the 
man who was later on to appear as a leader of the mob, and that 
he had discharged Stedman, they had believed that the young man 
had formally proposed and had been rejected. But justice had 
gone wrong, as it had done innumerable times before, and will again. 
An innocent man was to be hanged, even without the comfort of a 
trial, while the man who was guilty was free to wander where he 
would. 

That autumn night the darkness came quickly, and only the 
stars did their best to light the scene. A body of men, all masked, 
and having as a leader one who had ever since Stedman's arrival in 
town, cherished a secret hatred of the young man, dragged Stedman 
from the calaboose and tramped through the town, defying all, 
defying even God himself. Along the highway, and into Farmer 
Brown's "cross-cut," they went, vigilantly guarding their prisoner, 
who, with the lanterns lighting up his haggard face, walked among 
them with the lagging step of utter hopelessness. 

"That's a good tree," their leader said, presently, stopping and 
pointing out a spreading oak; when the slipknot was adjusted and 
Stedman had stepped on the box, he added: "If you've got any- 
thing to say, you'd better say it now." 

"I am innocent, I swear before God," the doomed man answered; 
"I never took the life of Margaret Kelsey." 

"Give us your proof," jeered the leader, and when Stedman kept a 
despairing silence, he laughed shortly. 

"Ready, men!" he gave the order. The box was kicked aside, 
and then — only a writhing body swung to and fro in the gloom. 

In front of the men stood their leader, watching the contortions 
of the body with silent glee. "I'll tell you a secret, boys," he said, 

suddenly. "I was after that poor murdered girl myself. A d 

little chance I had; but. by . he had just as little!" 

A nause — then: "He's shunted this earth. Cut him down, you 
fellows!" 

• •9*9* 

"It's no use. son. I'll give up the blasted thing as a bad job. 
There's something queer about that there tree. Do you see how its 
branches balance it? We have cut the trunk nearly in two, but it 
won't come down. There's plenty of others around; we'll take one 
of them. If I'd a long rope with me. I'd get that tree down, and 
yet the way the thing stands, it would be risking a fellow's life to 
climb it. It's got the devil in it, sure." 

So old Farmer Brown shouldered his axe. and made for another 
tree, his son following. They had sawed and chopped and chopped 
and sawed, and yet the tall white oak. with its branches jutting out 
almost as regularly as if done by the work of a machine, stood 
straight and firm. 

Farmer Brown, well known for his weak, cowardly spirit, who in 
beholding the murder of Albert Kelsey's daughter, had in his fright 
mistaken the criminal, now in his superstition let the oak stand. 
• its well-balanced position saved it from falling, when other 
trees would have been down. And so this tree, the same one to 
which an innocent man had been hanged, was left for other work. 

It was a bleak, rainy night — such a night as can be found only in 
Central California. The wind howled like a thousand demons, and 
I,- shed the trees together in wild embraces. Now and then the weird 

(Continued to Page 1 1 ) 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 24, 1920 



Gossip of Society 



At a simple wedding performed July 19 at 
noon at the Keeler home in San Rafael, Miss 
Alice Keeler became the bride of Rev. Henry 
Ohlthoff of New York. The marriage cere- 
mony was read on the veranda of the Keeler 
home, in a veritable bower of summer 
blooms. Hydrangeas, gladioli and potted 
ferns were used in the decorations. Mrs. 
Ohlthoff is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Addison Starr Keeler, and has been prom- 
inently identified with the social activities 
of San Francisco and Marin county since she 
made her debut in 1916. Rev. Henry 
Ohlthoff is a graduate of St. Stephen's and 
the Berkeley divinity colleges in Connec- 
ticut and at present is chaplain of St. Luke's 
hospital and in charge of the Canon Kip 
Memorial Home. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Leroy Nickel have re- 
turned from a motor trip through the State. 

Miss Edna Taylor had as her week-end 
guest at her home in Menlo Miss Jean 
Howard, who has recently returned from 
Honolulu. 

Baron and Baroness Alfred de Ropp of 
Los Angeles are in Santa Barbara as the 
house guests of the latter's brother-in-law 
and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Howard 
Webb. 

Mrs. Hypolite Dutard and Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward Houghton of San Francisco are 
house guests of Mr. and Mrs. E. Avery 
McCarthy of Los Angeles. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hooker of San 
Mateo are entertaining as their house guest 
Joseph Larocque, Jr., of New York, who 
came West with Robert Hooker, Jr., for the 
summer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Nearney are making 
their home at the Richelieu hotel. Mr. and 
Mrs. Nearney and their son, Houghson, have 
recently returned from a motor trip to Los 
Angeles. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hill Vincent have 
returned to Burlingame after having passed 
the week-end at Del Monte. 

Richard McCreery and little Isabel Mc- 
Creery spent the week-end at Feather River 
Inn. 

Mrs. James McNab, who is at San Ysidro, 
was joined last week by her sister. Miss Ger- 
trude Kennedy. 

Edward Saunders of Santa Barbara has 
come north to attend High Jinks at Bo- 
hemian Grove. 

Mrs. William Mayo Newall, Jr., and Miss 
Elizabeth Adams have returned from a visit 
to Del Monte. 

Commander William C. Van Antwerp was 
host at a dinner Friday evening, July 16, at 
the Burlingame Country club in compliment 



to Mrs. Heber Reginald Bishop who is 
visiting here from her home in New York. 
The entire color scheme was carried out in 
jade green. Those invited to meet the 
charming guest of honor included: Messrs. 
and Mesdames William H. Crocker, Henry T. 
Scott, Frederick Hussey, Samuel Knight, 
William Devereux, Thomas Eastland, Eugene 
JVlurphy, Walter Martin, Mrs. Nion Tucker; 
Misses Edith Chesebrough, Helen Chese- 
brough; Messrs. William W. Crocker, Stan- 
ford Gwin, Count Andre de Limur, Francis 
Carolan, Stuart Lowery. Following the 
dinner Commander Van Antwerp was host 
at a supper dance at the club. 

One of the many parties motoring to 
Feather River Inn last week included Mrs. 
Malcolm Whitman and her niece, Miss Bar- 
bara Harrison, the daughter of Governor 
Francis Burton Harrison of the Philippines, 
and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Templeton 
Crocker. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Wallace Mein and 
their children arrived last month from New 
York to open their summer home at Tahoe. 
Since their arrival in California, Mr. and 
Mrs. Mein have been entertaining parties 
of relatives and friends at their attractive 
place. 

On Friday, July 16, Mrs. Hoyt Perry en- 
tertained informally at luncheon at the Bel- 
vedere Country club preceding an afternoon 
of golf. Her guests on that occasion were 
Mrs. Pinckard and Mrs. Ralston Page, who, 
with Mr. Page, is a guest of her mother, Mrs. 
Arthur Page, for a few days in Belvedere. 

Last week Mr. and Mrs. Talbot Walker 
gave a delightful dinner dance at their 
southern home, the "Gables," in Montecito. 
Those asked to meet Mrs. Fred Sharon and 
Mrs. James Haggin were: Messrs. and 
Mesdames Joseph Griswold Coleman, Joel 
Remington Fithian, J. Waldron Gillespie, 
John Percival Jefferson. 

Mr. and Mrs. George A. Pope, George 
Pope, Jr.. Mrs. Eugene Murphy, Kenneth 
Pope and Gordon Hitchcock made up a 
party who motored to Feather River Inn. 

Dr. Thomas A. Le Breton, ambassador to 
the United States from Argentina, and Senor 
and Madame D. Mathieu, the former of 
whom is the Chilean ambassador to this 
country, have all joined the summer colony 
in the south and are at El Mirasol. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alan Cline, who are now in 
San Diego, stopped for a short visit with their 
cousin, Mrs. Edward Gould, at Montecito. 

Mr. and Mrs. Monroe Eyre Pinckard with 
Miss Dorothy and Eyre Pinchard, Jr., left 
last week for Tahoe to visit for a fortnight 
at the William Wallace Mein home. 



Mrs. James Hall Bihsop, Miss Isabelle 
Bishop and James Hall Bishop, Jr., have 
gone to Lake Tahoe, where they will be 
guests at the Tavern for the coming few 
weeks. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robinson Riley and their 
daughter are passing the summer with Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Kenneth Mcintosh, Miss 
Aileen Mcintosh and Kenneth Mcintosh. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Monroe Pinckard, 
who are passing the summer months at the 
Pinckard home in San Rafael, entertained 
Mr. and Mrs. Hoyt Jerry as their week-end 
guests. 

Mrs. Alexander Heyneman, with her son 
and daughter, Lloyd and Rosalie Howard, 
are at the Ambassador in Santa Barbara. 

Mrs. George T. Marye left California July 
14 for New York and Washington, D. C. In 
Washington she will be joined by her 
daughter. Miss Helen Marye. 

As a benefit for the Protestant Episcopal 
Old Ladies' Home, on Golden Gate avenue, 
Mrs. A. B. Hammond opened her beautiful 
home on Broadway July 15 for a bridge 
party and tea. Among those who enter- 
tained guests were: Mesdames James Potter 
Langhorne, James Kendall Armsby, William 
Fitzhugh, J. R. K. Nuttall, James Ruggles, 
Charles Warren Clark, Bronte Aikin, J. B. 
McDonald. Cline Bull, Seward McNear, 
Warren Clark, Sidney Van Wyck, George 
Kleiser, John Harold Phillips, A. F. Baldwin, 
D. M. Dunn, John M. Graham; Miss Sally 
Maynard. 

The bridge party and tea which Mrs. 
Richard Derby and her daughter, Mrs. Henry 
T. Burgin, gave at the quarters in Fort 
Mason of Colonel Richard Derby was one of 
the largest recent affairs. It was in honor 
of Mrs. C. C. Ross, the daughter of Mrs. 
Leila B. Stoddard. 

Mrs. James Ward Keeney and Mrs. 
George Harding of Philadelphia, Pa., are 
house guests of Mr. and Mrs. Talbot Walker 
in Santa Barbara. Mrs. Harding is planning 
to return to her home in Philadelphia in 
September and will be accompanied East by 
Mrs. Keeney, who will probably remain there 
for the winter. 

Mrs. Edwin L. Griffith presided over a 
tea July 15 at her home in Ross Valley, in 
honor of Mrs. E. Coppee Thurston, who is 
visiting here from New York. 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Baker, with their 
children, left July 14 for Lenox, Mass., 
where they will pass the remainder of the 
summer. They will return to California in 
October. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Irwin will pass the 
next few months in Sausalito, where they 
have taken a house. 

Miss Francis Pringle entertained a num- 
ber of her girl friends, members of the sub- 
debutante set, at a delightfully informal 
luncheon recently at her parents' home in 
Menlo Park. The affair was in honor of 



July 24, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Miss Jeanette Riley, the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Robinson Riley. 

Mrs. Halsey Manwaring, the wife of H. E. 
Manwaring, manager of the Palace hotel, 
is at the Arlington for a visit. 

Mrs. Pio Morbio, accompanied by her 
daughter, the Countess de Mailly Chalon, is 
at the Arlington hotel in Santa Barbara. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Walter (Betty 
Devereaux), who were married in this city 
a short time ago, are motoring through Cali- 
fornia. 

Mrs. Thomas Dibblee gave a delightful tea 
on Saturday afternoon in honor of her son 
and daughter-in-law, who are in Santa Bar- 
bara for the summer. 

Mrs. Cosmo Morgan of Los Angeles is in 
town visiting her son, Cosmo Morgan, Jr., 
at the Hotel Cecil for a few weeks. 

Mrs. Frederick W. Sharon and her cousin, 
Mrs. James Haggin of New York, who 
motored south together, have been extens- 
ively entertained since their arrival in Santa 
Barbara. 

Jack Breeden, who is summering in the 
south with his mother, Mrs. Butler Breeden, 
was host at a delightful dinner dance which 
he gave on Saturday evening at the Santa 
Barbara Country club, when he entertained 
a number of his young friends. 

One of the most delightful affairs of the 
week-end enjoyed by the younger set of 
society, was the supper dance which Richard 
Tobin gave on Saturday evening at the San 
Mateo Polo club in honor of his two attract- 
ice nieces, Miss Madeline and Miss Elizabeth 
Raoul-Duval, the daughters of Captain and 
Mrs. Charles Raoul-Duval. Mrs. Raoul- 
Duval and her daughters will leave on the 
29th for New York, and will sail August 4 
on the S. S. Olympic for France, where they 
will join Captain Raoul-Duval in Paris. They 
will take an apartment in Paris, where they 
plan to remain for a year. 

Oliver Harriman arrived from the East 
last week and has joined Mrs. Harriman and 
their two sons. Mrs. Irene Hopper of New 
York and Miss Mary Condon of Memphis. 
Tenn., are the guests of the Harrimans. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick MacMonies. who 
have been in Los Angeles all spring as the 
guests of Mrs. John P. Jones, arrived in New 
York recently and within a few days sailed 
for France. 

Mrs. Clinton Walker and her son. Brooks 
Walker, are motoring south to Santa 
Barbara. 

AT CASA DEL REY 

Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Jeffery and their 
daughter, Miss Muriel, have just completed 
an extensive motor trip through the State, 
stopping at Lake Tahoe, Yosemite, Del 
Monte. Los Angeles and other places of in- 
terest. Mr. Jeffery has gone east on busi- 
ness, leaving his family at the Casa del Rey 
for the remainder of the summer. They 
make their home at the Stewart, when in the 



city. Miss Jeffery, a very attracive young 
lady, is planning to take a course at the 
University of California this fall, specializing 
in agriculture. 

Mr. and Mrs. William E. Sharon, Hurford 
Sharon and Miss Narcissa Carini, of Pied- 
mont, who are also making quite a sojourn 
via automobile, stopped at the Casa del Rey 
for a few days. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry A. Goedje took a 
party of friends to the Big Basin and other 
scenic points of interest. The group in- 
cluded Miss Ruth Collier, Mrs. B. Bayse and 
Miss C. M. Goedje. The Goedjes, who have 
been spending several weeks at the hotel, are 
returning to their home in San Francisco 
shortly. 

Judge F. A. Griffin, accompanied by his 
wife and daughter, are guests at the Casa del 
Rey, where they will remain for a month or 
more. With them are Mrs. Cora Jacobs and 
Miss Eleanor Jacobs. 

Another interesting family group is that 
of Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Eisert with their son 
Richard and Mr. and Mrs. G. J. Eisert of 
San Francisco. Miss Katherine Gressler is 
accompanying them. The entire party spend 
the greater part of the time on the golf 
links, over which they are very enthusiastic. 
Mrs. J. A. Williams is also with them and her 
small daughter, Miss Franc Pixley Williams, 
a namesake of the late Frank Pixley, well 
known writer of poetry and lyrics for many 
a successful light opera, one of which is 
"The Prince of Pilsen," at present being re- 
vived by the new Bostonians. 

Mrs. Ralph McLaren, wile of Supervisor 
McLaren, is a guest of the Casa del Rey, 
where she will remain several days, and is 
having her mother, Mrs. F. D'Arcy Brown, 
with her. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce H. McBirney, who 
were married recently at St. Dominic's 
church, with quite an elaborate wedding, 
stopped at the Casa del Rey on their honey- 
moon. Mrs. McBirney was Miss Genevieve 
Leonard, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Alexan- 
der T. Leonard, well known in San Fran- 
cisco society. 

Another of the many bridal couples stay- 
ing at the Casa del Rey just now is Dr. and 
Mrs. Gottlieb, who both have a host of 
friends in San Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Chickering of Pied- 
mont were also guests of the hotel for a few 
days, accompanied by Mrs. Allen L. 
Chickering. 



GRADUATE OF MARINE CORPS 
INSTITUTE 

To North Carolina, the home state of Sec- 
itlniv Daniels, goes the honor of claiming 
the first graduate of the Marine Corps Insti- 
tute, the scat of the vocational schools es- 
tablished by Major General John A. 
Lejeune at Quantico. Va.. along the exact 
lines followed so successfully by the Scranton 



International Schools of Correspondence. 

Corporal W. C. Erwin of Durham, N. C, 
a veteran of the Fifth Marines who fought in 
every engagement of the famous Second Di- 
vision of which General Lejeune was the 
commander, is the graduate. Erwin listed to 
the slogan "Back to the Farm" and is now 
an instructor in the livestock course in which 
he graduated with a final average of 98 per 
cent. In recognition of his achievement 
Erwin is the proud possessor of an auto- 
graphed letter from Secretary Daniels. 



A POPULAR PLACE TO DINE 

The Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room that is 
becoming one of the most talked of luncheon 
rooms in the city on account of its oriental 
beauty and unique atmosphere, is the scene 
of many interesting parties almost every day. 
During the week many prominent people 
have been giving luncheon parties, among 
them being Louise Dresser, appearing this 
week at the Orpheum, and her partner, Jack 
Gardiner. 

Other parties have been given by Mrs. 
Fred Sherman, Mrs. Reginald Dexter Knight, 
Mrs. E. T. Heald, and Mrs. Manheim of 
Piedmont, who gave a luncheon in honor of 
her sister, Mrs. Albert Elkus, who is visiting 
here from Sacramento. 

On Friday evening a midnight party will 
be given by Miss Hattie Mooser for Miss 
Dresser at which will gather many notables 
of the theatrical, artistic and literary 
world. 



"Three balls!" yelled the umpire. 

"Now's your chance to soak it," shouted 
the excited pawnbroker's clerk to the bats- 
man. — Boston Transcript. 











W Ward's 

is not 

A High Price Store 

IT has the unique 
distinction of being 
exclusive, but not 
expensive. 

139-153 Geary Street 

San Francisco 










DR. WM. W. HOAGLAND 

DENTIST 
PCftrgCr 38BVICI IXSURC3 batwfactios 

Offices. 908 Market St., Third Floor 
TELEPHONE GARFIELD 835 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 24. 1920 



Capital and Labor 



"The workman," says Otto H. Kahn, "is 
neither a machine nor a commodity. He is a 
collaborator with capital." 

"The principle on which all concerned 
should deal with the labor question appears 
to me plain. It is the principle of the Golden 
Rule," declares Otto H. Kahn in his new 
book "Our Economic and Other Problems" 
(Doran). With the keen analysis of the 
trained financier and the skilled economist, 
he pitilessly exposes the great existing evils 
of our economic system. But he does more 
than this — he suggests their remedy in a 
constructive and clearly denned program. 

An expert of international repute — an 
economist called into conference by the lead- 
ing personages of Europe and America in 
times of financial crises — Mr. Kahn speaks 
with the authority that is based on broad 
practical experience. Not only is he specially 
equipped, both by training and experience, 
to give illuminating inside facts on the status 
of capital and labor and their relation to 
each other, but also to analyze the funda- 
mental causes of poverty which lie at the 
root of our economic system and to propose 
a constructive program. 

Mr. Kahn speaks in no equivocal terms of 
the relation between capital and labor. "I 
think," he says frankly, "the formula should 
be that, first, labor is entitled to a living 
wage; after that capital is entitled to a living 
wage; what is left over belongs to both 
capital and labor, in such proportions as 
fairness and equity and reason shall de- 
termine in all cases." 

An interesting angle on the intimate con- 
nection between capital and labor is the 
statement that "there are so many different 
kinds of labor; there are so many different 
kinds of capital. Not infrequently the 
laborer and capitalist overlap and merge into 
one. You have skilled labor and unskilled 
labor; you have the small employer, the 
large individual employer, the corporate 
employer, the farmer, the inventor, the pros- 
pector, etc. And then circumstances and 
conditions vary greatly, of course, in dif- 
ferent parts of the country and in different 
industries." 

"It is impossible to measure by the same 
yard-stick everywhere, but the principle of 
fairness can be stated; the desire can be 
stated lo do everything possible to bring 
about good feeling and good understanding 
between labor and capital, and willingly and 
freely to co-operate so that labor shall re- 
ceive its fair share in the fruits of industry, 
not only by way of a wage return, but of an 
adequate return also in those less tangible 
things which make for contentment and 
happiness." 



Mr. Kahn then outlines what he believes 
are the essential points on capital and labor 
to be followed by right thinking men. 

"The workman is neither a machine nor 
a commodity. He is a collaborator with 
capital. He must be given an effective 
voice in determining jointly with the em- 
ployer the conditions under which he works. 
Individual capacity, industry and ambition 
must receive encouragement and recognition. 
Nor must the employer look for 'gratitude.' 
No man is entitled to ask gratitude for doing 
that which is right. The closest possible con- 
tact must be maintained between employer 
and employee. Arrangements for the adjust- 
ment of grievances must be provided." 

"The worker's living conditions must be 
made dignified and attractive to himself and 
his family. 

"Nothing is of greater importance. To 
the extent that the employer is unable to 
provide such homes, it becomes the duty of 
the State or the community. 

"The worker must be relieved of the dread 
of sickness, unemployment, and old age. 
The community must find ways and means 
of seeing to it that any man fit and honestly 
desirous to do an honest day's work shall 
have an opportunity to earn a living." 

"The worker must receive a wage which 
not only permits him to keep body and soul 
together, but to take proper care of his wife 
and children, to have for himself and for 
them a share of the comforts, interests and 
recreations of life." 

Mr. Kahn then goes on to analyze the 
cause of poverty. "Labor must realize that 
high wages can only be maintained if high 
production is maintained. The primary 
cause of poverty is underproduction. Fur- 
thermore, lessened production naturally 



makes for high costs. High wages accom- 
panied by proportionately high cost of the 
essentials of living do the worker no good. 
And they do the rest of the community a 
great deal of harm. The welfare of the so- 
called middle-class, i. e., the men and women 
living on moderate incomes, the small shop- 
keeper, the average professional man, the 
farmer, etc., is just as important to the com- 
munity as the welfare of the wage-earner. 
If through undue exactions, through unfair 
use of his power, through inadequate output 
the workman brings about a condition in 
which the pressure of high prices become in- 
tolerable to the middle classes, he will create 
a class animosity against himself which is 
bound to be of infinite harm to his legitimate 
aspirations. Precisely the same, of course, 
holds true of capital." 



ENGLISH LABOR'S ATTITUDE 

The Labor Party, which was so seriously 
divided during the war, is closing its ranks, 
and the discussions on foreign policy at the 
Scarborough conference this week are re- 
vealing a common outlook on the part of the 
Socialist and trade-union wings. The atti- 
tude of the British movement toward Bol- 
shevism will not be finally determined until 
the Trade Unions Congress in September, 
but after Mr. Tom Shaw's moving account 
of his visit to Russia, there was no doubt of 
the unanimous hostility to the blockade, and 
to any sort of support of Polish aggression. 
On Ireland the party is indeterminate. The 
president, Mr. Hutchinson, urged in his ad- 
dress that Ireland should have full and com- 
plete choice of government — he would not 
deny her right to choose a republic — but the 
deputation from the Parliamentary Labor 
party after their recent Irish tour, stopped 
short at the point of granting independence. 
— Manchester Guardian. 



The dry decision was handed down by a 
"full" court. 



NEW LOCATION 

Of the Old-Established Firm of 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Cosgrove announce the 
opening of their new hair store, beautifully 
fitted and equipped with every modern 
convenience and facility for perfect service, at 

360 Geary Street 

Next to St. Francis Hotel 



July 24. 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 



A Victory Dance 



The cymbals crash, 

And the dancers walk 
With long silk stockings 

And arms of chalk, 
Butterfly skirts. 

And white breasts bare, 
And shadows of dead men 

Watching 'em there. 

Shadows of dead men 

Stand by the wall, 
Watching the fun 

Of the Victory Ball. 
They do not reproach, 

Because they know, 
If they're forgotten, 

It's better so. 

Under the dancing 

Feet are the graves. 
Dazzle and motley. 

In long bright waves. 
Blushed by the palm fronds. 

Grapple and whirl 
Ox-eyed matron 

And slim white girl. 

Fat wet bodies 

Go waddling by. 
Girded with satin. 

Though God knows why; 
Gripped by satyrs 

In white and black. 
With a fat wet hand 

On a fat wet back. 

See, there is one child 

Fresh from school. 
Learning the ropes 

As the old hands rule. 



God, how that dead boy 

Gapes and grins 
As the tom-toms bang 

And the shimmy begins! 

"What did you think 

We should find," said a shade, 
"When the last shot echoed 

And peace was made?" 
"Christ," laughed the fleshless 

Jaws of his friend; 
"I thought they'd be praying 

For worlds to mend; 

"Making earth better, 

Or something silly. 
Like whitewashing hell 

Or Picca-dam-dilly. 
They've a sense of humor. 

These women of ours. 
These exquisite lilies. 

These fresh young flowers!" 

"Pish," said a statesman. 

Standing near, 
"I'm glad they can busy 

Their thoughts elsewhere! 
We mustn't reproach 'em. 

They'e young, you see." 
"Ah," said the dead men. 

"So were we!" 

Victory! Victory! 

On with the dance! 
Back to the jungle 

The new beasts prance! 
God, how the dead men 

Grin by the wall. 
Watching the fun 

Of the Victory Ball! 

By Alfred Noves, in Satin. lay Evening Post. 



GALA DAY IN OAKLAND FOR 
MOVIE STARS 

Motion picture fans of Northern Califor- 
nia will have an opportunity to see over 
twenty-five of the best known motion picture 
stars in action Monday, July 26, when Oak- 
land stages First National Field Day. 

Special arrangements are being made to 
accommodate a capacity crowd on the 
streets and at the Oakland baseball park 
where the events will be held. The field day 
will start at 10:30 Monday morning with 
the arrival of the stars in special cars and 
will end with their departure for the South 
at 10:30 in the evening. A banquet to the 
visitors at the Oakland hotel by the business 
men followed by a public reception at the 
1. & D. theatre will close the festivities. 

The program calls for a mammoth parade 
of civic bodies, bands, military and motion 
picture stars; two public receptions, a ball 
game between a team of stars led by Ben 
Turpin and Charlie Murray and the Oakland 
baseball club of the Pacific Coast league, 
field sports and stunts by the stars and an 
aerial battle by Cliff Durant's fleet of air- 
plains. No admission will be charged for 
any of the events excepting the banquet. 

The organizations taking part in the field 
day in addition to the visiting stars are the 
Chamber of Commerce, Business Develop- 
ment League, Mutual Business club. Mer- 
chants Exchange, Elks, K. of C, K. of P., 
Kawanis club and city officials. 

Stars who have pledged their appearance 
are Agnes Ayres, George Beban, Wesley 
Barry, Al Christie, Mildred Harris Chaplin, 
Allan Dawn, Marjorie Daw, Carter DeHaven, 
Phillis Haver, Colleen Moore. Marshall 
Neilan, Charlie Murray. Charles Ray, Mack 
Sennett, Mary Thurman, Fay Tichner, Bobby 
Vernon, King Vidor, Florence Vidor, Ben 
Turpin and Anita Stewart. Clara Kimball 
Young, Annette Kellerman and Charlie 
Chaplin are also expected. 



The Vengeance of a Tree 



(Continued from Page 7) 

"hoot, hoot!" of an owl came softly from the distance in the lulls of 
the storm, while the barking of coyotes woke the echoes of the hills 
into sounds like fiendish laughter. 

In the wind and rain a man fought his path through the bush 
and into Farmer Brown's "cross cut." as the shortest way home. 
Suddenly he stopped, trembling, as if held by some unseen impulse. 
Before him rose the white oak, wavering and swaying in the 
storm. 

"Good God! It's the tree I swung Stedman from!" he cried, and 
a strange fear thrilled him. 

His eyes were fixed on it, held by some undefinable fascination. 
Yes. there on one of the longest branches a small piece of rope 
still dangled. And then, to the murderer's excited vision, this 
rape seemed to lengthen, to form at the end a slipknot, a knot that 
encircled a purple neck, while below it writhed and swayed the body 
ol a man! 



"Damn him!" he muttered, starling toward the hanging form, 
as if about to help the rope in its work of strangulation ; "will he 
forever follow me? And yet he deserved it, the black-hearted 
villain! He took her life " 

He never finished the sentence. The white oak. towering above 
him in its strength, seemed to grow like a frenzied, living creature. 
There was a sudden splitting sound, then came a crash, and under 
the fallen tree lay Stedman's murderer, crushed and mangled. 

From between the broken trunk and the stump that was left, a 
gray, dim shape sprang out. and sped past the man's still form, away 
into the wild blackness of the night. 



A friend of mine originated the clever remark that "there's 

many a slip 'twixt the cup and the Lip-ton." and it was published 
many years ago. in a New York paper. We notice that this bon mot 
h i- been dug up and appeared recently in a San Francisco daily. 
Is it a case of "great minds running in the same channel," or that 
"imitation is the sincerest form of flattery?" 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 24, 1920 



RAPID GAINS IN U. S. TRADE WITH 
THE FAR EAST 

The after-the-war trade of the United 
States with the Far East shows astonishing 
gains. We had been gratified, says a state- 
ment of the National City Bank of New 
York, in the fact that our exports to Asia 
had grown from $113,000,000 in the fiscal 
year immediately preceding the war, 1914, 
to $604,000,000 in the fiscal year which in- 
cluded its close, 1919; but this growth of 
practically $50,000,000 in five years of war 
is followed by a growth of $203,000,000 in 
the first year of peace. Latest figures of our 
exports to Asia as a whole, adds the banks' 
statement, indicate that the total exports to 
that continent in the fiscal year 1920, which 
ended June 30, were $804,000,000 against 
$604,000,000 in the fiscal year 1919. a gain 
of 33 per cent in this first peace year in 
which we were expecting that Asia would re- 
turn to her former habit of buying from 
western Europe. Apparently her habit, de- 
veloped during the war, of trading with the 
United States, her neighbor across the 
Pacific, is continuing and likely to continue, 
for this big gain in the fiscal year in our 
trade with Asia continues right down to the 
present moment, the exports to that conti- 
nent in the month of May, the latest figures 
available, showing an increase of 43 per 
cent over May of last year. While of course 
a part of these increases are due to higher 
valuations, it is quite apparent that there 
has also been a very large increase in quan- 
tities of merchandise moved, both in imports 
and exports. 

This disposition of the Far East to buy 
our manufactures — for more than three- 
fourths of our exports to Asia are manufac- 
tures — is fully reciprocated by the United 
States, which increased its imports from 
Asia 50 per cent during the fiscal year 1920, 
our total imports from that grand division 
in the year ending June 30, 1920, having 
been $1,350,000,000 against $831,000,000 
in the fiscal year 1919. 

Our total imports from Asia in the fiscal 
year 1920 — a full peace year — are five times 
as much in value as in the fiscal year imme- 
diately preceding the war, 1914, and our 
exports to Asia in 1920 are seven times as 
much in value as in the fiscal year 1914. 
The total trade of the United States with 
Asia in the fiscal year 1920 was $2,160,000,- 
000 as against just $400,000,000 in 1914. 

This tremendous increase in the trade with 
Asia applies to practically all its important 
trading sections. To Japan our sales in 1920 
were $460,000,000 against $51,000,000 in 
1914 — nine times as much in the after war 
year as in the pre-war year; to China the 
exports in the fiscal year 1920 were $115,- 
000,000 against $25,000,000 in 1914; to 
India $78,000,000 against $11,000,000 in 
1914, or seven times as much now as imme- 



BLANCO'S 

Farrell and Larkin Sts. 
Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without 
dining in the finest cafe in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner $1.75 



SUMMONS 

105936 

In the Superior Court of the Slate of California 

in and for the City and County of San Francisco. 
Olga Elizabeth Ennis, Plaintiff, 

vs. 
John Cradock Ennis, Defendant. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the 
Stale of California in and for the City and Counly 
of San Francisco, and the complaint filed in the 
office of the County Clerk of said City and County. 

The peopie of the Stale of California send greet- 
ing to John Cradock Ennis and Mrs. J. Avrillaud, 
Defendants. 

You are hereby required to appear in an action 
brought against you by the above named Plaintiff in 
the Superior Court of the State of California, in 
and for the City and Counly of San Francisco, and 
to answer the Complain! filed therein within ten days 
(exclusive of the day of service) after the service on 
you of this summons, if served within this City and 
Counly; or if served elsewhere within thirty days. 

The said action is brought to obtain a judgment 
and decree of this Court dissolving the bonds of 
matrimony now existing between plaintiff and de- 
fendant, on the ground of defendant John Cradock 
Ennis' adultery with said Mrs. J. Avrillaud, and of 
said John Cradock Ennis' desertion of plaintiff, also 
for general relief, as will more fully appear in the 
Complaint on file, to which special reference is 
hereby made. 

And you are hereby notified that, unless you ap- 
pear and answer as above required, the said Plain- 
tiff will take judgment for any moneys or damages 
demanded in the Complaint as arising upon contract, 
or will apply to the Court for any other relief de- 
manded in the Complaint. 

Given under my hand and the Seal of the Super- 
ior Court of the Slate of California, in and for the 
City and County of San Francisco, this I 5th day of 
April A. D. 1920. 

(Seal) H. I. MULCREVY. Clerk. 

By L. J. WELCH. Deputy Clerk 

Frank D. Macbeth. 508 Humboldt Bank Bide., San 

Francisco. Cal., Attorney for Plaintiff. 



CLOCK 
REPAIRING 




ALL MAKES 
OF CLOCKS 
REPAIRED 



WATCH DEPARTMENT 
Chimes and complicated clocks a specialty 
Clocks kept in order by contract, town and 

country 

We carry an attractive line of new clocks 

Work guaranteed in every detail 

CALIFORNIA CLOCK CO. 

418-19 Whitney Bldg. 133 Geary Street 

Phone Garfield 2570 J. Topping, Manager 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 

PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 
Offices— 505-507— 323 Geary Street 

Phone Douglas 2433 



diately preceding the war; to the Dutch East 
Indies $45,000,000 against sightly less than 
$4,000,000 in 1914, twelve times as much 
in 1920 as in 1914; to the Philippines $72,- 
000.C00 against $27,000,000 in 1914; to 
Hongkong $20,000,000 in 1920, against 
$I0.000,0C0 in 1914; and to Straits Settle- 
ments $15,000,000 against $4,000,000 in 
1914. 

On the import side, the increase in the 
trade by countries is correspondingly great, 
those from Japan aggregating a little over 
$500,000,000 against $107,000,000 in 
1914; from China $225,000,000 against 
$40,000,000 in 1914; from India $180,- 
000.C00 against $74,000,000 in 1914; from 
Dutch East Indies $97,000,000 against $6.- 
000.000 in 1914; and from the Philippines 
$70X00,000 against $18,000,000 in the 
year before the war. 



U. S. MARINES TO RELIEVE HOUSING 
SHORTAGE 

The slogan "Build Your Own Home" has 
superseded the old "Let's Go" of the A. E. 
F., with the versatile students of the Marine 
Corps Institute here who are doing their bit 
to meet the housing shortage of the nation. 
A model two-story cottage with its living, 
dining and bedrooms, kitchenette and bath 
is being erected by Marines who have se- 
lected the "building foreman course," under 
the supervision of Lieut. Stanley Klos, a 
product of the prairie country. 

For the purpose of instruction half of the 
model cottage will be left in framing to show 
the building details. Plumbing and wiring 
will be indicated throughout. The interior 
will show two forms of stairs construction. 
The cottage will be weatherboarded and the 
roof shingled. 



A GREAT TIME 

Mike appeared the day after the wake 
looking as if he had been in a football game 
or had been hit by a pile driver. 

"And did you enjoy yourself at the 
wake?" he was asked. 

"We sure had one great time," replied 
Mike. "There was only one sound nose left 
in the party after it was over, and that one 
belonged to the taykittle." — Ladies' Home 
Journal. 



DANCING AND DINNERS 

The music of the Techau Dance Orchestra 
is so entrancing that the Techau Tavern has 
become the most popular place for dancers 
in the city. Particularly after the theatre 
and during supper when lucky patrons are 
given glove orders and silk stockings and 
gentlemen receive packages of Melachrinu 
cigarettes. The regular luncheon offers a 
most attractive menu. Techau, 247 Powell 
street, is well worth a visit. 



July 24, 1920 

Wedding Presents: The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell streets. 



Want a Better Position? 

Bell Syllabic Shorthand in Six Weeks. 

Bell Touch Typewriting in Six Weeks. 

Our Complete Stenographic or "Dictaphone" 
Course in about Two Months. 

If you wish to prepare in ONE-FOURTH 
the time and at ONE-FOURTH the cost, EN- 
ROLL NOW. 

One of our courses makes an ideal Holiday 
for the wife, son or daughter, and PROTECTS 
THEIR future for all time. Individual instruc- 
tion. Day and Evening. 

Investigation costs you nothing, and may save 
regret. 

THE SYLLABIC INSTITUTE 
"The 6 Weeks' Business School." 

376 Sutter Street. (Douglas 4316) 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

INSURANCE BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 



ALADDIN 
STUDIO 
TIFFIN 
ROOM 

220 POST V FOURTH FLOOR 

SAN FRANCISCO 

m 

SPECIALIZING FIFTY CENT 
LUNCH 



HATTIE MOOSER 
M. C. MOOSER 




N W CORNER 
POLK AND POST STS. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

VENETIAN SCENES AT THE FINE ARTS 
BUILDING 

In keeping with the policy established for 
the Comparative Room in the Palace of Fine 
Arts, Director Laurvik has just installed 
several new paintings that help further to 
emphasize various important tendencies in 
the art of painting. He has been fortunate 
enough to obtain two remarkably fine ex- 
amples of the famous Seventeenth Century 
Italian painter of Venetian scenes, Can- 
nelleto, who is now represented in this col- 
lection by two beautiful views on the Canal 
of Venice, painted with all his sparkling 
verve and color. The manner of his char- 
acterization of the architecture of Venice 
which gives them an authentic and docu- 
mentary interest, is in striking contrast with 
the broad and very generalized impressionism 
of the landscape by Claude Monet and 
Pissaro and "Le Sidanier" lent by Mrs. 
Manfred Bransten. 

If one compares these beautiful examples 
of the impressionistic school with the un- 
usually fine landscape by Turner shown in 
this room, it becomes clearly apparent how 
deeply indebted were the great Frenchmen 
to the great English innovator who has so 
often been called the father of modern art. 

With the addition of these notable can- 
vases, the Comparative Room in the Palace 
of Fine Arts illustrates in a most interesting 
manner the diverse tendencies that con- 
tributed to develop ancient and modern art. 
And nothing could make this more easily ap- 
parent than the carefully worked out juxta- 
position of kindred and opposite viewpoints 
shown here. 



13 



CORRECTION BY THE SOUTHERN 
PACIFIC R. R. 

To correct an apparent misunderstanding 
among shippers the Southern Pacific Com- 
pany announced recently that its recent 
application for permission to operate its 
Atlantic Steamship Lines between points on 
the Atlantic Seaboard and the Gulf Coast. 
which was denied by the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission, had no reference to the 
regular Morgan Line service, but was 
merely a request to be allowed to render 
tonal service between outlying ports 
and New Orleans and Galveston, and also to 
render occasional service to the Port of 
Houston whenever there was tonnage in 
sight to warrant the run. The present Mor- 
gan Line service is not affected by this 
decision. 



"Hear about Bill Bottlenose? He's got a 
case of lumbago at his house?" "I guess I'd 
better run over and help him drink it up." 



If a mistake be made on policies the \ oters 
can blame but themsebes. The c 
be theirs. 



ts? Casa del Rey 

is a million dollar fire-proof hotel, on 
the sunny bathing beach at Santa 
Cruz. It offers the advantages of 
tennis, golf, motoring, fishing and 
swimming, and is the center of Santa 
Cruz social life. 

MORRIS & WARNER, Props. 



IHI@ti©D S(L MfSiftfew 



217 Second Avenue, San Mateo 
SPECIAL SUNDAY DINNER $1.00 
MEALS A LA CARTE 

Special attention paid to banquets, automobile 
parties and tourists. The only first-class a la 
carle restaurant in San Mateo. The hotel is 
entirely new; hot and cold water in every room. 
All well lighted. Rooms with private bath. 
Prices moderate. Summer rates given. Elevator 
service. 



EPPLER'S 

BAKERY and LUNCH 

886 Geary Street 



Branch Confectionery 

SUTTER and POWELL STREETS 
Phone Douglas 1912 



The Cecil Hotel 

of San Francisco offers 
the perfect combination 
of home and hotel life. 
Cuisine excellent. Lux- 
ury of billiard, card and 
reading rooms. 

Mr.. O. E. MORRIS. Proprietor. 



J. R l*..u J. Bersez C. Ealanne 

L. Coutard C. Mailhebuau 

BERCEZ FRANK'S 

Old POODLE-DOG Co. 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

and Entertainment Every Evening 
41S-42I Bu»h S«., San FranciKO 
- Kearny) Exchange. Doug 2-41 1 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 24, 1920 



Pleasure's Wand 



Columbia Theatre — "The Firefly" 

Much of the "Firefly" music has already 
reached our Coast and become popular, so 
that one listening to the opera feels a bit 
like the man who saw "Hamlet" for the first 
time and remarked that the thing was full 
of familiar quotations. But it is all very 
pleasant music, and under the unerring 
baton of Paul Steindorf the melodious num- 
bers, from opening to finale, are given in the 
best manner and judging from the enthusi- 
astic applause of the large audience, are 
greatly enjoyed. Mr. Steindorf's kind heart 
leads him to give it to us again when we 
thank him with noisy hands, and that makes 
an eleven-thirty closing. 

The cast is well chosen and the chorus is 
charmingly attractive. Certainly nothing 
could be funnier than Jeff De Angelis, and 
it is a pleasure to again hear such artists as 
Humbird Duffy and Detmar Poppin. "De 
Trop" and "We're going to make a man of 
you" would take any one's mind off his 
troubles. In fact, the operetta is full of 
melodious music that tends to soothe the 
most savage breast — made savage by too 
much movies. 

And the voice of Mabel Riegelman! Its 
lovely velvety quality lingers in the head and 
in the heart. Her sympathy and understand- 
ing and her wide range, go to make her the 
great little singer that she is. When she 
sang "Giannina Mia" one wanted her to 
never leave off. With the soul for it and 
the voice for it, and with every evidence of 
the best training. Miss Riegelman will reign 
supreme in whatever field of opera she 
chooses, be it grand or light opera. 



"Peg 0' My Heart" at the Alcazar 

Regal Villa, near Scarborough in England, 
is a far cry from O'Farrell street in San 
Francisco. Henry Shumer's clever stage 
arrangements brought it all very close to us 
at the Alcazar; the atmosphere of the quiet, 
elegant English home was there, and the 
"grande dame" of Emilie Melville was so 
perfectly all right that the slightly overdone 
pomposity of Jarvis the butler could be ex- 
cused. As Mrs. Chichester, Miss Melville 
gives a finished bit of artistry that delights 
the discriminating eye and ear. Her old lace, 
her chatellaine, her gentle dignity, and that 
"most excellent thing in woman," her voice, 
all go to make her portrayal of the part 
well-nigh perfect. 

Emily Pinter's Ethel was very monotonous 
until her emotional scene came and then she 
really did some good acting. To Ben Erway 
the audience owes a big debt of gratitude, 
for he did well with the character of Aleric, 



type of young English aristocrat so popular 
on the American stage, and gave us some of 
the best laughs of the evening, though his 
audience could not quite bring itself to a 
round of applause when he left the stage 
by the stairs after his proposal to Peg, no 
doubt thinking that such a demonstration 
might be mistaken for approval of the 
egregious English. Christian Brent was a 
weak-kneed villain as done by Brady Cline, 
his immobility of feature and inflexibility of 
voice depriving his would-be love scenes with 
Ethel of all thrills. When he remarked in a 
flat tone devoid of inflection, that he was 
"carried away" by his passion, we did not 
believe a word of it. 

The entrance of Inez Ragan as the im- 
mortal Peg was delightful and one immedi- 
ately realized that here was a gifted young 
actress with a valuable equipment of stage 
essentials — looks, voice, a sense of humor 
(oh, a most decided sense of humor!) ex- 
quisitely pretty hands and feet, and many 
winning little ways. One naturally thought 
back to the other Pegs who have made us 
laugh and cry, but this San Francisco Peg 
did not suffer in the comparison. It is not 
her fault, but the fault of Hartley Manners, 
that the most of her speeches are designed to 
"get a laugh." And they ARE funny. But 



did any other in the audience ever wish, 
while listening to Peg talk up to her English 
relatives, that her beloved "daddy" in New 
York had managed to instill somewhat of 
respect into her pleasing personality? 
Would it not have made us love Peg just a 
little more than we do this extremely ready- 



itted 



young person > 



Ho 



With Peg there came on the stage the 
darlingest dog that ever was — and such a 
good actor, too! His performance was per- 
fect, and the way he handled his feet ought 
to put him on a salary. Montgomery 
Hawkes (ah, the good, old stage lawyer, 
what'd we do without him?) proves that 
"where 's there's a will there's a law suit," 
and looks admirably his part. Rafael Bru- 
netto! Now, with a name like that and 
those eyes, a man ought to be playing more 
romantic parts. We hope to see him better 
cast. Jean Oliver is as pretty and pert a 
maid as any one would wish to look at and 
listen to. 

And then there's that handsome Dudley 
Ayres (we are taking them as they come on) 
with the deep tones in his voice and the 
lingering smile in his smouldering eyes, and 
that subtle something about his acting that 
is more suggestion than expression, and is 
certainly alluring. 

The play went very well, and the music 
helped a lot. One recognized many well- 
known people in the house, as the audience 
rose and made its way out, after a typical 
Alcazar evening, one of pleasure and 
comfort. 



AW v<w 


, 


Of 


1 ! 

* *> 


1 


: * ( ■ 

it 




rn^rn 


rffi' && 


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A. ' 


. 4 i I :> 



IVyatti Lads and Lassies, al the Orpheum Ncxl lVeef(, 



July 24, 1920 

Orpheum Attractions 

A diverting program of music and dancing 
and fun started off with Chong and Rosie 
Moey in their Chinese version of American 
songs and dances. They are graceful and 
resourceful, and their rendition of a cake 
walk was mirth provoking. "The Man Off 
the Ice Wagon" dressed in the garb so 
familiar in most other cities when the hot 
wave comes, but seldom seen in our breezy 
San Francisco, showed that he was wise 
when he changed his vocation, and in an 
excellent baritone voice sang among other 
songs, "Good-bye to Summer" very effect- 
ively. Louise Dresser, handsome and digni> 
fied, together with Jack Gardner, a humorist 
and character actor, met with much ap- 
plause. The chap who did a "Creole 
Fashion Plate" is a very clever female im- 
personator. Every one was genuinely sur- 
prised when he finished singing "Come Out 
and Meet Me, Dear" and pulled off his hat 
and wig, disclosing the fact that he is a 
mere man. "Visions of 1970" is a bright 
idea, very well carried out, showing imagina- 
tion and ingenuity on the part of the author. 
Jack Lait, and very good acting by Percy 
Bronson and Winnie Baldwin. There is a 
lot of real fun in this act. Miss Irene 
Franklin has much versatility and a fine 
voice; her impersonations are clever. Burton 
Green gave her able assistance at the piano. 
The Stantons in "English Boys from 
America," are wholesome and amusing. 
They are good looking boys. The three 
Danoise sisters gave some new stunts in cos- 
tume gymnastics. 



At the Orpheum Next Week 

"Rubeville," better than a railway ticket 
and a week's vacation to the country, comes 
back to the Orpheum Sunday. Every vaude- 
ville fan of several recent seasons recalls 
with delight the effect created by this para- 
phrase of crossroads life. 

The same silver concert band, the same 
grocery store round stove and the same 
crowd whittling shavings will be seen again. 
In the cast will be Harry B. Watson and 
Reg. B. Merville for the stellar rube inter- 
pretations. 

Jack Wyatt and his Scotch lads and 
lassies, each one direct from the land o' the 
heather and the highlands of Scotland, in 
kilts and tartans will interpret a bit of 
"Hoot Mon" dance and song. In connection 
with their Dundee offering will be interpreted 
a flavor of American atmosphere which 
makes their turn especially well adapted to 
Yank vaudeville. 

Solly Ward, a comedian who misuses 
English with the same frequency of Sam 
Bernard, in company with Marion Murray, 
will offer a satirical comedy in one act en- 
titled "Babies." How a quarreling couple 
is held together by an orphanage of found- 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

lings furnishes the basis for most of the 
comedy. 

Irene Franklin, the eminent American 
comedienne and the Creole Fashion Plate, 
whose delineations have been the surprise of 
this week's show, will remain for another 
seven days. 

Jim and Marian Harkins will indulge in 
the .popular national sport of gossip in their 
turn, entitled "They Talk About Their 
Neighbors." Francis Yates and Gus Reed 
promise to accomplish a deceit but guaran- 
tee to secure the forgiveness of their audi- 
ences. Jeanette Childs will be found to be 
a singing comedienne. Bert and Hazel 
Skatelle will be seen in a surprising dancing 
novelty. 

Weekly news pictorial and Topics of the 
Day together with the Orpheum orchestra 
concert are the other anticipated features. 



15 



Alcazar 

From the laughter and pathos of "Peg 0' 
My Heart," delightfully portrayed this week, 
the versatile players of the New Alcazar 
will next Sunday turn to the essentially 
American comedy "A Tailor Made Man," 
which the late Harry James Smith, cut off 
at the height of his success, made joyous 
with youth, optimism and the sheer audacity 
of a big ambition. Its hero, plucky, re- 
sourceful, highly charged with the magnetic 
force that gives youngsters of this feverish 
period power to conquer obstacles, is a 
clothes-presser through necessity. While 
ironing out the creases in a plutocrat's "dress 
suit," it occurs to him that he would like to 
be a plutocrat himself, just to see how it 
feels. Calmly arraying himself in borrowed 
finery he invades a fashionable function, 
financed by seventeen cents of his own and 
a $50 bill that he finds in the purloined vest 
pocket. He is a swift worker and quickly 
rises to dizzy eminence in high society and 
big business. This p'ay requires the largest 
cast assembled in years at the Alcazar — 
some twenty-five speaking characters — and 
is a costly thing to stage for a single week. 
Dudley Ayres personates the human live- 
wire John Paul Bart; Inez Ragan. fascinat- 
ing Tanya, the tailor's daughter; Alfred 
Hesse, of Ethel Barrymore's New York com- 
pany, the fiery foreign idealist Dr. Sonntag. 
and Henry Shumer the gentle old tailor, 
with Emily Pinter. Jean Oliver. Gladys 
Emmons. Eunice Gilman. Grate Finnell. 
Brady Kline, Ben Erway, Rafael Brunetto. 
Al Cunningham and the standard favorites 
ic.wily reinforced. 

"Fair and Warmer," due Sunday August 
I. is fast and furious frivolity of fever heat 
temperature never staged at the Alcazar, but 
has caused the mercury in the farcial ther- 
mometer to boil over the top in all sorts of 
climatic zones. American. European and 
Antipodean. 



THE PALACE HOTEL 
for 



S 



ervice 

atisfaction 

miles 



A WONDERFULLY EFFECTIVE 
COMBINATION 

Management of 
HALSEY E. MANWARING 



SAM FRANCISCO 



W NAV>OfcN\U.fc 



i 



S ^*QH>W\&\OLuX ^ B g 




Next Week— Starting Sunday 



Rubeville" 

Featuring Harry B. Watson and 
Reg. B. Merville 



Jack Wyatt's 

Scotch Lads & Lassies 



JIM & MARIAN HARKINS I YATES & REED 



Solly Ward & Co. 

A Satirical Comedy in one act. 
"BABIES" 



"Creole Fashion 
Plate" 



JEANETTE CHIIDS 



IRENE FRANKLIN 

with BURTON GREEN 

Evening Prlct — 25o, 50c, 78c. $1 
Hatluee Prlct b— 25o, iOc, i c 
(Except Saturdays, Sundass and Rollda] 
MATINKK DAILY D Bias 70 

DON'T LET A BCA.LPER SCALr YlM 

ALCAZAR 

THIS WEEK ONLY-TIM PLAY 

ADORABLE 

"PEG O' MY HEART" 

\\ II K COM. NEXT SUN. MAT. JULY 25 

Big Special Cast of 1 wenty-live in the Famous 

Cohan and Harris Comedy Success 

"A TAILOR MADE MAN" 

The Audacious Adventures of Ambitious Youth. 
Wittily. Delightfully Described by 

Harry James Smith. 

NEW ALCAZAR COMPANY 

DUDLEY AYRES INEZ RAGAN 

SI V MAT.. AUG. I— The Comedy Cocktail 

Avery Hopwood's High Temperature Frivolity 

"FAIR AND WARMER" 

Boiling over with Feverish Fun- 
SOON— "Rebecca of Sunny Brook Farm." 



Pioneer 


Carpet Cleaning Works 


Renovating Sewing Laying Sizing 

Especially Equipped for Handling 

Valuable Rugs and Carpets 


Prompt MOTOR TRUCK SERVICE 


Established 1868 Tel. Doug. 3084 


353 Tehama St 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 24, 1920 



The Motorists 



With the attention of both the motorist 
and the distributor turned to gasoline 
economy, the entire Pacific Coast automo- 
bile fraternity sat up and took notice when 
the results of last week's Jordan economy 
tour became known. 

A Jordan Silhouette Six — one of the stock 
touring cars on C. D. Rand Company's floor 
in this city — covered 464 miles from San 
Francisco to Atascadero, mid-point between 
San Francisco and Los Angeles, and return, 
on exactly 16.67 gallons of gasoline, rolling 
up the astonishing average of 27.84 miles 
to the gallon. 

The route included a fair share of stiff, 
California grades, dirt roads, with plenty of 
strong head winds to overcome, and was a 
strictly conducted test in every way, a well 
known San Francisco newspaper man, ac- 
companying the tour as official observer. 

Following is the summary of the Jordan 
Economy Tour, day by day, and for the 
entire trip: 

First Day — San Francisco to King City, 
161.7 miles; 6 gallons of gas consumed; 
average, 26.95 miles to the gallon. 

Second Day — King City to Atascadero 
and return, including tour of the Atascadero 
estates; 139.6 miles; 4% gallons of gas 
consumed; average, 28.64 miles to the 
gallon. 

Third Day — King City to San Francisco, 
with slight detour on leaving King City; 163 
miles; 5 gallons 6 1-3 pints of gas con- 
sumed; average, 28.15 miles to the gallon. 

Entire Trip — San Francisco to Atasca- 
dero and return with detours as noted; 464 
miles; 16:67 gallons of gas consumed; 
average, 27.84 miles to the gallon. 
© * 9 

Three good routes to Santa Cruz are re- 
ported open, as a result of recent road- 
scouting trips. The Soquel road is open 
only to traffic from San Francisco to Santa 
Cruz, but the Coast route and the Big Basin 
read are available for use going either north 
or south. 

9 9 9 

With the growth of King Eight business 
in California in the past few months, the 
King manufacturers have found it necessary 
to divide the territory in this State into two 
parts, and have named Max Arnold their 
Northern California distributor. This ap- 
pointment has come as the result of a visit to 
the Coast by E. A. Scheu, general sales 
manager for the King Motor Car company. 

Max Arnold has gained a reputation as a 
thoroughly successful business man in the 
high grade used car field, but he is closing 
out his line of "Superbilt" cars in order to 



make way for the large shipments of King 
Eights that are on their way to San Fran- 
cisco. He has an exceptionally capacious 
building, one of the finest on San Fran- 
cisco's "Auto Row," and already has a com- 
plete service department ready to handle the 
King business. 

-:- © 9 

Plans for the great Traffic Officers' con- 
vention and Safety First Exposition to be 
held in this city, August 23 to 27 are 
rapidly taking on final shape. Nationwide 
importance of this gathering from a safety- 
first standpoint is being realized by the great 
national organizations whose work lies along 
these lines. 

Large delegations will represent the 
National Automobile Underwriters Con- 
ference and the National Workmen's Com- 
pensation Bureau at the convention, and 
each will bring forward proposals for increas- 
ing the safety of the motorist and of the men 
engaged in automotive industries of every 
kind. 

the basic purpose of the entire conven- 
tion and exposition is to educate the Nation 
as to the necessity for traffic regulations that 
are uniform from one end of the country to 
the other. 

Miles Brothers, industrial motion picture 
experts, have been engaged to film the expo- 
sition and convention officially. These pic- 
tures, showing among other things the inter- 
esting non-skid tire tests, the airbrake tests, 
the headlight tests and the various other 
exhibits of the exposition, together with con- 
vention scenes, will be shown throughout the 
United States to aid in forwarding the aims 
of the traffic experts in standardizing traffic 
laws. 

© © 9 

Valuable first-hand information on the gas 
shortage situation is contained in the official 
report of Robert W. Martland. secretary of 
the California Automobile Trade Association, 
who has just completed a two week survey 
of the entire oil situation in this State. 
Martland's investigation was complete in 
every respect as he visited every oil field of 
importance and questioned the officials of 
each of the larger oil-producing companies 
of the State. 

The gas shortage will be a thing of the 
past perhaps as early as August 15, he be- 
lieves, and there will be no recurrence of this 
year's troubles the coming season, he 
states. 

Charges that the gas shortage was the 
result of fictitious causes, that it had been 
"engineerer" by the oil companies were 
found to have been without foundation of 



fact. The present gas shortage resulted 
from natural causes and the opening of new 
fields by Federal act, together with the ap- 
plication of the new processes for "cracking" 
gasoline will end it just as naturally, 
Martland believes. 

9 9 9 
The gas trouble has affected the summer 
resort business of the State to a great ex- 
tent. One resort has been able to get along 
without a day's inconvenience in this respect. 
Camp Curry, in Yosemite valley, had over 
30.000 gallons of gas on hand when the first 



U. S. GARAGE 

750 Bush St. Phone Garfield 713 



PEARSON GARAGE 

345 Bush St. Phone Douglas 2120 

Repair Shop and Annex 350 Bush St. 



Largest and Most Complete Garages in 
the West 



quality 

TIRE SHOP 

Expert Tire and 
Tube Repairers 

Quality Retreading 



MARSHALL SQUARE 
VULCANIZING GO. 

10 Marshall Square 

flrfc SI. nil NMtl 
Phone Marhjt 3837 



AUTOMOBILE STARTING 
LIGHTING SYSTEMS 


AND 


Give satisfactory results when given 
lenlion. We specialize on Electrical 
storage batteries, etc., and guarantee 


proper al- 
equipmenl. 

satisfaction. 


GUARANTEE 


BATTERY 


CO. 


Brand 
955 Post St. 


& Cushman 

Phone Prospccl 741 



— There are many garages in town and the 
motorist is often in a quandary as to where 
to go, especially for permanent service. 
There are very few who give you the quality 
of service of Dow & Green, on Taylor street, 
between O'Farrell and Geary. Here your car 
will receive something more than the "once 
over," and the prices are moderate. 



July 24, 1920 

news of the shortage came out. It still has 
an ample reserve supply on hand and will 
apparently last out the summer without 
running low, which is a source of great joy 
to the California motor tourist who makes 
the Yosemite his yearly vacation goal. 
© © S) 

Here are some good things to know about 
your car, especially in case you ever had 
occasion to want to show a hard-boiled 
judge ypu knew something about its limi- 
tations and safety possibilities. If you ever 
got involved in an accident, say through no 
fault of your own, it would be a good thing 
to know the answers to the following 
questions : 

1. What is the make of your car? 

2. What horse-power? 

3. How many cylinders? 

4. What kind of tire on each wheel? 

5. What speed can you make? 

5. How much mileage to a gallon of 
gasoline? 

7. In what distance can you stop your 
car without skidding? 

8. What kind of brake lining do you use? 
The average motorist can answer the first 

six of these without difficulty, but when it 
comes to questions No. 7 and 8 it's another 
matter. Learn the answers to these im- 
portant questions at your earliest oppor- 
tunity. 

In these days of universal motoring, it's 
almost as important to "Know Thy Car" as it 
is to "Know Thyself." 

© © © 

NEW NASH FOUR UNUSUALLY 

FLEXIBLE AND FREE FROM 

VIBRATION 

Two important features which always 
have characterized Nash products are in- 
corporated efficiently in the new Nash Four 
to be built in Milwaukee. These points are 
unusual flexibility and freedom from 
vibration. 

While no announcement has been made 
as to just when the Nash Four will be in pro- 
duction, it is known that the Milwaukee 
plant of the Nash Motors company, in the 
fact of the present material situation, is 
making progress and that cars will be ready 
for delivery to dealers some time before 
winter sets in. 

The Nash Four, equipped with the deep 
breathing Nash perfected valve-in-head 
motor, has power, pick-up and flexibility 
beyond the ordinary. Tests have shown that 
in congested traffic it moves along in "high" 
or gets away quickly when occasion de- 
mands, always instantly responding to the 
driver's will. 

Being low hung upon unusually long 
springs it has a low center of gravity and so 
holds the road at all speeds without side- 
sway, making for both comfortable riding 
and easy steering qualities. All controls 
are so placed that the hands and feet fall 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

naturally into driving position. The clutch 
and brake pedals and the control and 
emergency levers bear out the feature of 
flexibility further by lending themselves to 
exceptionally easy operation. 

Nash engineering, furthermore, has made 
the Nash Four unusually free from vibration. 
The door supports are built permanently into 
the car, and assure a minimum of vibration 
to the body, and a well thought out and 
carefully balanced construction has made the 
motor vibration practically negligible. 

One of the chief factors in keeping this 
vibration to a minimum is the big inherently 
counter balanced crankshaft. As in the 
construction of the Nash Six motor each 
crankshaft as it comes through the factory 
is tested on a machine which registers even 
the slightest inaccuracy. This insures mini- 
mum vibration as well as increased power. 



17 



Potted Plants 
and Ferns 

OF DISTINCTION 

SUITABLE FOR ANY 

OCCASION AT NURSERY 

PRICES 

Bay Counties Seed Co. and 

Nurseries 

404 Market Street, San Francisco 



AT MARQUARD'S 

There is a peculiar "difference" at Cafe 
Marquard, on the corner of Geary and 
Mason streets, in Fred Solari's old site, 
which will appeal to the patron who is 
satiated with the ordinary features of ordi- 
nary restaurants. It may be the dazzling 
talents of the Grand Prix Beauty Revue, or 
the special catering of its luncheon service 
to business men (from 12 to 2) or its 
"jazzaraine" orchestra, or an aggregation of 
all of these attractive features. Wherever 
the charm lies, it has a fascination all its 
own, for the regular dansant (from 2:30 to 
5:30) and the dinner de luxe (from 6 to 9) 
have a daily attendance which proves its 
potency. 



Old Hampshire Bond 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

The Standard Paper for Business Stationery. 
"Made a litlle better than seems necessary." The 
typewriter papers are sold in attractive and durable 
boxes containing live hundred perfect sheets, plain 
or marginal ruled. The manuscript covers are sold 
in similar boxes containing one hundred sheets. 
Order through your printer or stationer, or, if so de- 
sired we will send a sample book showing the entire 
line. 

BLAKE, MOFFIT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
37-45 FIRST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



E. F. HUTTON & GO. 



MEMBERS 



New York Stock Exchange 

490 California St. and St. Francis Hotel 
Branch: Del Monte Hotel 

Private Wires 
Coast to Coast 



SUNSHINE GARAGE 

HIGHWAY AND 12TH AVE., SAN MATEO. 
Auto repairing, painting, top and curtain work, and upholstering. A full and com- 
plete line of automobile accessories at city prices. All our work guaranteed. Day and 
night service. All work done by competent mechanics. Give us a trial and be convinced. 
Distributors and service for Exide batteries. Phone San Mateo 33. 




18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 24, 1920 



Sunbeams 



"Do you suppose there ever was a human 
being who didn't talk about his neighbors?" 
asked the cynical man. "Sure," said the 
genial citizen. "Name him." "Robinson 
Crusoe." 



"Does your wife believe what the ouija 
board says?" "Yes," replied Mr. Meekton. 
"And she's rijht. If my wife puts her hand 
on a ouija board it's going to say what she 
believes, or nothing." 



Redd — That fellow Block's got a mighty 
good memory. Greene — How do you know? 
Redd — Because he borrowed $5 from me 
over a year ago, and he remembers it so well 
that he's never asked me for a loan since. 



Mr. Younghusband — If you will give me 
the oil, my dear, I will oil the casters of this 
chair so that they won't creak. Mrs. Young- 
husband — Oh, Harry, darling, we haven't a 
drop of castor oil in the house. 



"Mr. Grabcoin rather belittles the value of 
a college education." "That's because he 
can't figure out how the sum total of Jack 
Grabcoin's achievements for the rest of his 
life will be worth the amount of money it is 
taking to get him through his sophomore 
year." 



"Ella's new photo must be a jolly good 
likeness." "Why?" "She's had it two days, 
and hasn't shown it to any one." 



"Well, do you find golf all you expected?" 
"All and more, sir," replied Mr. Dubwaite, 
who recently took up the game. "Yes?" "I 
used to think I had a pretty good flow of 
lurid language when I was changing an auto- 
mobile tire or mending a puncture, but con- 
fronted by the necessities of golf, I'm as 
dumb as an oyster." 



The village paper intended to eulogize the 
local veteran as "one of the most distin- 
guished of our battle-scarred heroes." 

A lapsing proof-reader let it be printed 
"battle-scared." Of course the irate colonel 
demanded an apology and correction. The 
following issue announced that by mistake 
reference had been made to Colonel Brown 
which failed to express the high esteem in 
which he was held by his fellow citizens, 
and that the sentence should have read: 
"Colonel Brown was one of the most distin- 
guished of our bottle-scarred heroes." — 
Everybody's. 



"Oh, doctor, tell me, quick!" moaned the 
fair patient, clasping her lap-dog and con- 
vulsively nibbling at a thousand-dollar check, 
How sick am I? Is it California, Florida, or 
Europe ?" — Seattle Post-Intelligences. 



When a merchant puts an unreasonable 
price on something you must have, there is 
nothing to do but leave his store angry and 
pay some other merchant the same price. — 
Kansas City Star. 



Fig Packing Demonstration 

Mrs. Fred Hansen has installed a miniature packing plant in our strrc, where she is demonstrating to 
the public the modern methods and sanitary conditions under which 

SIERRA BRAND FIGS AND RAISINS Are Packed 

This special event should not be overlooked by anyone. 

Special prices on all of Mrs. Hansen's packs during this demonstration. 

Now at GOLDBERG, BOWEN & COMPANY, Grocers, 242 Sutter St. 



CLINTON CAFETERIA 



136 O'FARRELL STREET 

Opposite Orphcum Theater 



Continuous Serving from 7 A. M. lo 8 I 3 . M. — Music. Lunch and Dinner Orchestral an J Vocal 



Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 



CAPITAL $3,000,000 
FIRE 



AUTOMOBILE 



ASSETS $22,500,000 
MARINE 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Co. in America" 

FIRE AUTOMOBILE WINDSTORM 



TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



REASONABLE RATES 




Don't Experiment With Your Eyes 

CONSULT 

DR. GEORGE MAYERLE 

Exclusive Eyesight Specialist 
And Expert Optometrist 

Scientific Eye Examinations 

OVER 25 YEARS 
IN SAN FRANCISCO 

MAYERLE'S Eyewater 
A Marvelous Eye Tonic 
For Children or Adults 

At Druggists 50 Cents 
By Mail 65 Cents 

San Francisco, California. 
960 Market St. 



Graneys Billiard Parlor 



Finest in the World 
Perfect Ventilation 
924 Market Street 
61 Eddy Street 



EDDIE GRANEY, Proprietor 



Telephone Sutter 6654 



Importers 



GEO. W. GASWELL GO. 

COFFEE AND TEA 

Spices, Baking Powder, Flavoring 

Extracts 

442-452 Second Street, San Francisco 



For that stubborn cough 
Use Old Snake Doctor's Cough Remedy 

SNAKE DRUG CO. 

Formerly G. Leipnitz & Co. 

Now Located at 

127-129 KEARNY ST. 



MacRORIE - McLAREN CO. 

FLORISTS, NURSERYMEN 

and 
LANDSCAPE ENGINEERS 

141 Powell Street, San Francisco 

Nurseries: San Mateo 

Phone San Mateo 1002 

Phone Douglas 4946 and Palace Hotel 



A. W. BEST 



ALICE BEST 



BEST'S 

ART SCHOOL 

1625 California Street 

Life Classes — Day and Night 

Illustrating Sketching Painting 



TIRES VULCANIZING 

THOMAS H. ELKINGTON 

Distributor for 

Kelly-Springfield Tires 

Long Mileage Tires and Second Hand Tires 

865 POST ST.. Near I Ivde 

Phone PROSPECT 1566 




FIREPROOF 

STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1636 Market St. 

Bet. Franklin .ind Gough 

Tel. Park 271 San Francisco 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



Bank of New South Wales 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of Pro- 
prietors 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Aggregate Assets, 30th 
Sept. 1919 




$20,000,000.00 
16,000,000.00 

20.000,000.00 



$335,181,247.00 



SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E., General Manager 



340 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States, New Zealand, Fiji, Papua (New 
Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australian Banking 

Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Aranged. 
Head Office: London Office: 



GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 



29 THREADNEEDLE STREET. E. C. 2 



Agents: 
Bank of California, National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bank, Crocker Nat'l Bank 



Direct Foreign Banking 1 Service 

Importers and exporters employing the facilities of our Foreign Department incur none 
of the risks incident to inexperience or untried theory in the handling of their overseas 
transactions. 

For many years we have provided Direct Service reaching all the important money 
and commercial centers of the civilized world. 

The excellence of that service is evidenced by its preference and employment by rep- 
resentative concerns at the East and other banking centers throughout the United States. 

RESOURCES OVER ONE HUNDRED TWENTY MILLION DOLLARS 

THE ANGLO & LONDON-PARIS NATIONAL BANK 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO. CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Rescn, fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL HANKING Transacted 

STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREICN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLI ( riONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

«5 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and at LONDON. F.NG .: NEW YORK: 

PORTLAND, ORE.: SEATTLE. WASH Ml \ICO CITY. MEXICO 

SA i FRANCISCO OFFICE. 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 

BRUCE HI ATI 1COTF.. Manager \V. I COULTHARD. Assistant Manage. 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (TNI SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

Member of the I rrletal Reserve Bank of San Francisco 

Member nl the Associated Savings Banks of San Fran* 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 2lsl Streets 

PARK PRESIDIO DIM KM UK V.NCH Clement and 7th Avenue 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH lla.ghl and Belvedere Street, 

DECEMBI R 31. 1919 

Awed Capital Actually Paid I I 1.000000.00 

Deposits '17 Reserve and Contingent Fund, 2.488.107.78 

Employees' Pension Funde 1330,95136 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK. President 

i OURN\ \ ice-Pres. and Slanaee, A 1 1 R SCI IMIDT. Vice-Pro. and Cashier 

E T. KRUSE \.ce- President A. H. MULLER. Secrelarv 

\\M D. NEWHOUSE \ss.slanl Secretary 

Will 1AM HERRMANN. Assislail Cashier Gl iMMEL, A-.istant Cashier 

< Assistant Cashier R \ >, LIN. Assistant Cashier 

I W III II R. Manager Mission Branch W. C HEYER. Mana 2 ,r Parlc-Pres.dio Dul. Branch 

O. I PAULS! N. Manager Ha,: u ! Sired Brand 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
IOIIN A 1 i WALTER A HAAS 

rOl KN> V 1 1 R SCHMIDT HUGH GOODFEU.OW [.. N VAN BFRBEN 
1 V. CHRISTENS N ROBERT DOl ' L. S. SHERMAN 

GOOPF1.LLOW. EELLS. MOORE «. ORRiCK. General Attorneys 



4 



A Taxi Record 

The Hudson Taxi Co. of De- 
troit reported last year an 
average of 15,000 miles from 
Miller Cords in this hard serv- 
ice. Lately they report that 
some Miller Tires are giving 
25,000 miles. 




Tread Patented 

Center tread smooth, 
with suction cups to 
firmly grasp wet as- 
phalt. Geared-to-the- 
Road side treads 
mesh like cogs in dirt. 



THE MILLER RUBBER CO. 
Akron, Pl.io 

Also makers A Miller Inner 
Tubes, red and gray, built layer- 
on-layer, by (he same skill used in 
making surgeons' gloves. 




Mileage Records 

That Made Miller Tires The Sensation 



Since 1914, the average mileage of 
Miller Tires has been more than doubled. 

Hundreds of thousands hav; found this 
out and told the facts to otheis. And the 
demand for Miller Tires in that time has 
multiplied twenty-fold. 

Every year the swing to Millers gains 
momentum. This year's increase at the 
present rate, will exceed $25,000,000. 

The time has come when every tire 
user owes himself a test of these new- 
grade tires. 

Supreme Tests 

In the past few years, thousands of 
large users have been makii g compari- 
sons. Some have made million-mile tests. 
As high as 21 makes have been compared 
with the Millers on stage I nes. trucks 
and taxis. 

As a result. Miller Tires are now used 
exclusively in some of the hardest services. 

They are used on the larjest Pacific 
Coast stage lines. They are used on roads 
which heretofore made pneimatic-tired 
stages impossible. 

In some of the hardest test; they have 
excelled all rivals by margins almost un- 
believable. 

Amazing Records 

A new-grade tread, perfected by Miller, 
has in countless factory tests excelled 
the best of others by 25 per cent. 



Miller Inner Tubes, built layer on 
layer, have created a new tube standard. 

Such tire uniformity has been attained 
that in some large centers last year not 
a single Miller Tire was returned for 
adjustment. 

How We Did It 

For 24 years the Miller factory has 
specialized in fine rubber. Ten years ago, 
when we started tire building, we re- 
solved to attain a super-grade of tire. 

We keep 250 tires constantly running 
under observation. When a tire excels 
or a tire falls down we learn the reason 
for it. 

For years every Miller Tire has been 
signed. Every tire that comes back is 
traced to maker end inspector. And 
experts search the fault. 

We spend $1000 daily in watching and 
testing our materials and tires. We spend 
$300 daily just to test cotton materials. 
And every lot of tread stock is first 
vulcanized and tested in our laboratory. 



These caRiul methods, continued for 
years, have produced a tire you should 
know. Try a Miller on your car and 
watch it. You will gam a new concep- 
tion of what modern tires can do. 



miilerTires 

Cords Geared-to-the-Road Fabrics 

The Most Talked-About Tires in America 

CALIFORNIA BRANCHES 

San Francisco. Market and Van Ness Ave. Los Angeles. 1233-35 South Hope St. 

Oakland, 2316 Broadway 



CAL I F STATf Ll)i 
SAC11EMENT11 
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C&amuel JV. &frortrJdc?e 






■i 


For United States Senator 


I 





Telephone Sutter 6654 



Importers 



GEO, W, GASWELL GO. 

COFFEE AND TEA 

Spices, Baking Powder, Flavoring 

Extracts 

442-452 Second Street. San Francisco 



For thai stubborn cough 
Use Old Snake Doctor's Cough Remedy 

SNAKE DRUG CO. 

Formerly G. Leipnitz & Co. 

Now Located at 

127-129 KEARNY ST. 



MacRORiE - McLaren co. 

FLORISTS. NURSERYMEN 

and 
LANDSCAPE ENGINEERS 

141 Powell Street, San Francisco 

Nurseries: San Mateo 

Phone San Mateo 1002 

Phone Douglas 49-46 and Palace Hotel 



V \V. BEST 



ALICE BEST 



BEST'S 

ART SCHOOL 

1625 California Street 

Life Classes — Day and Night 

Illustrating Sketching Painting 



TIRES VULCANIZING 

THOMAS H. ELKINGTON 

Distributor for 

Kelly-Springfield Tires 

Long Mileage Tires and Second Hand Tires 

865 POST ST.. Near Hyde 

Phone PROSPECT 1566 




FIREPROOF 

STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1636 Market St. 

Bet. Franklin and Gough 
Tel. Park 271 San Francisco 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of Pro- 
prietors 



$20,000,000.00 
16.000.000.00 



Aggregate Assets. 30th 
Sept. 1919 




$335,181,247.00 



SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E., General Manager 

340 BRANCHES and ACENCIES in the Australian Stales, New Zealand. Fiji, Papua (New 

Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australian Banking 

Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Aranged. 

London Office: 
29 THREADNEEDLE STREET. E. C. 2 
Agents: 
Bank of California, National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nal'l Bank, Crocker Nat'l Bank 



Head Office: 
GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO. CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 

STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and at LONDON, ENG; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND. ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager W. J. COULTHARD. Assistant Manager 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 California St., San Francico, Cal. 
Member of the Federal Reserve System 
Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 2lsl Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement and 7th Avenue 

I IAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haighl and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30. 1920 

Assets $66,840,376.95 Capital Actually Paid Up $ 1.000.000.00 

Deposits 63.352.269.17 Reserve and Contingent Funds 2.488.107.78 

Employees' Pension Fund $330,951.36 

OFFICERS 

|OI IN A. BUCK. President 

GEO. TOURNY. Vice-Pres. and Managei A. H. R. SCHMIDT. Vicc-Prcs. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE. Vice-President A. H. MULLER. Secretary 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE. Assistant Secreta.v 

WILLIAM HERRMANN. Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL. Assistant Cashier 

G. A. BELCHER. Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTE1N. Assist.-.nt Cashier 

C. W. HEYER. Manager Mission Branch W. C. HEYER. Manager Park-Presidio Dist. Branch 

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GOODFELLOW. EELLS. MOORE & ORRICK. General Attorneys 



EVERYONE FEELS the change that has come over business — The feeling is different 

from that of six months ago. or even one month ago. 
THE PERIOD OF EXPANDING CREDIT has been brought to an end. Loans are 

contracting. A big volume of money will soon be seeking investment. 
BOND PRICES which have been lower than in fifty years, will certainly strengthen as 

this demand makes itself more and more felt. 
HIGH INTEREST RATES cannot long continue. 

Our investment service is al your service 

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Devoted lo ihe Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. XCVIII. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., SATURDAY, JULY 31, 1920 



No. 4 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA AD- 
VERTISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 259 Minna Street, near Fourth, San Francisco, Cal. Telephone 
Kearny 720. Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-Office as second-class mail 
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-Villa 



rrende 



Even 



surfeited with murders and the wild 



Mexican bandit 
life in general. 



Venezuela is extending the hand of friendship across the sea 

to Japanese labor. Let us hope that it will be grasped. 



We often wonder why very clever people pay so little atten- 
tion to their exteriors, and why people with empty heads turn them- 
selves out so smartly. 



-One would have thought the Irish had had enough of war 



during the late great slaughter, without butchering each other as they 
are now doing. 



Ladies are showing their limbs to an astonishing degree these 

days. But we cannot find anything shocking in it, unless the said 
limbs are ugly! 



The boom in oil wells in the Southern States leads us to 

hope that we will not have to go to war with Mexico after all, much 
as Hearst wants us to. 



Vineyardists are planting grapes instead of pulling them up. 

since prohibition, and finding a wonderful profit in grape juice. 
Well, "it's an ill wind," etc. 



We are paying two cents a pound for dirt found in potato 

sacks, according to a report by the Chicago City Bureau of Foods. 
What next will we be charged for? 



Mose Gibson, the negro who has confessed to ten murders, 

says he never traveled with a pal or a gun. He evidently believed 
that "he murders the fastest, who murders alone." 



If it will take $600,000,000 to finance American railways this 

year, think what we would have been taxed lo make up this appro- 
priation, if Uncle Sam still owned them! 



And now we are having a little Russian war right in San 

Francisco bay! And like most Russian happenings, I cannot find 
head nor tail of the story, nor any excuse for its having happened. 



The trouble in the Bedford Hills Reformatory for women. 

where the inmates attacked the State troops, shows that we could 
perhaps get up a women's army as well as Russia. 



And now we have the suffragette cow! Mrs. Geo. Bass, 

chairman of the Democratic Womon's Committee, distressed at her 
Dolly's nervousness because of flies, fashioned pantalettes of burlap 
for her, and Madam Cow has donned them! 



At last the schools are eliminating dead languages. Greek 

is not so necessary, so A. C. Olney, State commissioner, says, as the 
acquisition of modern languages. German is barred altogether. 
May it, also, soon be considered a dead language! 



Collector of Customs J. 0. Davis rebelled at the thought of 

two "elephants on his hands," until he found that the smuggled 
animals were ebony souvenirs from the Orient, about four inches 
Ion?. 



That was a very chivalrous road agent who held up three 

coaches near Merced, and then refused to rob the one loaded with 
Boy Scouts. The hold-up profiteers of today are quite willing to rob 
even babies. 



Mr. Franklin Roosevelt is so sure of his new job that he has 

resigned as assistant secretary of the Navy. He believes in being 
"off with the old love, before he is on with the new." Still, the new 
love may not materialize. Franklin. 



— — The League of Nations has been signed by twenty-seven 
different governments, and has been in full force and effect for more 
than a year. In the face of the fact that war has been raging in 
Europe during all that time, it would seem that the League of Peace 
has not so far justified its existence. 



Robert Hyde, a Pittsburg chemist, has promised to produce 

sugar from sawdust at a cost of two cents a pound. Not long ago a 
large warehouse near Fresno, stuffed as full of sugar as it would 
hold, was burned. There are more warehouses all over the country 
just as well packed with sugar. We. the profiteered public, wonder 
dumbly why such Germanic measures as Mr. Hyde's, are necessary? 



About seventeen jitneys on their way to the ferry, a string 

of tiucks, four street cars, a donkey engine emitting volumes of 
blinding black smoke, several men throwing gravel in one's face, — I 
stood appalled at the crossing. And then, something more startling 
appeared, a khaki brown figure to clear the way, — was it really a 
traffic cop at the corner of Fourth and Mission streets 



There could not be too harsh punishment for the clerks in 

the War Risk Bureau, who have defrauded our disabled veterans of 
their rightful claims, and spent the money in "joy rides." Certainly 
crimes of this sort are more to be condemned than the mild 
expressions of disapproval against the espionage act which some of 
our citizens indulged in during the war. and for which they were 
sentenced to heavy terms of imprisonment. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 31, 1920 



Editorial 



Webster is wrong. According to this 

Lo, the Poor Editor! misguided and mistaken elucidator, an 

editor is "one who superintends, revises, or 

prepares a literary work for publication. One who conducts a 

newspaper, magazine, etc." 

I think I can interpret the word "editor" much more satisfactorily, 
much more feelingly, I might say, as I belong to the category of these 
despitefully used and unfortunate species of human beings myself. 
An editor, as far as I can discover through painful experience, is 
one "who is superintended, revised, or prepared for publication, or 
annihilation. One who is conducted by a newspaper, magazine, etc." 

When I was still in my romantic teens and pigtails, it was my 
fjearest ambition to one day sit at a desk all my own, and "assuming 
a virtue which I had not got" — wisdom — reject or accept innumer- 
able manuscripts; in the meantime directing a retinue of faithful 
and inspired literary luminaries! My word would be inexorable! 
Once it went forth, there could be no deviation! Like the shot 
that was fired at — Bunker Hill, wasn't it? "it would echo round 
the world." 

I would — of course — have some great motive for my 
transcendental publication, some worthy conception for its existence. 
It would (preferably) take up and further the cause of the 
oppressed working classes, — the poor creatures under the heel of 
Capitalism! It would be a power in the land; tyrants, kings, 
captains of industry would tremble at my omniscient conclusions! 
In my perplexity, I would mount my "Pegasus, and ride him faster 
than the winds of heaven up many a Parnassian peak, and return 
triumphant with its solution! 

Alas! — 

The ordinary editor is a poor, cancrine (isn't that a nice new 
word? it means "crab-like") apologetic, misused, despicable 
creature. 

He has a desk, somewhere in a corner, out of the way of the 
more important officials; if he has any wisdom, it is not visible to the 
casual eye; the admiring members of his staff are only conspicuous 
by their absence; his opinions, — ah, where and what are they? 
Does he really possess any? And if he does, he must eventually 
and with much vain contention, dispossess himself of them. 

The successful editor should be an adept in side-stepping, an 
expert in the gentle art of compromise. Evasion should be his 
middle name. He is told to put more "ginger" into what he writes, 
and if he does, he finds it is not the right brand. He is afraid to 
step forward for fear of treading on the toes of some well-paying 
advertiser, and equally afraid of stepping back because he may 
walk on the feet of the press-man, for whom he has a very brotherly 
but wholly unsuspected sympathy. 

His most cherished enthusiasms are wet-blanketed with sickening 
regularity, until even Hope, which we are told "rises eternal in the 
human breast," fails to rise, after a while, at the most attractive 
bait, and sinks back into deadly apathy! He is expected to praise 
what he dislikes, and condemn what he admires. He is expected 
to think up some original scheme for making his (?) publication 
unique, and if he succeeds, he discovers that his especial kind of 
originality is too original, and besides, costs too much! 

If his soul (has he a soul?) swells with the ambition to succor 
the oppressed working classes, and drag them from under the iron 
heel of Capitalism, he is informed that Labor is no longer the under 
dog. but has poor, ill-treated and misunderstood Capital prone on 
the ground, and is now standing with the heel of his twenty-five 
dollar shoe on long-suffering Capital's neck! As for kings! Kings 
are pawns ! 



And Pegasus? Poor, old hobbled nag! Would Medusa herself 
recognize him? Does he ever know the joy and exhilaration of a 
"free rein?" Will he ever again breathe the winds of Heaven? 
Smell the wild, sweet odors of the high places? Fly in harmony 
with his rider? 

Spurred on, and then dragged back, eager to soar, but forced 
to follow hard and stony paths, Heaven-born, earth-bound, patient, 
plodding Pegasus! 

Editors? The ordinary editor is a poor, crab-like, despicable 
creature. (And the strangest thing of all is, that we inconsistent 
worms all really like our work, and some of us even like our 
publishers! ) 



There does not seem to be anything very hazardous 
A Silly Strike about the cutting up of animals in a meat shop. A 

man who takes his life in his hands every day at his 
work, can hardly be too highly paid, in my opinion. Men who swing 
out on great steel beams, hundreds of feet above the street; men 
who risk annihilation by gas and fire in mines thousands of feet 
below the earth, — men who sweat in stoke holes of steamers, men 
who work in furnaces. But labor in a meat market is rather a 
tame and placid, though possibly disagreeable existence, and honestly 
I don't see why these workers should receive $50 a week for their 
services, as they are demanding in the Alameda county butchers' 
strike, which is still on. Also, it seems to me that they are playing 
into the hands of their enemies, when one reads that there is great 
activity now in the Chinese meat markets, which the master butchers 
have combatted for so long, — not only in this trying to benefit them- 
selves, but also their employees. It has been stated that one-third of 
the union men have been kept out of employment because of the 
competition of the Chinese. The master butchers "stood in" to help 
the workers. Now the men walk out, and so to speak, butcher their 
own cause. 



Those of us who have objected to the hard arid fast 
Surreptitious enforcement of the prohibition laws have pointed over 
Drinking and over again to the fact that the reaction would 

take the form of the manufacture of drinks that 
would do more harm in many cases than the evils which it was 
desired to prohibit. But these arguments have always been met by 
an incredulity on the part of the fanatics of the law. Now it is 
admitted that vast quantities of such liquors are being made 
surreptitiously and that the knowledge of the manufacture of 
alcoholic drinks which was formerly confined to a few, has spread 
over the whole country. 

This would be bad enough if confined to the people whose 
intelligence and education are sufficient to restrain them in the use 
of what, after all, are very crude and often very dangerous drugs, 
for home made liquors are notoriously bad in quality, but the 
knowledge is now spreading fast among ignorant and backward 
people with the result that the peace is more and more threatened 
and actual harm occurs to those who are indulging in this surrep- 
titious manufacture and drinking. We have heard rumors as to its 
spread among our own negro population which gives rise to grave 
apprehensions of mischief. Further afield it is still worse. Thus 
the amount of so-called illicit drunkenness among the Hawaiians is 
becoming a grave menace to the well being of the islands and the 
authorities are seeking the active co-operation of the Federal 
Government in putting it down. It is said that women make large 
quantities of such liquor while the men of the family are away at 
work and that the effect on public morals is becoming very marked. 

There can be little doubt that the saloon, which was bad enough 
and which one would not wish to see restored, is light compared with 
this home drinking with all its possibilities of domestic debauchery 
and hidden vice. 



July 31, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



July 30th will be either the close of the old 
The Russian Armistice war, the actual close (for all that has 
happened since the armistice, has been but 
the perturbation caused by the great disaster, and not peace in any 
real sense) or it will be the beginning of a new war, compared with 
which the old was but a disturbance of a superficial sort and limited 
in its scope. Either the Russians will consent to a peace which will 
enable the Allies to make good their policy of the creation of an 
independent Poland or they will challenge the whole world to a 
conflict which will complete the ruin caused by the last war. For it 
is inconceivable that civilization as we know it can survive the 
onslaught which a new struggle on a scale so great must necessitate. 

There is on the one hand every reason to suppose that the present 
Russian government desires peace for the sake at least of its own 
rehabilitation, and that it will at least allow a sufficient time for 
recuperation before recommencing any struggle to impose its peculiar 
views upon the rest of mankind. But we cannot be sure of this, for 
the condition of Russia is such that its people can make war with 
less strain than other peoples at the present. It is not in any sense 
an industrial country, but js a country of farmers with large families, 
and as far as farming is concerned there is little doubt that the 
Russians can raise large armies and fight over great stretches of 
country without any terrible impairment of their economic position. 
That is proved by the fact that after being utterly dislocated, they 
have in three years raised an army which is three millions strong and 
seems at least to be very capable. The same argument applies also 
to those Eastern countries with whom Russia is now more or less 
intimately allied, and who have the same phenomena of agriculture 
and prolificness. 

On the other hand it is clear that no industrial country can afford 
for any great length of time to keep these armies in the held and 
that, as was seen in the case of Germany, industrial dislocation to 
such countries means unbearable privation and ultimate ruin. 

Still it cannot be imagined that progressive industrial countries can 
submit to the domination of backward and ignorant races. To do so 
would be to abdicate all the advantages of culture and progress, 
which such progressiveness and culture have brought. So that unless 
the Russians are willing to allow peace in the borders of their 
neighbors, and to refrain from those activities which constantly 
threaten the very existence of the industrial States, peace is 
impossible. The matter will have to be put to the test and we shall 
be face to face with a condition which approximates (he historical 
Mohammedan incursion. What that would imply can only be faintly 
hinted. Suffice it to say that it would imperil all that man has gained 
in the last thousand years and even more. So that we look to the 
conferences beginning July 30th with mingled hope and alarm. 



We read of Roman augurs and of divination of 
The Reign of entrails, and the settlement of grave national matters 
Superstition by means of the behavior of the lower animals under 

certain conditions. And we giggle. We study the 
Middle Ages and are appalled at the fatuity of great men who place 
their confidence in the prognostications of so-called sages who under- 
took to determine the conduct of human affairs from the conjunction 
of the planets or the peculiarities of atmospheric phenomena at 
certain times. And we say with a sigh of relief that mankind has at 
all events climbed a step or two in the path upward. 

Then we pick up the daily paper and find that the same old 
habits persist and that men will still seek to find a solution of their 
problems in easier and more dramatic ways than the use of 
observation and the steady development of industry and thought will 
allow. Just as always, the human tries to shirk labor and will gladly 
find any excuse to avoid the exercise of the bodily and mental 
powers with which he has been endowed by Providence, or which 
has assembled themselves into his make-up by the process of 
evolutionary growth. 



For example, we find that in one case it is gravely proposed to 
put off the interpretation of the contents of a will until the person 
who has made the will and is now numbered with the departed, may 
return and explain to some medium or other, who will charge a fee 
for services, just what he did mean when he penned the cryptic 
words. In the famous Elwell mystery in New York it is also seriously 
proclaimed that the missing automatic pistol be discovered by means 
of the ouija board. Scores of ouija communications have been 
received by the district attorney who is going to have them all read. 
The recent teachings of men like Lodge and Doyle have had their 
effects also and there never was a time when superstitious imagin- 
ings with regard to the dead ran more fiercely rampant than they 
do today. 

It would seem as if there lay back of the human mind, in subcon- 
sciousness as it were, a whole mass of accreted superstitions that 
have belonged to the race from its earliest history and as if the 
process of time and the development of man were of little effect in 
demolishing this pile of refuse. But whenever some great emotional 
occurrence, like the war, which stirs the whole personality and which 
moves the depths of being has made its appearance, then this mass 
comes to life again. But whatever may be the reason, the fact is 
there that at the end of an epoch which has been more distinguished 
than any other for the use of the scientific method and the applica- 
tions of logical principles to the discovery of phenomena, superstition 
still lifts its ridiculous head and laughs at the accomplishments of 
man. 



We read everywhere of the aggression of the British 
The Vigor of politicians and that the governing class of the tight 
the British little island has seized and is in control of more than 

a quarter of the world's surface, that Britain has 
profiteered from the war and that their commerce is likely to develop 
to an inordinate extent. We also hear that she is in possession of 
the coming oil supply, that her irrigation projects will put her in 
control of the rubber plantations and in short that her arms stretch 
out like the weaving tentacles of a sea monster to envelop the 
world. 

All that by the way. Britain may be a cormorant state, let us 
admit it for the sake of argument. Her treatment of the Indians 
may be indefensible. We may postulate that also for the sake of 
argument; though we may say in passing that no country in the 
world ever placed at the disposal of the vanquished the ability and 
altruism which the British governing class has shown in that very 
matter of India. Her treatment of Egypt may be violative of all law 
and decent precedent, but all the same the Egyptian in the course 
of thirty years has under British lule risen from a state of abject 
and miserable slavery in which he was robbed and bastinadoed at 
the whim of his masters, to a peasant proprietor, owning his own 
land and very likely taxed, and with an irrigation system at his 
control which few peoples in ancient or modern times have ever had 
given to them. Then, of course, there is Ireland. But who can speak 
of Ireland? But all this is not what we wanted to talk about. Here 
is a little people of forty millions. They have lost in a long and 
bloody war. which they were under no material necessity to take 
part in. a quarter of the young men of a whole generation. 
One-quarter of their effecti\e youth is gone. 

We should expect to see that nation fall back for a time at least 
exhausted and take the recuperation which would seem to be not 
only essential but absolutely unavoidable. We should expect to hear 
of diminished production, of a falling off in the power and force of 
such a people and at least a relative diminution of their output as 
compared with that of nations which have not had to face such a 
strain. 

But such is far from being the case. We find that British ship- 
building is outstripping our own by leaps and bounds, that they are 

(Continued to Page 7) 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 31, 1920 



Town Crier 

Hear the Crier: Who the Devil Art Thou? 

One That Will Pla\, the Devil, Sir, With You. 

The gentleman who suicided from an eleven story building, 

in San Francisco the other day, emphasizes the necessity for accident 
insurance by all pedestrians. Hundreds of windows, each one a 
menace, rise for blocks one above the other, along our down-town 
thoroughfares, and the wonder is that the dense throng of humanity 
succeeds in daily wriggling its way to and fro without getting its 
head broken. In the instance referred to, it was only the thought- 
fulness and presence of mind of the suicide, who bounced about on 
the telephone wires and thus attracted attenion to his spectacular 
descent, that saved some of those passing from certain death. 



The daily record of accidents proves the menace of the 

automobile to be increasing. It is because of God's especial 
goodness that life is at all possible in or out of the automobile. The 
sweet breath of the Pacific passing over and purifying all in its 
passage negatives the fetid exhalation of a rotten sewerage; the 
sunshine, the flowers, the ocean, mountains and blue skies, the 
everything in nature that makes life worth living, instead of 
accentuating, act as a veil between the good pious minded and the 
offensive wretchedness of a rotten city government. The churches, 
ministers, the editors, and other righteous things, live and prosper 
despite the lawless; while overhead wires, unsafe theatres, carbon 
monoxide and kindred outrages flourish, despite the law. I am 
tempted to call for a hymn. 



The raisin is a toothsome, succulent vegetable, and its Mecca 

is Fresno. Long years since, the Fresno swales of alkali dust, that 
blossom like the rose under irrigation, developed a strong partiality 
for the raisin grape. Raisins, the partially and scientifically dried 
product of the grape, became highly popular and, when by means of 
co-operation under a certain Don Theo. Kearney, the price doubled 
and trebled, the cracker and native lifted up their voice in praise. 
Some of the natives went to Paris on their profits, and some bought 
automobiles, and ever since the business has prospered. But the 
business was slightly overdone. The price was put up so high that 
consumption decreased and for a time the business languished. 
Now, however, there is a revival. The grapes upon the vines are 
selling for more than the raisins ever did. The reason? There is a 
strict law against manufacturing alcoholic beverages from dried 
grapes. Hence the unprecedented demand for dried grapes for this 
purpose. 



We are a difficult people to satisfy. At present the complaint 

is "under production, high wages and prices that touch the sky." 
Fifteen years ago a general malediction was being launched at fate 
and the Government in consequence of over-production, large 
numbers of operators out of employment, short wheat crops, low 
wages, idle mills, a drop in the price of lumber — in fact, Jeremiah 
would have written lamentations to fill the needs of those gentlemen 
had he been on earth with his literary bureau in full swing. All the 
time in these United States, people are eating, sleeping and enjoying 
themselves; enterprises of great pith and moment go forward on all 
sides; the strides of industry, the hum of busy machinery. Millions 
are being invested in new industries and the country is being made 
safe for decent people by the shipment of undesirables back to their 
native lairs. These are all causes for rejoicing and present a lesson 
both for the short-sighted mortal to whom one knock-down is a 
defeat, and to the student of affairs who will recognize that some 
good is in everything, and that out of the nettle danger, may be 
plucked the flower, safety. 



Far be it from me to deride or discourage anything to make 

the Call and Bulletin hate one another less ardently than they now 
do, but I am convinced that the practice, indulged by each, of so 
frankly and tiuthfully revealing the knowledge one has of the 
other's character and reputation, not only serves to give undesirable 
prominence to both, but disturbs the general belief in the divine 
right of editors to censure, advise, commend and otherwise stick 
their severally assembled noses into the affairs of the general public. 
It is by the kindest impulse that I am moved to advise caution in 
this matter. There is much wisdom in the adage that all truths 
should not be told at all times. 



Speaking of the danger of fire arising from the careless use 

of matches an authority says: "A blow or friction under the heel, 
or the bite of a cockroach will set off one of these red-headed 
spitfires." The quality sold on the Coast may sometimes be induced 
to take fire by friction against a piece of coarse sandpaper or by 
holding the decorated extremity in familiar juxtaposition to a lighted 
gas jet. By employing the latter method the head is not so likely 
to fly off and sizzle a hole in one's cuticle or the carpet and is to be 
especially preferred by people affected with profanity or a morbid 
condition of the heart. These means are mentioned for the benefit 
of those who may, on occasion, suffer the embarrassment of finding 
themselves away from home on a dark night without their 
cockroach. 



Clarence M. Smith is an underwriter. Secundus, he is a 

banker. Above all, he is a good fellow. Last winter, looking out 
from his palatial country residence over the parched valley, he said 
to the local parsons, "Pray for rain; pray with all your might and 
main, and if you pray four inches of rain I will pay off all your 
church debts." Now it was a cinch for the bank either way. If it 
rained, the farmers would pay off their mortgages, or at least 
interest; if it did not, the bank would take the farms and own the 
whole works. However, the following night the rain gauge and the 
prayer gauge met, and four inches were recorded. That is why this 
item should have been headed: "In Hell and How to Get Out," for 
when a banker, and especially a country banker, is called, either by 
Providence or a pat flush, then indeed, as Senator Hiram Johnson 
said to Editor William Hearst regarding the uncertainty of con- 
ventions, "This is Hell." 



-Under the caption, "Does It Pay?" a contemporary asks 



whether it pays to fight corrupt or inefficient State commissioners, or 
whether it is better to endure them in silence, submit to their 
extortion, or limit hostilities to "curses not loud but deep" as Macbeth 
has it. There can be no question — no two opinions in this matter. 
It pays to fight always against a wrong. As a matter of principle no 
business activity should submit to unjust rulings. Temporary 
advantage may be gained by acquiescence in the extortionate 
demands of thick-skulled commissioners, but in the end it pays to 
fight. The right thing is always the right thing. There is small 
wisdom in temporizing. 



It is reassuring to be told by the American Chamber of 

Commence in London that "Great Britain is neither bankrupt nor 
anywhere near it." With the balance of trade restored between 
Great Britain and the world, as it soon will be, the value of the 
sovereign will take its former place as the standard of world currency 
with a suddenness that will be little less than demoralizing to the 
money speculators of Wall Street. 



Too bad more auto accidents cannot be averted by a quick 

wit like Mr. Colbert's! In the incident down the peninsula, he ran 
his machine behind a woman's stalled car, and pushed it off the 
track of an on-coming train. 



July 31, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



The Gray Cat's Work 

By Eleanore F. Lewys-Ross. 



[Editor's note: The "News Letter" during the next few months will 
publish a series of short stories by Eleanore F. Lewys-Ross. These stories 
appeared in both the "Overland Monthly" and "News Letter" several years 
ago. and were compared at that time to the writings of Poe.J 



A shadow crept behind the man, but when he paused and 
glanced backward, it disappeared under the wall that divided the 
two gardens. 

The dim light glimmering from one of the upper windows of 
the flat told Annersley that his wife had waited up for him. 

A helpless sort of rage filled him at sight of it. Was there 
anything, he thought, more tiresome, hopeless, sickening, than the 
knowledge that the person you have ceased to love still loves you ? 
Surely nothing except, perhaps, the knowledge that you are legally 
tied to such a person, when you are madly infatuated with some- 
one else. 

Annersley at last succeeded in fitting his latch key into the lock 
(after many fruitless attempts), and stumbled up the stairs. He 
did not see the gray form that slipped in after him, and stationed 
itself in a huddled heap at the top of the long stairs. He only saw, 
as he passed into the lamp-lighted sitting-room the face and form 
of the woman he had married, and contrasted them mentally with 
the face and form of the woman he had just left. 

Her gray hair had once been that soft-shaded bronze that we 
seldom see, except in pictures, and her glowing skin had faded into 
a grayish neutral shade like her hair. She moved in a quiet, 
depressed, stealthy way, and reminded one of soft gray velvet, only 
with a latent vibrant life in it; suppressed, dull, morose, on the 
surface, but behind all this the power that never slept; that never 
forgot; the power that would one day spring! 

And out of all this gray softness, two strange, greenish-yellow 
eyes, with yellow glints in them, the only gleam of color in the dull 
monotone of her appearance. 

She glanced up and smiled as her husband entered the room, but 
her smile was sad, and half suppressed, seemingly like her nature. 
Her husband passed on, with simply: "Why do you wait up for 
me, Enid?" and closed his bedroom door after him. 

From the open window the night breeze stole in, with a faint 
reminder of flowers on its breath. The woman dropped her head 
on her arms. The perfumed wind grew stronger, until it swayed the 
lace curtains back and forth, and flickered the yellow-shaded lamp 
that stood near by. It blew her silky wisps of hair over the 
dreamer's slim fair arms, and caressed her long throat like cool, 
soft hands. 

It brought her, for one brief, delicious moment, to a green, 
sheltered nook near the country road, that wound in and out among 
the hills like a pale ribbon. Over her, the yellow jasmine blossoms 
dropped their soft petals on the golden brown hair. But she was 
not alone, as now. Some one's dark head was dangerously near 
her bright one. and two eager hands grasped her's. and a trembling 
mouth begged her to "tell him if she really loved him ?" 

The man flung open the window and let the moonlight stream in. 
He was back again in imagination in the cozy little dressing room 
ol his inamorata. The latter sat on a table near him. swinging her 
limbs (such pretty limbs they were, as roundly turned out as the 
legs of a piano!) and holding a cigarette between two full red 
lips. Her figure was perhaps a little too stout for what an artist's 
eye would consider real beauty, but less weight would mean to 
Cecelia a more limited diet, and such a proceeding as limiting her 



appetites or desires in any way would have appeared as perfectly 
ridiculous and unnecessary to the little dancer. 

Life was a picnic, or a jolly good play. "Eat, drink and be 
merry, for tomorrow," the curtain drops! 

The empty rooms struck a chill to Annersley 's heart as he passed 
through them. There was the inevitable little note on his .pin 
cushion, signed simply "Enid." 

"Well, I might have known it would come sooner or later," he 
thought, wearily; "she must have found it out some way or other. 
Trust these quiet women for that. At all events, I have the 
satisfaction of knowing that she went alone." And he dropped into 
a chair and laughed mirthlessly. 

Something on the floor caught his eye. A half burned sheet of 
note-paper, which the draught from the open door had blown onto 
the carpet. 

The hand-writing was strangely familiar. And over there, near 
the bureau, lay a man's half-worn glove. 

The pretty little buffet in the oak-paneled dining-room was 
always well stocked. "My dear," a well-meaning old lady had once 
said to Enid, just before the latter's marriage, "better let your 
husband have all he wants at home, than have him go elsewhere 
for it. They will drink, the best of them!" 

And so, with the help of the friendly buffet, Annersley had 
managed to make himself royally drunk. 

He lay on her bed, breathing heavily, with a little knot of ribbon 
she had worn clasped to his breast. 

The house was still as Death itself. Even the distracting pianist 

in the flat below had ceased murdering Etude No and was in the 

arms of Morpheus. So the dark form that crept up the stairs 
steathily, along the empty hall, with its moonbeam flecked carpet, 
and through the open door, had nothing to fear from anything 
human. 

The sleeping man was not conscious of the soft jar of the bed, 
as something lithe and agile sprang on it. Only, as that something 
crept closer to his open mouth, his breathing became fainter and 
more irregular until it ceased altogether. 

The dim light of dawn, touching vaguely all the familiar objects 
in the room, fell upon the quiet figure on the bed, on the hands 
still clasping the little knot of ribbon over the cold heart, and threw 
a more ghastly meaning over the convulsed face. 

For the gray cat had done its work. 

THE VIGOR OF THE BRITISH 

(Continued from Page 5) 

building nearly two million more Ions than we. this year, that their 
export trade is also developing to a degree unheard of. that in spite 
of labor troubles and all the disturbance inseparable from the 
termination of such a conflict, they are vastly increasing their manu- 
facturing development; that the conversion of war material 
manufactories into machinery for rommercial products has pro- 
ceeded apace and that in spite of all this their imperial machinery is 
still intact. Whence comes that terrific vitality which this race and 
people possess? Out of those quiet dales and moors and distant 
; nd remote little hamlets and villages there flows an unceasing stream 
of valiant and energetic blood. It has come from them for centuries 
and in spite of all the afflictions of the modern age it seems to be 
inexhaustible. Nothing was ever like it in history. What is this 
secret of this luxuriance of vital energy? 



And now army men are to be barred from taking any action 

in politics! The freedom of America is becoming a joke. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 31. 1920 



Gossip of Society 



The Menlo Park Country club in Ather- 
lon was the scene on Thursday, July 22, of 
many delightful informal luncheons on the 
veranda preceding the weekly golf tourna- 
ment. Among those seen lunching there 
were: Mesdames Charles McCormick. Alex- 
ander Hamilton, Charles Warren Hunt, 
Harold Casey, Richard JVlulcahy. George 
Lyman, De Lancy Lewis, Evan Williams. 
Ernest Stent, William Henry Pool, William 
H. Taylor, Jr., Augustus laylor, Arthur 
Hooper, Clinton La Montagne. Covington 
Pringle; Misses Mary Elena Macondray, 
Aileen Mcintosh, Edna Taylor, Mary Emma 
Flood, Gertrude Clark. 

Mrs. Walker Kamm, with her small 
daughter, is visiting her mother, Mrs. Edward 
Roberts, in Los Angeles. 

On Tuesday, July 20, Mrs. Kirby Critten- 
den, Miss Maude Fay and Miss Louise Boyd 
left San Rafael on a motor trip, planning to 
stop at Lake Tahoe and other resorts en 
route. They will return early in August. 

Alexander T. Vogelsang, first assistant 
secretary of the interior, Washington, D. C, 
arrived from the East Monday and registered 
at the Palace hotel. 

The event of the celebration in honor of 
the 1500 midshipmen and several hundred 
naval reserve men who arrived on the 22d 
with the Atlantic squadron on a practice 
cruise of the Pacific waters, a dance was 
given at the Civic Auditorium. Thornwell 
Mullally was in charge of the general enter- 
tainment committee. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Bothin have closed 
their Ross Valley home and gone South, 
where they will be guests at the Ambassador. 

Mrs. John Rogers Clark was luncheon 
hostess Monday at her home on Broadway, 
when she entertained for Mrs. Clarence 
Smith, who has recently returned from the 
Orient. Those asked to meet the guest of 
honor were: Mesdames Frank P. Deering, 
Samuel Monsarrat, Harry Jenkins, John B. 
Wright, William Matson, Ira Pierce, K. 0. 
Harron, J. J. Gartenlaub, Van Dyke Johns, 
Eugene Freeman. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Pike, who are passing 
the summer months in Burlingame, enter- 
tained informally at dinner last week. Their 
guests included: Messrs. and Mesdames 
George Barr Baker, Dr. and Mrs. Alanson 
Weeks, C. K. Belknap. 

Two extensively entertained visitors in 
California are Mrs. William Scaife and 
her brother, Jerome Hill, of Pittsburg, Pa. 
They are visiting their brother-in-law and 
sister, Mr. and Mrs. William S. Kuhn, at 
their home in Burlingame. Mr. and Mrs. 



Kuhn have been entertaining at a series of 
informal affairs in honor of the visitors. 

Mrs. Homer King and her daughters, Miss 
Genevieve and Miss Hazel King, are among 
the many motoring parties who are passing 
a few days in the high Sierra at Huntington 
Lodge, Huntington Lake. 

Miss Marion Maroney, Miss Virginia Loop 
and Miss Rosario Moran, three attractive 
San Francisco girls, are visiting in Los 
Angeles and are being extensively enter- 
tained. 

Mrs. Conde Nast and her son, Condert 
Nasi, are at the Fairmont hotel. Mrs. Nast 
and her son are making an extended tour of 
the United States and will be here a few 
days. 

Mrs. Andrew Werner Lawson motored to 
King Mountain this week with a party of 
guests. Miss Elizabeth Fee is her house 
guest and others in the party were Mesdames 
Charles Warren Hunt. Harold Casey, Van 
Leer Kirkman. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Ghirardelli and Miss 
Elva and Miss Juanita Ghirardelli are at 
Catalina, as is Miss Juanita Ghirardelli's 
fiance, Harry Hush Magee, Jr.. the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Magee of Oakland. 

Raymond and Gordon Armsby are ex- 
pected home next week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence McCreary (Ara- 
bella Schwerin) have returned to California 
and are at the Rennie Pierre Schwerin home 
in El Cerrito. Mr. and Mrs. McCreery re- 
turned on Monday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Vogelsang, who 
are visiting here, were the guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Gaillard Stoney at a dinner on Monday 
evening. 

Mrs. Florence Porter Pfingst, who has 
been visiting with friends in Los Angeles, has 
gone to Santa Barbara to be a guest at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. George Edward 
Coleman. 

Malcolm Whitman is expected next week 
from New York to join his family in Burlin- 
game. After a month or six weeks in Cali- 
fornia the family will return to their home in 
the East. Miss Barbara Harrison, who is 
passing the summer with Mrs. Whitman, will 
return to school in New York in September. 

Miss Marie Louise Baldwin is visiting 
friends at East Hampton, Long Island, and 
has set no date for her return. She is being 
entertained extensively by her many friends 
in the East. 

Mrs. Hugh Porter was among the many 
women who entertained at a small luncheon 
at the Hotel St. Francis Monday afternoon. 

Comtesse de Mailly Chalon has returned 



from the South after a visit in Santa Bar- 
bara, having motored down with her mother, 
Mrs. P. Morbio. 

Mrs. John H. Williams was hostess at a 
delightful tea which she gave at her home on 
Filbert street last week in honor of a number 
of her friends who are visiting in San Fran- 
cisco, among them having been: Mesdames 
William D. Stephens, Irving Wright, Hancock 
Banning. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Lilley were hosts 
at an informal dinner at their home in Ross 
on Tuesday evening, July 20. when they 
entertained as their guests Messrs. and 
Mesdames George Kelham, Kenneth R. 
Kingsbury, Seward B. McNear. 

Miss Marian Baker, who recently returned 
from an Eastern visit, has joined her mother, 
Mrs. Edward Bosqui, at the Bosqui ranch in 
the Santa Cruz mountains. 

Mrs. Alexander Rutherford returned on 
Friday, the 23d, from the East, where she 
has been visiting her mother for the past few 
weeks. 

Miss Betty and Miss Elena Folger were 
hostesses Tuesday evening, July 20, at a de- 
lightfully informal Hawaiian supper and 
dance. Most of the guests were members of 
the younger married set, and among them 
were: Messrs. and Mesdames Algernon 
Gibson. William Mayo Newhall, Jr. Miss 
Dorothy Johnston of St. Louis; Messrs. 
Tallant Tubbs. Leroy Nickel, Cyril McNear. 

Mrs. Frederick Sharon and Mrs. James B. 
Haggin have returned from Santa Barbara. 
Prior to their departure Mrs. Sharon and 
Mrs. Haggin were hostesses at a luncheon 
which they gave at El Mirasol. 

Judge and Mrs. James Beatty, who passed 
the early summer in Washington, D. C have 
arrived in San Francisco and are at the 
Cecil hotel. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clemens Horst and their 
daughters, the Misses Helen, Hazel and 
Beatrice Horst, are at Tahoe for the summer. 

Miss Maye Coiburn left Friday, the 23d. 



PALACE HOTEL 

for 

Service 
atisfaction 
miles 

A WONDERFULLY EFFECTIVE 
COMBINATION 

Management of 

HALSEY E. MANWARING 



July 31. 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



for Novate where she was the week-end 
guest of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Shaw at their 
ranch. 

Miss Vere de Vere Adams passed last 
week-end in Santa Barbara. 

Miss Hildreth Meiere, who has been a 
guest at the home of her brother-in-law and 
sister, Mr. and Mrs. Wilder Bowers, since her 
arrival in California from New York, left 
July 23 for Los Altos, where she is visiting 
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest 
Meiere, for the rest of the season. 

Mrs. Francisco Duenas, with her 
daughters, the Misses Corralla, Maria and 
Edelmira Duenas, has given up her apart- 
ments at the Palace Hotel and gone to 
Santa Barbara to pass the rest of the season 
at the Ambassador hotel. 

Mrs. J. Downey Harvey, accompanied by 
Mrs. Jane Cooper, will return next week 
from Saratoga where they have been visiting 
4or the past two weeks. 

Mrs. Ralph T. Zane, who is visiting her 
aunt, Mrs. J. W. Wilson, in San Diego, is 
being constantly entertained. 

Mrs. Anna Voorhies Bishop entertained 
informally at luncheon at her home on Tues- 
day, the 20th inst. 

Miss Kathleen Finnegan has taken a cot- 
tage in Santa Barbara for the season, with 
plans to return to her home in San Mateo in 
November. Miss Alice Finnegan is visiting 
in Los Angeles and will return early in the 
winter. 

Mrs. Talbot C. Walker has returned to her 
home in Santa Barbara after a short visit 
in town as the guest of her mother-in-law, 
Mrs. Cyrus Walker. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cyril Tobin have relumed 
to Burlingame after a visit with friends in 
Monterey. 

Mrs. Arthur Chesebrough is visiting her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Mayo New- 
hall, in Burlingame. 

Announcement of the marriage in New 
York of Miss Noel Haskins and Frederick 
Murphy has been made. I he wedding was a 
simple affair, celebrated on June 22 in the 
presence of a small circle of relatives and 
friends. I he bride, who is a sister of Mrs. 
Cyril Tobin. visited here last summer and has 
many relatives and a host ol hiends in 
California. 

Mrs. Walter Bliss of New York and Mon- 
leciio is visiting in San Francisco for a short 
time and is staying at the Fairmont hotel. 

Mrs. George Howard and Mr. and Mrs. 
George Dana are visiting in Yosemile. 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel C. Jackling, accom- 
panied by Dr. and Mrs. Herbert Allen, left 
Saturday, the 24th. by motor for Lake 
Tahoc. where they joined Dr. and Mrs. Her- 
bert Moflitt for two weeks or more. 

The friends of Miss Jean Boyd are look- 
ing forward with interest to her return, about 
August 6, from the East, where she has been 
lor the past few months. Miss Boyd will join 



her parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Boyd, and 
her sister, Miss Cynthia Boyd, at their at- 
tractive home in San Rafael. 

Mrs. Frederick Sharon entertained guests 
at tea at the Palace hotel on Saturday after- 
noon, July 24. 

Mrs. Alfred Hammersmith invited a few 
of her friends to luncheon Monday afternoon 
at her home on Octavia street. 

Mrs. Wendell P. Hammon and her little 
grandson, George Hammon Hendricks, 
motored to Santa Barbara last week and are 
now at the Ambassador for the summer. 

Mrs. Clement lobin has as her house guest 
her mother, Mrs. Eugene de Sabla, who has 
just returned from New York. Mrs. Tobin 
and Mrs. de Sabla are planning to pass the 
coming winter together in New York. 

Georges de Latour and his son, Georges 
de Latour, Jr., will return to California next 
month from abroad. Mrs. de Latour will 
remain in Paris for another month, returning 
here with Miss Jennie Blair. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hobart, who have 
been visiting Dr. and Mrs. Herbert Momt 
for the past few days at Tahoe, have opened 
their summer camp at Sand Harbor, near the 
lake. Miss Ruth Hobart has joined them 
for a few weeks. 

Mrs. Francis Davis Pryor returned last 
week from Monterey and is with her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Gaillard Stoney, with whom 
she will remain until the return of Com- 
mander Pryor from Honolulu. 

Mrs. Frank Ames who is summering in 
Santa Barbara, entertained a group of the 
younger set at a dinner dance which she 
gave a few evenings ago at the Santa Bar- 
bara Country club. 

Mrs. Jonathon J. Crooks presided over a 
delightful luncheon at her home in San 
Kalael on Friday afternoon, the 23rd but., 
m honor of Mrs. Patrick Calhoun. 

On Sunday afternoon last Mr. and Mrs. 
Fentriss Hill entertained in honor of Mrs. 
Scaife and her brother, when they gave a 
luncheon at the Burlingame Country club, 
those sharing the pleasure of the occasion 
were: Messrs. and Mesdames Edmunds 
Lyman. Laurence Irving Scott, William Dun- 
can. William S. Kuhn. Atholl McBean, 
Gerald Rathbone. Harry Pool; Mrs. Arthur 
Chesebrough; Mr. Stanford Gwin. 

It is a tribute to her talent as an actress, 
to her personality and to her high idealism, 
that a former Alameda girl. Rosamonde 
Joysclle, daughter of Mrs. and the late G. 
Alexander Wright, well known East bay 
residents, has been chosen for the leading 
role, that of Mary, the Virgin Mother, in the 
biblical play founded on the life of Christ 
which had its premiere in the open air audi- 
torium at Hollywood last week. 

The auditorium, which will seat 1000 
people and is a natural Greek theatre in El 
Camino Real canyon where the scenes in the 
life of the Saviour are enacted by a care- 



fully chosen cast of 200 people, some of 
wide reputation and some of whom are the 
carpenters, stone masons and laborers who 
constructed the theatre. 

The drama is called the "National 
Pilgrimage Play," and has the backing of a 
non-sectarian body of churchmen. Miss 
Joyselle was chosen through her work in the 
mission play, as one who could bring to bear 
upon the sacred role the utmost charm and 
nobility. This drama promises to become as 
great a national institution as the "Passion 
Play" of Oberammergau. 



SEEING IS BELIEVING 

He was waiting to hear the distinguished 
representative of The Society for the En- 
couragement of Birth Control. 

As she mounted the platform, he grabbed 
his hat and threaded his way out. 

"Don't go; Wait and hear her speak," 
urged the usher. "She will convince you of 
the urgent necessity of birth control." 

"I am already convinced," he replied, con- 
tinuing on his way. "I have seen the 
speaker." — Smart Set. 











Willard's 

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IT has the unique 
distinction of being 
exclusive, but not 
expensive. 

139-153 Geary Street 

San Francisco 











DR. WM. W. HOAGLAND 

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Offices. 908 Market St .Third Floor 
TELEPHONE GARFIELD 835 



Potted Plants 
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404 Market Street, San Francisco 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 31. 1920 



Guesses About America To Be Put to Test 

By W. L. George. 



Arnold Bennett endeared himself to the 
reading American public by his book, "Your 
United States." Unlike the usual Britisher, 
he found only things to admire in our 
country, and wrote in a pleasing whole- 
hearted fashion of our wonderful sky- 
scrapers, our scenery, our pretty women. 
And naturally, his volume sold well among 
us (for we all like to be praised), and left 
a pleasant taste in our mouths. 

And now comes William L. George, British 
novelist, sociologist, and ultra-modern 
thinker (who seven years ago, fired a broad- 
side of irony, conjecture and humorous 
philosophizings across our bow, in a maga- 
zine article in "Everybody's," entitled "What 
America Must Be Like"), to lecture in our 
country, and to discover if his guesses at 
America were correct. 

In this article, Mr. George said: 

"The American girl is pretty. I can 
never think of her save as pretty as a Ger- 
man, with lightness as an Italian, with refine- 
ment as an Anglo-Saxon, with vivacity. I 
never think of her as coarse-featured, spec- 
tacled, or sallow. She is always pretty and 
she is always smart; often she is elegant, 
and after a visit to Europe, always elegant. 
. . . She takes attention, gifts, love, as her 
due; she shall give charm, she shall give 
service; that is a business proposition." 

After this eulogy, he goes on to say (which 
seems rather contradictory, doesn't it?): 

"She is a harsh, gluttonous little animal, 
as beautiful as a tiger-cub . . and as gentle. 
Still, it is not for me to say she is not worthy 
of you; presumably she is, for I am inclined 
to think that every nation has the women it 
chooses and deserves. We believe that — 
A woman, a spaniel, and a walnut tree. 
The more you beat them the better they be. 
And as a result, we have charming but unin- 
telligent slaves; you have intelligent gov- 
ernors, but to my mind you are mere Frank- 
ensteins." 

Apropos of New York, this is what Mr. 
George thought that city "must be like": 

A Guess at New York 

"I look again at New York. I see nothing 
else. I cannot imagine small houses, Ameri- 
can family parties, or gardens; I suppose you 
have theatres, for you send us plays, which 
I think generally bad. (We, too, send you 
plays, and you, too, think them bad.) I 
suppose you have hotels, but my vision is 
limited to Sherry's and Delmonico's; I can 
see nothing else, not even East Side ; nobody 
has told men anything about East Side be- 
yond that it is frequented by Chinamen. I 
add the word 'steam heat,' and I have done 



with New York; it is a faint picture, the 
picture of some kind of town in the fore- 
ground of which is a Statue of Liberty; that 
is all. . . The New Yorker whom I visualize 
frightens me, but he compels my admiration; 
I see you as more vital than we are; I 
imagine you do more in the same time." 

Mr. George expects to spend five or six 
months touring this country, and finding out 
more about the modern woman, the technic 
of the novel, the marriage institution, the 
League of Nations. They cover a wide range 
of subjects, but one must expect that of a 
continental intellectual, says Mr. George. 
His forthcoming novel, "Caliban," is the 
story of "Lord Bulmer," a powerful news- 
paper publisher, who came to dominate all 
England, and who, the author says, "is 
neither Mr. Hearst, Lord Northcliffe, or 
Joseph Pulitzer, but an imaginative type of 
the super-pressman." 

Also he is trying to show what the yellow 
press means to the world, and to react 
against the foolish cries which arise from 
little highbrow circles against popular 
journalism. 

Following are some of the aphorisms of 
Mr. George's: 

"To write a novel is abominal drudgery, 
but there are hours, moments, when you 
really know what it must feel like to be a 
hen. 

"There's no place like home . . which is 
one comfort. 

"The cultivated woman is either so light 
that she does not understand when you tell 
her that you love her, or so excessive that 
she insists on eloping. 

"Life is a bad debtor. She never pays in 
full. If you're lucky she pays part of her 



debts, by installments. But if you press her 
she goes bankrupt. 

"For the Englishman there are only two 
kinds of women : the accessible undesirable, 
and the inaccessible desirable. 

"The Englishman is a little afraid of being 
happy; it makes him feel sinful." 

"Caliban" is to be brought out by Harper 
Brothers, Franklin Square, New York. 



EVERY DANCE A SOUVENIR DANCE 
AFTER THE THEATRE 

The new departure at lechau Tavern 
which consists in having every dance during 
supper and after the theatre a lucky dance is 
earning the approval of the dance-loving 
public who delight in winning the Hilson 
Toggery orders which are good for gloves, 
silk stockings and many other delightful gifts 
for milady. The gentlemen receive large 
boxes of Melachrino cigarettes. The Techau 
Tavern dance orchestra with its charming 
melodies vies for honors with the celebrated 
artists revue, which furnishes a cabaret en- 
tertainment de luxe in rapid array of colorful 
gowns, while talented artists sing the latest 
in songdom. A visit after the theatre is one 
of the best ways of passing an hour or so 
brimful of healthful pleasure. The souvenirs 
are gratuitous gifts given away free abso- 
lutely without competition. Another attract- 
ive feature is the tea dansants held every 
Saturday afternoon from 2:30 to 5:00. 



Teacher: "Correct the sentence, 'The 
liquor what the man bought was soon 
drunk." 

Bright Pupil : "The man what bought the 
liquor was soon drunk." — Everybody's. 



Patient — "The appendix is a useless part 
of us. We could live quite well without it." 

Doctor — "You could — but we doctors 
couldn't. — Klods Hans (Copenhagen). 



NEW LOCATION 

Of the Old-Established Firm of 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Cosgrove announce the 
opening of their new hair store, beautifully 
fitted and equipped with every modern 
convenience and facility for perfect service, at 

360 Geary Street 

Next to St. Francis Hotel 



July 31, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 



The Happy Breeding Grounds 



While the judging of Holstein cows in the 
arena of the California International Stock 
Show at San Francisco last fall was being 
delayed for the lack of one entry few 
realized that the Royal Lady, Tilly Alcartra, 
for whom they were waiting, was just bring- 
ing into the world a son who would bring 
buyers from four continents to bid for him 
or that the price would mark the highest 
price ever paid for a youngster under six 
months of age at a public sale. 

Stepping proudly into the arena from 
which she was led with the blue ribbon, 
Tilly Alcartra returned to her young hopeful 
who promptly scrambled to his feet and, 
with waving brush, started to fulfill his 
mission on earth. Less than six months later 
and he is knocked down to a bid of $50,- 
000 made by two buyers from Canada. 

Another California bred bull. King Korn- 
dyke Pontiac Acme, also was in demand, the 
bidding running up to $41,000, at which 
price he was sold to Mrs. Anita M. Baldwin 
of California. 

These two bulls were sold at the first 
National Co-operative sale which was held at 
St. Paul, Minn., and the animals which were 
put up for sale were the pick of the whole 
United States. 

That California was able to consign such 
an array of talent to this sale only further 
proves this State's eminence as the beau 
ideal breeding ground of the country. 

In addition to the fact that the average 
price paid for the California cattle consigned 
to this show was over three times greater 
than that of any other State, California also 
received first prize money of $500 for the 
State which consigned ten head or more 
having the highest average sale price. 

So much for the dairy cattle. 

Now comes telegraphic advice that 
Inchcape, the fleet two-year-old of J. H. 
Rosseler, has been sold for the record price 
of $160,000 to S. C. Hildreth of New York. 

When Inchcape stepped off six furlongs at 
the Aqueduct track in 1.12 under a strong 
pull, beating a crack field of two-year-olds. 
Mr. Hildreth promptly raised his bid for the 
colt from $50,000 to $160,000 and the fleet 
son of Rose O'Gold and Friar Rock was lost 
to California, but his sire remains. 

There is no climate and there are no con- 
ditions in the world which are equal to Cali- 
fornia as a breeding ground for all classes of 
stock. At least that is the confident opinion 
of breeders in this State and the above two 
shining examples serve but to point the 
statement. 

\nd Little Sweetheart! 



Bred by the Ormondale Corporation, this 
Shorthorn heifer, sired by Golden Goods, 
Jr., dam Sweetheart, goes to the Grand Inter- 
national Live Stock Show at Chicago and is 
given the coveted Grand Champion Medal 
as the best female shown. Little Sweetheart 
put Redwood City on the map! 

At the Sacramento State Fair three years 
ago California-bred Percherons and Clydes- 
dales topped the list, winning in every class. 
The running horses have more than held 
their own in the big events in the East, and 
California drafters are winning recognition 
as the most dependable animals in city 
trucking and country farming. Such has 
been the demand for California horses of the 
draft type that the State today has less 
young stock than at any time in the last ten 
years and it behooves ranchers with good 
brood mares to breed to the best stallions 
obtainable if they desire to reap the profits 
that are sure to come with the heavy in- 
creased demand that is being felt for de- 
pendable draft stock. 

With national records showing the heavy 
increase in operating expenses of trucks over 
horses, with the trebling of the price of gas 
in five years, with truck and tractor drivers 
demanding one dollar per hour for their 
work, more and more demands are made on 
ranchers for horses and mules for draft work 
while the price goes soaring. Breeding to 
good big mares with good big stallions is 
better than investing in "wild cats" that may 
bring fortunes, but most generally bring 
tears. 



ENGLAND 

By Beryl Carter 

England — a meadow loud with bees. 
Shut in with tall unwindy trees. 
And colored like an angel's hair 
Because of all the kingcups there. 

England — the ghost of an old mill 
Still standing dauntless on a hill. 
Itself as old as shadows are. 
Or the hxt shining of a star. 

England — a woodway paleiy lit 
With primrose where children sit. 
Big bloomy bunches on their laps. 
And in their hair, and on their caps. 

England — a meadow loud with bees. 
Shadowed by honeyed linden-trees. 
The color of a sunset sky — 
For this men live — for this — they die. 

— Literary Digest. 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Sts. 
Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without 
dining in the finest cafe in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner $1.75 



CLOCK 
REPAIRING 




ALL MAKES 
OF CLOCKS 
REPAIRED 



WATCH DEPARTMENT 
Chimes and complicated clocks a specialty 
Clocks kepi in order by contract, town and 

country 

We carry an attraclive line of new clocks 

Work guaranteed in every detail 

CALIFORNIA CLOCK CO. 

418-19 Whitney Bldg. 133 Geary Street 

Phone Garfield 2570 J. Topping, Manager 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 

PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 
Offices— 505-507— 323 Geary Street 

Phone Douglas 2433 



SUMMONS 

105936 

In the Superior Court of the State of California 

in and for the City and County of San Francisco. 
Olga Elizabeth F.nnis, Plaintiff. 

vs. 
John Cradock Fnnis. Defendant. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the 
Stale of California in and for the City and County 
of San Francisco, and the complaint filed in (he 
office of the County Clerk of said City and County. 

The people of the State of California send greet- 
ing to John Cradock Fnnis and Mrs. J. Avrillaud, 
Defendants. 

You are hereby required to appear in an action 
brought against you by the above named Plaintiff in 
the Superior Court of the State of California, in 
and for (he City and County of San Francisco, and 
to answer the Complaint filed therein within ten days 
(exclusive of the day of service) after the service on 
you of this summons, if served within this City and 
County; or if served elsewhere within thirty days. 

The said action is brought to obtain a judgment 
and decree of this Court dissolving the bonds of 
matrimony now existing between plaintiff and de- 
fendant, on the ground of defendant John Cradock 
F.nnn" adultery with said Mrs. J. Avrillaud. and of 
said John Cradock Fnnis' desertion of plaintiff, also 
>eral relief, as will more fully appear in the 
Complaint on file, to which special reference is 
hereby made. 

.And you are hereby notified that, unless you ap- 
pear and answer as above required, the said Plain- 
tiff will take judgment for any moneys or damages 
demanded in the Complaint as arising upon contract, 
or will apply to the Court for any other relief de- 
manded in the Complaint. 

n under my hand and the Seal of the Super- 
ior Court of the Slate of California, in and for the 
City and County of San Francisco, this 1 5th day of 
April A. D. 1920. 

(Seal) H. I. MULCREAT. Clerk. 

By L I WELCH. Deputy Clerk 

Frank D. Macbeth. 506 Humboldt Bank Bid" . San 

Francisco. Cal.. Attorney for Plaintiff. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 31. 1920 



Sunbeams 



There is a man, living in Cleveland, who 
has to go to New York a good deal and 
would like to have his wife go with him, but 
slje feels she can't leave home. 

"Some day," she says, "I'll go with you." 

At last he got an idea. After the last trip, 
when she said this for the fortieth time, he 
replied: 

"I don't think you would have a good 
time, dear, and I won't urge you again." 

"Why not?" she said. 

"Well," he replied cautiously, "you are 
a little jealous, you know." 

Did she go with him the next time? She 
did. — Ladies' Home Journal. 



"1 am very much impressed," remarked 
the personage from abroad, "by the extreme 
generosity displayed by the gentlemen who 
designate themselves as Democrats and Re- 
publicans." 

"I don't quite see where you get that gen- 
erosity idea," said the somewhat rugged 
person. 

"I am surprised that you should fail to 
note how industriously each party points out 
to the other exactly where it is making its 
most serious mistakes." — Washington Star. 



"Look here," yelled the man in the next 
flat, pounding on the wall, "I can't sleep 
with that kid squalling like that! If you 
don't make him stop, I will!" 

"Go to it!" cried the parent of the noisy 
infant. "You'll be as welcome as flowers in 
spring." — Ladies' Home Journal. 



Pat, whose regiment was in action, became 
quite overcome by fright and started on a 
run for the rear. An officer called on him 
to stop, shouting: "Stop, or I'll fire at you!" 

Pat increased his speed. "Foire away!" 
he yelled. "Phwat's wan bullet to a bushed 
av em?" — Ladies' Home Journal. 



"I heard you accused your rival who 
wants to marry Nellie of wishing to kill you." 

"Oh, no. I merely remarked he wanted to 
ring my Nell." — Baltimore American. 



Bore — "Yes, I don't know how it is, but 
I feel thoroughly wound up tonight." 

Hostess — "How very strange! And yet 
you don't seem to go." — London Tit-Bits. 



Along with Sir Oliver Lodge's declaration 
that the world will exist a million years or 
longer, it is Interesting to speculate on how 
high sugar will be by the end of time. — 
Lexington Herald. 



TRANSPORT LIBRARIES IN NEED OF 
MAGAZINES 

Magazines, new and old — but not too old 
— are wanted by the American Library Asso- 
ciation for the use of soldiers and sailors on 
transports. The association supplies libraries 
for both Naval vessels and Merchant marine 
ships. Magazines will be received either at 
the dispatch office of the American Library 
Association, 34 Sacramento street, or the 
public library, Civic Center. 

Books, especially technical works of in- 
terest to sailors, are all desired. Another 
transport sails next week for Manila and it is 
desired to have sufficient magazines to 
supply it. 



U. S. GARAGE 
750 Bush St. Phone Garfield 713 



PEARSON GARAGE 

345 Bush St. Phone Douglas 2120 

Repair Shop and Annex 350 Bush St. 



Largest and Most Complete Garages in 
the West 



Two small boys stood looking into a win- 
dow containing an exhibit of the the Tuber- 
culosis Society. There were two glass jars, 
one labeled, "This lung is diseased," the 
other. "This lung was diseased but it was 
cured." 

"Ain't it funny," said one of them, "if the 
man was cured, how they got his lung in 
that jar?" 



Pioneer 
Carpet Cleaning Works 

Renovating Sewing Laying Sizing 

Especially Equipped for Handling 

Valuable Rugs and Carpets 

Prompt MOTOR TRUCK SERVICE 

Established 1868 Tel. Doug. 3084 

353 Tehama St. 




4-iN-i 

Auto Camping 
Beds ° 



The Complete 4-IN-l Camp Outfit 
Is Carried as an Auto Seat-Cushion 

r, h<- I-IN-I Auin Bed combines the comforl of your homebed, 
dreai Ing-roomnnd settee, with the thrill of camping In th'gnut outdoors. 

No cumbersome handle on tout runiiing-buurd or In the tonneau 
ol yuur ear. ti ■ I-IN-I merelj replaces the cushion on your seat. » bloh 
is left tit borne. 

The Illustration shows the complete outfit, Including springs. 

limn iv-.-. r;m v;t- rn\ . r and I wtit folded read J tO tW u»-i\ a- a. cushion ftUd 

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4-IN-1 AUTO BED CO. 




July 31. 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



BOOK REVIEWS 

"Empress Eugenie in Exile" will probably 
be the title of Agnes Carey's book on the 
late empress, whom the autTior knew person- 
ally. The Century Company will publish the 
book immediately. 

Mrs. Carey's volume, it is explained, is not 
a formal biography of Eugenie; it is a 
chatty, informal book aiming to give the 
chief facts of her life, especially while on 
the throne of France, and to reveal her per- 
sonality in her own words. 

In 1886 the empress and the author were 
both at Farnsborough Hall, in England, the 
author remaining there as a visitor for ten 
months. She was then twenty-six years old, 
and the empress, then sixty, took a decided 
fancy to the American girl. During long 
drives and walks and on many days and 
nights in the house, Eugenie talked to the 
author, reviewing her life and making com- 
ments upon personages and events that inter- 
ested her. There was no thought then of a 
book in the author's mind; but for years she 
had written her grandmother a letter every 
day, and so every day of the ten months she 
was at Farnsborough Hall she wrote home, 
always chronicling the interesting things re- 
lating to the empress. Reviewing these 
letters later at home, she found that together 
they supplied a great deal of unusual infor- 
mation. A book was suggested to Richard 
Watson Gilder years ago, he was keen for 
it, and a contract was signed, which pro- 
vided, however, that no part of the manu- 
scrips should be published until the empress' 
death. 

The manuscript is now released, and the 
Century Company is rushing the book 
through the presses. "Empress Eugenic in 
Exile" is not presented in the form of letters; 
the book is based upon the author's letters 
home and her memory. "Empress Eugenie 
in Exile," Century Co., New York. 

"Mac of Placid" is the title of a novel to 
be published early in August by The Century 
Company, the author being T. M. Long- 
streth. who may be called a mountain fan. 
His first two books, "The Catskills" and 
"1 he Adirondacks," are remembered as in- 
fectiously enthusisatic accounts of the 
author's journey through the two mountain 
sections indicated. For several years Mr. 
Longstreth has been living in winter as well 
as in summer in the Adirondacks. at Lake 
Placid, and he has there gathered material 
for his new novel, it is said. Not far from 
Lake Placid is Saranac, where Robert Louis 
Stevenson lived for a while; and Mr. Long- 
streth, who is also a Stevenson fan. could 
not resist the temptation to make R. L. S. 
one of the characters of his story. Steven- 
son appears, the publishers announce, in his 
gayest and most delightful mood as an ally 
of the mountain boy who is making a heroic 
fight, again discouraging odds, for a delect- 



able mountain girl of the name of Hallie. 
"Mac of Placid," Century Co., New York. 

The title of the forthcoming book by 
Frederick O'Brien, author of "White 
Shadows in the South Seas," has been 
changed from "Drifting Among South Sea 
Isles," to "Mystic Atolls of the South Seas." 
Mr. O'Brien is at work on the volume now, 
in California, at the same time giving a help- 
ing hand to the men who are making "White 
Shadows in the South Seas" into a play and 
a motion picture film. "Mystic Atolls of the 
South Seas." Century Co., New York. 



AT THE PALACE OF FINE ARTS 

An interesting addition has just been made 
to the Loan Collections on exhibition in the 
Palace of Fine Arts where Dr. Charles 
Hadden Parker's collection of ancient and 
modern miniatures has just been placed on 
exhibition in the F. Hopkinson Smith gallery. 

This most interesting and varied collection 
comprises portraits as well as landscape 
miniatures from Italy, France, England, Bel- 
gium, Spain, Russia and far-off India, which 
is represented by several portraits of native 
princes and princesses rendered in the 
colorful style characteristic of the Hindu 
school of miniaturists. But perhaps the 
most interesting to the general public are the 
sprightly portraits of French lords and ladies 
of the seventeenth and early eighteenth cen- 
turies, such as the two portraits of the 
"Countess de Montesson" by Laurig and the 
portrait of "Marie, Duchess de Chevereus," 
and the several beautiful portraits of gentle- 
men of the time. And here we have a por- 
trait of the famous Mme. Du Barry on the 
cover of an old bonbon niere, as well as sev- 
eral men and women of the English nobility, 
and a very beautiful copy by Guer of the 
famous portrait of "Mme. Vigee Le Brun 
and Daughter," the original of which is in 
the Louvre. 

The gems of the collection are undoubt- 
edly the serious and faithful rendering of a 
portrait of a young English boy whose 
features recall some of the early portraits of 
English writers, the "Portrait of a French 
Gentleman," by Mme. Luie de Breval, and 
the "Portrait of a French Gentleman" of the 
eighteenth century, the authorship of which 
is unknown, while the "Portrait of a Young 
Woman" by Maricot and "The Portrait of 
Mme. A — " a very beautiful seventeenth 
century miniature, will undoubtedly attract 
much attention by reason of their exquisite 
workmanship and fine characterization. 

The exhibition of this very interesting col- 
lection of miniature will undoubtedly serve 
to emphasize another aspect of portraiture — 
as it must be remembered that some of the 
greatest painters, such as Holbein. Durer and 
Cranaca frequently practiced the intimate art 
of the miniaturist. 

The exhibition ought to do much to re\ne 



an interest in this aristocratic old art which 
was brought to its perfection long before 
photography had been thought of and which 
has languished and almost disappeared since 
meeting the rivalry of the camera. 

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE 
STATE OF CALIFORNIA. IN AND FOR 
THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN 
FRANCISCO. 
In Ihe Mailer of the Application of SOUTHER 
FREIGHT HANDLING AND STEVEDOR- 
DORING COMPANY for a change of its 
Corporale Name lo SOUTHER WARE- 
HOUSE COMPANY. No. 108448. Dept. 16. 
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE WHY AP- 
PLICATION FOR CHANGE OF NAME 
SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED. 

Souther Freight Handling and Stevedoring Com- 
pany, the said corporation, and Kenneth Monteagle 
and A. T. Gibson, a majority of the Directors 
thereof, having filed and presented an application 
that the name of said Souther Freight Handling and 
Stevedoring Company be changed lo Souther Ware- 
house Company. 

IT IS HEREBY ORDERED that all persons 
interested in said matter appear before the Superior 
Court of the Slate of California in and for the City 
and County of San Francisco, Department 1 6 
thereof, at the City Hall. No. 400 Van Ness 
Avenue, in said City and County on Monday the 
30th day of August, 1920, at the hour of 10 
o clock A. M., or as soon thereafter as counsel can 
be heard, to show cause why such application for 
change of name should not be granted- 

AND IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that 
notice of said application and of this order be given 
by publication of a copy of this order in The San 
Francisco News Letter, a newspaper of general 
circulation, printed and published in the said City 
and County of San Francisco, State of California, 
once a week for four successive weeks before said 
hearing. 

Dated this 22d day of July. 1920. 

BERNARD J. FLOOD. 
Judge of the Superior Court. 
ENDORSED 
Filed July 22, 1920. 

hi. I. MULCREVY. Clerk. 

By L. J. WELCH. Deputy Clrrk. 

MONTEAGLE ^ RIXI ORD. 

Attorneys for Applicant. 

14 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



E. F. HUTTON & GO. 



MEMBERS 



New York Stock Exchange 

490 California St. and St. Francis Hold 
Branch: Del Monte Hotel 

Private Wires 
Coast to Coast 



Old Hampshire Bond 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

The Standard Paper for Business Stationery. 
"Made a little better than seems necessary." The 
typewriter papers are sold in attractive and durable 
boxes containing hve hundred perfect sheets, plain 
or marginal ruled. TKe manuscript covers are sold 
in similar boxes containing one hundred sheets. 
Order through your printer or stationer, or, if so de- 
sired we will send a sample book snowing the anhre 
line. 

BLAKE. MOFFIT & TOWNE 

Established 
»7 -ti FIRST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 31, 1920 



Pleasure's Wand 

"We Obey No Wand But Pleasure's" 



At The Orpheum. 

Is it necessary for me to write anything 
about the Orpheum show this week? Every- 
one in San Francisco is there and none is 
left to read my stuff. They all go and see 
for themselves and laugh for themselves and 
get all the fun of it at first hand. Well, I'll 
have a few words to say, just for my own 
amusement. 

And the first words that jump off my pen 
are "Hoot Mon!" Oh, the bonnie charm o' 
they Scotties! To hear them sing and to 
watch their sturdy legs go a-dancin' to the 
tunes of the pipes — it takes one back to the 
banks o' Loch Lomond, the bonnie, bonnie 
banks in the song (by the way. that's one 
they did not sing for us! is it too hauntingly 
sad, laddies? Yes, I daresay, but I love it.) 
And the way they gave us "Sandy's 
Weddin' " was a treat. Who was it said the 
Scots have no sense of humor? Sense of 
humor, why man, they are full of humor and 
its all got some sense to it. These Wyatts' 
Lads and Lasses that have come to sing to 
us have brought with them a whiff of the 
bracing air of their heather-covered hills and 
deep glens where the wee trooties hide in the 
pools. 

Jeannette Childs, the "Joy Girl," uses 
Paderewski's minuet for one of her "turns." 
And she does not mis-use it. That Creole 



Fashion Plate surprise is most clever and it 
keeps the house rocking for five minutes 
after — it comes off. Irene Franklin, sophis- 
ticated Irene, was in good form. What a 
thing real talent is! 

My, my, aren't you glad you are not a 
ticket scalper? I quaked with fear as I 
read the terrifying allusions to them in the 
program and thought what would happen to 
me if I had chosen that calling. Are they 
Indians? And whom do they scalp? Or is 
it the gifted author of "Page 3" that is 
going to scalp them? It's very exciting any- 
way. 

Solly Ward and Marion Murray bring to 
our ears the true echo of Little Old N'Yawk 
and the wild life there. Jim Harkins is very, 
very funny. I never saw any one quite like 
him. The Rubeville company gave us a 
generous program. 



"A Tailor Made Man" at the Alcazar. 

Many are the vicissitudes for the stock 
company. This week we find our friends at 
the Alcazar away up in high society, drink- 
ing champagne and all that sorta thing. 

The story of the "Tailor Made Man" is 
very American and that accounts for its 
lengthy run in New York, followed by briefer 
but no less successful ones all over the 
United States. And now we in San 



Francisco are privileged lo see the work of 
Harry James Smith's pen done most excel- 
lently well by the Alcazar players. The 
tailor's second assistant who leaps from his 
pressing table to the manager's desk in a big 
business, who wears gracefully another 
man's clothes, makes pretty speeches to the 
ladies, quells a threatened strike, and then 
sits down in the twilight with a contemplative 
cigarette and wonders what's the blooming 
use, at which moment the beautiful girl of 
his poor days comes in — there is a part to 
put an actor on his mettle and bring out the 
very best that is in him. 

Eyes — pardon, Ayres, "he with transition 
sweet new speech resumes" and has us all 
with him from the start. He did not miss 
this chance to show what a good actor he is. 
Inez Ragan, pink and blonde and demure, 
adored him ; pray, how could she do other- 
wise? And she told him about it in a voice 
whose quality is pleasing and rare. 

Henry Shumer's tailor was well done; in 
dialect, manner and appearance he was the 
tailor. But of course Mr. Shumer is 
clever, and we would not have our praise 
sound patronizing. 

Emily Pinter surprised her audience by the 
sprightly manner in which she carried off the 
Kitty Dupuy part of society dame. Brady 
Kline showed how far removed is a news- 
paper man from a villain and how much 
more like the former he is than the latter. 
Alfred Hesse's Dr. Sonntag is stamped with 
the hall mark of ability; a fine piece of act- 
ing. Al Cunningham makes the most of the 
valet part and his Cockney accent rings true. 
As Jellicott he missed it. 



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Yc D'eanj mariners, la^e lo your coves. The Thirteen Sirens n>hich Frank Dohson, 
Orpheum circuit, arc due to arrive here for an engagement at the Orpheum next n>cc£. 



comedian extraordinary, pilots over the 



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July 31, 1920 

As for Ben Erway, his versatility quite 
carries one away with it. As Peter, the canny 
Scot, he made one of the hits of the produc- 
tion. That burr is not easily fastened onto 
an American tongue. The name of Rafaelo 
Brunetto simply must be attached to a ro- 
mantic part before this writer is satisfied, 
although as a "financial king" he is accept- 
able. Even the extremely wealthy are feel- 
ing the pinch of high prices in the barber 
shops, evidently or does Rafael fancy that 
bit of whisker? 

Jean Oliver has a nice name. She richly 
deserves her rapid rise in the social scale, 
and within a few days we behold our saucy 
maid an heiress. Gladys Emmons, her 
mother in the play, also apparently very rich, 
is good looking and has a good manner. 
Stella Warfield has an effective bit to do and 
does it cleverly. Her "Miss Shayne, the 
typist" is intelligently handled, and leaves 
nothing to be desired in crispness and office 
efficiency. 

The play is full of bright lines. It is a 
pity that Smith's pen is laid down forever. 
Many of the speeches stay in one's memory 
because of their .pithiness. The Alcazar 
music was, as always, well chosen and well 
given. 



Curran — "Linger Longer Letty." 

Charlotte Greenwood is an elusive person 
— she always slips away and leaves you with 
the tantalizing feeling that you have not had 
quite enough. It's like that while you are 
looking at and listening to her and when you 
try to put a pen on her — Why, she stands off 
and mocks you from afar, with that subtle 
smile of hers. In her present "Comedy with 
Music" she has no weighty plot to carry and 
be a burden to her supple young shoulders, 
and that is as well. Why be bothered with 
a plot when you have such a' first-rate com- 
pany of singers to keep you constantly di- 
verted? Robert Higgins, a southerner and 
a baritone, is a droll, attractive chap. Char- 
lotte has never had a better leading man. 
They sang "Let's Pretend" (in which the 
plot was unfolded) delightfully. "My Lady 
Fair" was well done, and of course "Linger 
Longer Letty" was popular. 

All theatre-loving San Francisco is on the 
qui vive to welcome Jane Cowl next week. 
This beautiful and charming actress will find 
many eager audiences here who have to wait 
sometimes too long for the wonderful thing 
that she is going to give us. It is Art. 

— CASU. 



Advance Announcements 

A Wonderful Team at the Alcazar. 

The Alcazar is after a sensational batting 
average this summer, and is knocking out 
home runs with the calm regularity of a 
"Babe Ruth." Its team working players are 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

headed by two delightful young leading 
people who possess ability and magnetism, 
more admirable qualities than mere tempera- 
ment. Dudley Ayres and Miss Ragan know 
their business and attend to it with zeal and 
enthusiasm and without friction. They are a 
picturesque pair, the man, big, graceful, 
well poised and dark, contrasting with the 
blonde, blue eyed beauty of the young 
actress who proved a revelation in "Peg," 
and this week's audaciously humorous 
"Tailor Made Man." These young artists, in 
manner and methods, grace and dignify a 
company of the Alcazar's splendid quality. 
They will be well bestowed as Jack and 
"Blanny" Wheeler in next week's first stag- 
ing at the Alcazar of Avery Hopwood's 
fervid and feverish farcial comedy, "Fair 
and Warmer," in which the quick silver of 
merriment registers high temperature mark in 
the thermometer of frivolity. It is all harm- 
less fun, even though it becomes furious in 
the cocktail episode, a reminiscence of that 
wide open period, mournfully referred to by 
the convivially disposed as "them were the 
happy days." No funnier, or more innocent 
farce ever made the country laugh. In the 
cast also are the expert farceurs, Ben Erway, 
Emily Pinter. Brady Kline, Henry Shumer, 
Rafael Brunetto and Stella Warfield. 

"The Crimson Alibi" on Sunday, August 
8, is melodrama of punch and baffling com- 
plication. It is based on Octavus Roy 
Cohen's vivid story. The dramatization was 
made by George Broadhurst and has been 
holding New York audiences in the grip of 
suspense at his own theatre for the past six 
months. Alcazar enterprise in securing the 
most up-to-date eastern novelties is aston- 
ishingly alert. 



New Bill at Orpheum. 

Laughter will be the applause at the 
Orpheum this week for a bill of almost solid 
comedy will make its appearance Sunday. 

Frank Dobson and his Thirteen Sirens, an 
unusually gaysome musical comedy, with 
thirteen girls selected for their beauty as well 
as their talents, will be the principal attrac- 
tion. Frank Dobson. a comedian of attain- 
ment, will contribute more than his share of 
merriment, it is predicted. 

"Mrs. Wellington's Surprise." a sketch 
written by George Kelly for the purpose of 
filling the demand vaudeville makes for light 
comedy, is another act for which unusual 
merit is claimed. The surprise is one for the 
audience, it is said, as a tremendous "punch" 
marks the close of the turn. 

Ralph C. Bevan and Beatrice Flint will 
have plenty of light talk and merriment cre- 
ating songs. Will Mahoney. comedian of 
note, will hold the stage several minutes with 
his monologue based on the theme. "Why Be 
Serious?" 

Francis Yates and Gus Reed will prove 



15 



they are jocular entertainers with their 
"Chinese Circus." Edna Schowalter, Ameri- 
can coloratura soprano, is destined to 
further establish herself in the adoration of 
true music lovers, it is promised. 

"Rubeville," favorite for its delineations 
of rural types, and Yates and Reed with their 
mirth-provoking turn, are scheduled for an- 
other week. Topics of the Day, pictorial 
news and Orpheum orchestra, are other 
pleasant ingredients of the new Orpheum 
bill. 



UNIQUE MARQUARD'S 

Are there times when the' usual restaurant 
fails to appeal to you? When everything 
palls, — the surroundings, the music, the 
cuisine? When your appetite demands some- 
thing out of the ordinary, something unique? 
We have a remedy for this. Turn your steps 
toward Marquard's, at the corner of Geary 
and Mason streets, and find a table some- 
where in its genial atmosphere, at the lunch 
hour (a special luncheon is served for busi- 
ness men from 12 to 2), or at the regular 
dinner de luxe (from 6 to 9), after your 
strenuous day's work is over. 



san FRANCISCO 



th£ o«t w m NAU0t>t\\.ve 




I 



Next Week-Starting Sunday 



FRANK DOBSON 
THIRTEEN SIRENS 



BEVAN A FLINT 



'RUBEVILLE' 1 



WILL M \ MONEY 



YATES A REED 



1EB.OMF, A NEWELL 



r in v smowalter 



"MRS. WELLINGTON'S SURPRISE" 

nhro— ttc to $i HattnM — 26c to 7fic 

Bppl Snliirrfny.. Sunday nn.l Rolldua) 
MATINEE DAILY— Ph DoullW M 

don't patronize scalpers 

ALCAZAR 

THIS WEEK-THE AUDACIOUS COMEDY 

"A TAILOR MADE MAN" 

WEEK COM. NEXT SUNDAY. AUGUST I 

Avery Hodwood's High Temperature Farce 

Foaming with Feverish Fun 

"FAIR AND WARMER" 

A Wry Stimulating Comedy Cocktail 

THE ALCAZAR COMPANY 

INEZ RAGAN DUDLEY AYRES 

SUN. MAT. AUG- cW-Anolher Novelty. 

George Broadhurst's Newest New York Success 

"THE CRIMSON ALIBI" 

Ma»tcrpieee of Mystery and Melodrama bated on 

Octavus Roy Cohen's Great Story. 
I Mat*. Sun.. Thurs.. Sat. 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIALTY 

Ri. Jin--" Luncheon II a B. tol P rn 
548 Sacramento St.. cor. Leidaidorff 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 31, 1920 



The Motorists 



FOR SALE 

A touring car, with a piston ring, 
Two rear wheels, one front spring. 
Has no fenders, seat made of plank. 
Burns lots of gas, hard to crank. 
Carburetor busted halfway through, 
Engine missing — hits on two. 
Only three years old, four in spring. 
Has a shock absorber, 'n Ev'r'thing. 
lwo sparks missing, front axle bent. 
All tires punctured — not worth a cent. 
Got lots o' speed, runs like the deuce. 
Burns either oil or tobacco juice. 
If you want this car, inquire within — 
Helluva good car for the shape it's in. 

V -j- v 

Whatever temporary quietness individual 
dealers may have to report for the summer 
months, there is a universal forward-looking 
spirit of optimism that presages big things 
and lots of them for San Francisco's entire 
"Automobile Row." 

Just when the business boom will gain full 
speed, few persons can guess, although all 
agree that it will be much sooner than was 
thought possible a few weeks ago. 

In the meantime, the progressive San 
Francisco distributors and dealers are going 
right ahead with their preparations for the 
biggest business in the history of the "Row." 
Many of them are completing new buildings, 
or enlarging those in which they are at 
present located. 

Prominent among those who are erecting 
new homes is Fred W. Hauger, prominent 
figure in local automobile circles for a num- 
ber of years, who was recently named as the 
western distributor for the new Carroll Six 
line, a Lorrain, Ohio, product. Hauger has 
secured distribution rights for eleven western 
States and plans to make San Francisco his 
headquarters. His new building at Bush and 
Larkin streets will contain every improve- 
ment the art of architecture and the science 
of modern building construction has to offer 
the automotive industry. 

•:• -:• •:• 

With the completion of their new building 
on Washington street, just west of Van Ness 
avenue, the King-Holloway Company, of 
which Ray Holloway is president, has moved 
to its new quarters and the McFarlan now 
has a home as good-looking as the car itself. 
While not in a class with the largest build- 
ings on the "Row," the McFarlan head- 
quarters constitute one of the most attractive 
structures — inside and out — in the automo- 
Dile-selling district. 

•:- 9 -> 

Another handsome building recently occu- 
pied is the Al G. Faulkner Company's new 



home at Post and Hyde streets. A distinct 
departure in location from most of the auto- 
mobile distributor's places of business, Faulk- 
ner's building has attracted much favor- 
able comment because of its artistic interior. 
A winding staircase at the rear of the 
spacious salesroom leads to the offices on the 
mezzanine floor. 

-> 9 9 

In appointments few buildings in San 
Francisco can rival the new Marmon home, 
for nothing has been forgotten to carry its 
handsomeness of appearance through the 
whole plant. Even the service department 
marks a new departure along this same line. 
9 9 9 

The Hawley-King Company, distributors 
of Oakland Sensible Sixes and of Globe 
Tires as well, will change their name as well 
as their place of business when they move 
into their new building in a few weeks. They 
will be known as the California Oakland 
Company and will be located on Van Ness 
near Jackson. Building plans include quite 
an elaborate service department in addition 
to a much larger sales floor than their present 
one. 

* -> * 

Another new and attractive building, the 
home of the new Lincoln, is also located in 
the same vicinity. This was recently com- 
pleted and now houses the offices of the 
Murphy Motors Company, although no 
models have yet arrived for salesroom dis- 
play. 

-:• * * 

Work on Don Lee's new eight-story build- 
ing at Van Ness and O'Farrell is also pro- 
gressing with great rapidity, and the con- 
tractors believe they will be able to complete 
the new Cadillac home on schedule time with- 
out difficulty. 

S 9 9 

One of the big gala events of the year for 
the members of San Francisco's automobile 
"fraternity," and for a number of the more 
prominent officials and merchants of the city 
as well, is scheduled for August 14. It will 
consist of a giant barbecue at "Pop" Mc- 
Cray's famous resort in Sonoma county. 

The event is in the nature of a birthday 
party for McCray, who has entertained 
thousands of San Franciscans al his resort 
in the last two decades. Tickets are selling 
at a hundred dollars a pair and the finance 
committee reports many thousands of dollars 
worth already taken. 

The general committee in charge of the 
affair consists of the following prominent 
San Franciscans: Chester N. Weaver, 
chairman; E. A. Hamlin, Harry Cosgriff, 



Wm. Mikulich, Al Coney, Jack Barnes, 
Edward Meister, Orlando Stevens, Dr. Geo. 
Holbrook, John Tail, Felton Taylor, D. A. 
White, Robert Roos, Harry Marquard, Rene 
Panchon, Jos. A. Murphy, Fred J. O'Connell, 
Carl Hader, C. G. Thompson, Leslie Tubbs, 
Stephen Cassanellie, Dan Murphy, Tony 
Nichols. Don Lee, Harry C. Elliott, B. J. 
Rosenthal. 

The finance committee is as follows: 
William L. Hughson, R. M. Tobin, Theodore 
Roche, H. 0. Harrison, Herbert Fleish- 
hacker, James RoLph, Jr., Wm. H. L. 
Haynes, William H. McCarthy, John L. 
Brittain, Walter Murphy, Jos. Tynan, Well- 
ington Gregg, Jr., Robert W. Martland, Cliff 
Durant, William Humphreys. 
9 9 9 

I hey are still talking about the record 
made a few days ago by the Jordan Sil- 
houette Six. driven by G. G. Damon, whole- 
sale representative of the C. D. Rand Com- 
pany, Jordan distributors for Northern Cali- 
fornia. Driving to Atascadero and return, 
the little Jordan rolled up an average of 
27.84 miles to the gallon, which for 464 
miles of varying road, stands as a very re- 
spectable average — considerably higher than 
the national average as reported by the 
Jordan factory. 

S 9 9 

This is indeed the season of transconti- 
nental touring; several interesting parties of 
cross-country tourists have arrived in San 
Francisco during the past week with interest- 
ing narratives of road conditions on the 
various routes west. 

One of these, a group of Philadelphians 
in a Standard Eight, covered 4612 miles of 
road, including such inconsequential side- 
trips as Pike's Peak and through the Grand 
Canyon country, on 413 gallons of gas, 
about 100 of which was distillate, they 
stated. This gives them an average of 11.17 
miles to the gallon, an excellent record for 
an eight-cylinder car considering the route 
traversed and the fact that there was no 



Quality 

TIRE SHOP 

Expert Tire and 
Tube Repairers 

Quality Retreading 



MARSHALL SQUARE 
VULCANIZING CO. 

10 Marshall Square 

if* si. ku rurka 

Phone Market 3837 



July 31, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



special attempt to save gas at any time. 

The Standard finished the trip without 
mechanical difficulties of any kind. Follow- 
ing were its passengers. E. J. Schueneman 
and wife, Fred C. Holz, his sister-in-law and 
little girl. There was also a blooded bull 
terrier and baggage for the entire party. 

H. F. Humphries, Northern California dis- 
tributor for Standard Eight, reported that 
Schueneman's car was in condition to start 
back across the continent without more than 
the lightest kind of overhauling. 

Another interesting cross-continent trip 
recently completed here was that of A. 
Baker of Shreveport, Louisiana, who is driv- 
ing a Haynes all over the country. Already 
he has traveled over 4800 miles, without 
trouble of any kind, even to retaining his 
four original tires which are still able to give 
many additional miles of service. 

Leaving Shreveport with six passengers 
on June 3, he journeyed through the Pan- 
handle of Texas to Manitou, directing his 
course thence to Colorado Springs. After a 
trip to the top of Pike's Peak, the Haynes 
proceeded north to the Yellowstone Park. 
Baker was the first tourist to drive his car 
through the park this year, and at one place 
it was necessary to plough through a thirty- 
foot snow bank. This was on June 15. 

Crossing the Continental Divide, he pro- 
ceeded over some of the worst roads in the 
country to Seattle, where a few days' rest 
were enjoyed. From this point to San Fran- 
cisco little time was taken out, although a 
visit was paid to the famous Crater Lake. 

Phillip S. Cole's mechanical force at the 
San Francisco Haynes headquarters was 
astonished at the excellent condition of the 
Haynes on its arrival here. 
9 9 8 

Scores of motorists are attending the free 
lectures given every Wednesday evening at 
the automobile school of the San Francisco 
Y. M. C. A. at 220 Golden Gate avenue. 
These lectures, dealing each week with a 
different phase of the automobile industry, 
are proving exceedingly interesting to auto- 
mobile owners. After each lecture the 
teachers of the school devote themselves to 
giving free insliuction to motorists in making 
simple adjustments and road repairs. Attend- 
ance to the Wednesday night lectures is free 
to all interested. 

9 8 8 

The Francis-Stoll Company, at 1235 Van 
Ness avenue, has brought out a wonderful 
convenience to the motorist, in the shape of 
a crystal rear view mirror. This is made of 
the best plate glass, beveled edges, silvered 
by the latest improved process, with 
enameled bronze brackets, polished nickel 
ends, and substantially braced in the back. 
This gives a clear view in the rear at all 
times, has three adjustments, and is a thing 
of service, beauty and utility. Phone Pros- 
pect 1621. 



Could anything be more convenient, and 
add more to the comfort of a camping trip, 
than the auto camping beds manufactured 
by the 4-in-l Auto Bed Co., at 149 Valencia 
street? Only seven minutes are required to 
set up this unique outfit, which provides a 
thick floss mattress, a coil spring bed for 
two, a water-proof tent, with ample dressing 
room and large pockets for storage of 
clothes, etc., and the whole contrivance can 
be carried as a cushion in any standard 
make car. Phone Market 8489. 
© © © 

The following superior points in the 
Parker Adjustable Anti-Skid Units for motor 
trucks, are worthy of note and make it the 




5. No hollow parts to clog with ice. snow or dirt 
and always in working order. 

6. Easily installed. 

To install no tools are necessary. 
To attach — Slip chain over hook, and turn steel 
anchor to locking position. 

© © © 

1 his is not a "filler," but a complete one- 
piece inner tire. To use it on your car 
means smooth sailing all the way, no blow- 
outs, no punctures. It will mean that you 
will save time, temper and trouble. Nails, 
glass, rocks or sharp pieces of metal have no 
effect on "Parco" Inner Tires. They're posi- 
tively puncture proof. On account of their 
remarkable success, many imitations have 
flooded the market, all of them inferior to 
the original. This tire is on sale by the 
Eastern Manufacturers Company, 312 Clay 
street, San Francisco. 



all-round, satisfactory auto accessory that it 
has proved to be. This unit is manufactured 
by the Parker-Morse Company, of Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 

I . Complclc device drop forced. 

2- Adjustable to the spoke in both directions and 
but two sizes required to fit all spokes of trucks 
from one *o seven ton capacity. 

3. I look sets on the outside o'f spoke, making 
attaching chain easy and clean operation, a-, ii is 

to reach around to the opposite side of 
a wheel. 

4. Both end links of the chain attach to the 
same hook equalizing the strain on the hook and 
alto on the spoke. 



— There are many garages in town and the 
motorist is often in a quandary as to where 
to go, especially for permanent service. 
There are very few who give you the quality 
of service of Dow & Green, on Taylor street, 
between O'Farrell and Geary. Here your car 
will receive something more than the "once 
over," and the prices are moderate. 



AUTOMOBILE 


STARTING 


AND 


LIGHTING SYSTEMS 




Give satisfactory results when given 
lention. We specialize on Electrical 
•lorsge batteries, etc., and guarantee 


proper at- 
equipment, 

satisfaction. 


GUARANTEE 


BATTERY 


CO. 


Brand 


& Cushman 




955 Post St. 


Phone P 


ospect 741 



SUNSHINE GARAGE 

HIGHWAY AND 12TH AVE., SAN MATEO. 
Auto repairing, painting, top and curtain work, and upholstering. A full and com- 
plete line of automobile accessories at city prices. All our work guaranteed. Day and 
night service. All work done by competent mechanics. Give us a trial and be convinced. 
Distributor! and icnrice for Lxidc batteries. Phone San Mateo 33. 




16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 31. 1920 



BALLADE OF LETTING THE WORLD 
WAG 

Bend not your lovely brows in such distress. 
Wring not your sympathetic heart with wo. 
Because the world has got in such a mess. 
And all things swiftly to the devil go! 
Tis thus the gray steals in and wrinkles 

grow. 
Beware of worrying where you cannot mend; 
Believe me. things were always about so. 
"Let the world wag" is a wise word, fair 

friend! 

I sometimes, too — thus much will I confess — 
Sadden my eyes and heart, and overflow 
With rage at all the wo and wickedness 
Of this old, weary planet — Yea, although 
'Tis but ill-spent emotion well 1 know; 
For all things, glad or sad, come to an end. 
And all things, bad or good, were ever so. 
"Let the world wag" is a wise word, fair 
friend ! 

For mortal man sorrow and happiness 
Were ever thus in transient ebb and flow; 
Always life here would ban, and there would 

bless. 
Nor did men always reap as they did sow; 
Evil waxed fat and kicked, justice was slow. 
And weak the arm that would the right 

defend; 
God slept, men said, as now — it may be so. 
"Let the world wag" is a wise word, fair 

friend! 

Envoi 
Princess, the world is verily a vain show. 
God hath it in His keeping; Heaven send 
His blessings on it! Yet for us, e'en so, 
"Let the world wag" is a wise word, fair 

friend ! 
—Richard Le Gallienne. in Munscy's Magazine. 



SOISSONS 

Over these winter wastes where broke the 

wars 
Now falls the weary night. And once again 
High in the hollow dusk burn the great stars 
Like rockets, rise and gleam — upon the 

Aisne. 
Over the buried dead no brown leaves 

hover; 
No spring-scents linger. In her death-hung 

lair 
Here Autumn mourned alone the passing 

year 
And wailed unto the moon, that all was over. 

Peace, like a snow, has feathered down and 

sighed. 
And swung the living heart to a far height. 
From wastes aflash with guns, these hearts 

that died 
Have taken wing, for some great evening 

flight 
On vaster pinions of the Soul ; to skies 
Of spfing, brown autumn leaves — and 

memories. 

— Hardwicke Nevin in Literary Digest. 



A man was being tried for selling illicit 
whiskey. The liquor was offered in evi- 
dence. The jury returned after taking 
fifteen minutes to come to a decision. 

"What is the verdict?" asked the judge. 

"We would like more evidence," replied 
the foreman of the jury — Everybody's. 



A shell had just exploded outside the dug- 
out and a scared darky came tumbling in. 

"What's the matter?" asked the lieuten- 
ant. "Are you hurt?" 

"No, sah," answered the darky. "Dat 
shell had my name an' number but thank 
Gawd it lost ma address." — Everybody's. 



Fig; Packing Demonstration 

Mrs. Fred Hansen has installed a miniature packing plant in our stcrc. where she is demonstrating to 
the public the modern methods and sanitary conditions under which 

SIERRA BRAND FIGS AND RAISINS Are Packed 

This special event should not be overlooked by anyone. 

Special prices on all of Mrs. Hansen's packs during this demonstration. 

Now at GOLDBERG, BOWEN & COMPANY, Grocers, 242 Sutter St. 



CLIINIOIN LArEljCyRlA Opposite Orpheum Theater 

Continuous Serving from 7 A. M. to 8 P. M. — Music. Lunch and Dinner Orchestral an J Vocal 



Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 



CAPITAL $3,000,000 
FIRE 



AUTOMOBILE 



ASSETS $22,500,000 
MARINE 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Co. in America" 

FIRE AUTOMOBILE WINDSTORM 



TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



REASONABLE RATES 




Don't Experiment With Your Eyes 

CONSULT 

DR. GEORGE MAYERLE 

Exclusive Eyesight Specialist 
And Expert Optometrist 

Scientific Eye Examinations 

OVER 25 YEARS 
IN SAN FRANCISCO 

MAYERLE'S Eyewater 
A Marvelous Eye Ionic 
For Children or Adults 

At Druggists 50 Cents 
By Mail 65 Cents 

San Francisco, California. 
960 Market St. 



Graney's Billiard Parlor 



Finest in the World 
Perfect Ventilation 
924 Market Street 
61 Eddy Street 



EDDIE GRANEY, Proprietor 



We Casa del Rey 

is a million dollar fire-proof hotel, on 
the sunny bathing beach at Santa 
Cruz. It offers the advantages of 
tennis, golf, motoring, fishing and 
swimming, and is the center of Santa 
Cruz social life. 

MORRIS & WARNER, Props. 



IHfoftd St M®tfcfew 



QUDHtl 

217 Second Avenue, San Maleo 
SPECIAL SUNDAY DINNER $1.00 
MEALS A LA CARTE 

Special attention paid to banquets, automobile 
parlies and tourists. The only first-class a la 
carte restaurant in San Mateo. The hotel is 
entirely new; hot and cold water in every room. 
All well lighted. Rooms with private bath. 
Prices moderate. Summer rates given. Elevator 
service. 



EPPLER'S 

BAKERY and LUNCH 

886 Geary Street 



Branch Confectionery 

SUTTER and POWELL STREETS 
Phone Douglas 1912 



The Cecil Hotel 

of San Francisco offers 
the perfect combination 
of home and hotel life. 
Cuisine excellent. Lux- 
ury of billiard, card and 
reading rooms. 

Mrs. O. I MORRIS. Proprietor. 



J, B. Pou J. Bcrsjrz C. Lulannc 

..iitard C. Matlhebuau 

I'.l RCJ Z-l RANrCS 

Old POODLE-DOG Co. 

HOTI I AND RESTAURANT 

Music and Entertainment I. very Evening 

41 S. 421 Bush St.. San Francisco 

(Above Kearny) liange. Doug. 2411 



WHAT MUDGIE REMEMBERED 

Mudgic, aged two years, was much inter- 
ested in the Mother Goose rhymes, especially 
the story of Bopeep and her sheep. At Sun- 
day school she was learning the Beatitudes. 
One day her mother asked her to repeat 
them to a visitor. 

Mudgie l>egan : "Blessed are the pure in 
heart " here her memory failed her. 

Her mother thought to prompt her: "For 
they " she said. 

"For they shall come home," finished 
Mudgie triumphantly, "dragging their tails 
behind them." — Ladies' Home Journal. 



END OF THE LINE 



The dapper young man lost his footing on 
the long and slippery hill, and was to- 
bogganing toward the bottom, when he col- 
lided with a stout lady, tripped her, and pro- 
ceeded on his way, with the lady seated on 
his back. 

As they came to a halt at the foot of the 
hill, the lady seemed slightly dazed by events, 
. i] . lie remarked gently: 

l'ou'll have to get off here, madam. This 
is rs far as I go." — Ladies' Home Journal. 



WHEN HE USED DIPLOMACY 

"Papa." said a young hopeful of seven as 
he looked up from a book he was reading, 
"there's a word here that puzzles me — di- 
plomacy." 

'Diplomacy, my son." answered the 
father, smiling paternally, "means doing the 
right thing at precisely the right time." 

"Oh." said the boy. 'then I guess I used 
nacy last night." 

"How. my boy?" asked his fond parent. 

"Why. I rolled Johnny over into my place 
just heforc ma crmc in with the castor oil. 
then back again just before she came 
to the other side." — Ladies' Home Journal. 



HE KNEW 



' Now, children." said the teacher, "a man 
;id leaxes a million dollars: one-tenth 
goes to his wife, onc-twelith to a son. one- 
sixteenth to a brother, onc-twcl'lh to an 
uncle, and the test to a distant relative. 
What docs each get?" and the smallest boy 
in the class raised his hand and shouted: "A 
lawyer." — Ladies' Home Journal. 



In Minnesota last year a little Swede pre- 
sented himself to a certain schoolma'.-m for 
instruclion. 

Wli.il is your name?" the teacher asked. 

"Yonny Olsen." he said. 

"How old are you?" 

" \y not know how old Ay bane." 

"Well, when were you born?" continued 
the teacher. 

bane not born at all: Ay got step- 
mutter." — Everyb 



Wedding Presents: The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell streets. 



Want a Better Position? 

Bell Syllabic Shorthand in Six Weeks. 

Bell Touch Typewriting in Six Weeks. 

Our Complete Stenographic or "Dictaphone" 
Course in about Two Months. 

If you wish to prepare in ONE-FOURTH 
the time and at ONE-FOURTH the cost, EN- 
ROLL NOW. 

One of our courses makes an ideal Holiday 
for the wife, son or daughter, and PROTECTS 
THEIR future for all time. Individual instruc- 
tion. Day and Evening. 

Investigation costs you nothing, and may save 
regret. 

THE SYLLABIC INSTITUTE 
"The 6 Weeks' Business School." 

376 Sutler Street. (Douglas 4316) 
SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

INSURANCE BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 



ALADDIN 
STUDIO 
TIFFIN 
ROOM 

220 POST V FOURTH FLOOR 

SAN FRANCISCO 

m 

SPECIALIZING FIFTY CENT 
LUNCH 



HAmE MOOSER 
M. C. MOOSER 




PHONE 

n 2»eo 



N W COPNEW 

POLK and POST STS. 



-S'"We are advertised by our loving friends" }§£ 



Myran K. Nelson, 
Clarence, Ills. 



Mellin's Food 

Mellin's Food, properly prepared, 
furnishes every element a baby needs 
to grow and develop as Nature intends. 
That is why Mellin's Food babies grow 
strong, robust and vigorous. 

Send today for a Free Trial Bottle of Mellin's Food. 



Mellin's Food Company, 



Boston, Mass. 



LA L I i S i A i i- I- I li 
SACHEMENTC) 
LAL IF 



KAKKgQs 




<&ulif#mm3Kto*trt%#t& 




SATURDAY, AUGUST 7, 1920 





Liquid or Plaster 




VsU 






8TATE 

1 A £ 



■i 



They end corns 

now in this scientific way 



People who know — millions of them — now end all 
corns in this way. 

They apply Blue-jay, either in liquid or in plaster 
form. It means but a touch and it takes but a jiffy. 

The com pain slops. Then the Blue-jay gently 
undermines the corn so it loosens and comes out. 
THE MODERN WAY 

Blue-jay was invented by a chemist who studied 
corns. 

It is made by a laboratory of world-wide repute. 

Old-time treatments were harsh and inefficient. 
Blue-iay is gentle, quick and sure. 



Now all corn? are needless. All these pains can 
be avoided. To let corns remain while you pare and 
pad them is folly. 

You can stop a corn ache the moment it appears. 
You can end a corn completely before it can develop. 

Blue-jay has proved these facts to millions. It 
will prove them to yo*: — <.nd 'onight — if you let it. 

Quit the old methods of dealir with roms and 
see what this new way means \our druggist sells 
Blue-jay. 




Blue=jay 

Plaster or Liquid 
The Scientific Corn Ender 

BAUER & BLACK Chicago New York Toronto 



Telephone Sutter 6654 



Importers 



GEO. W. GASWELL CO, 

COFFEE AND TEA 

Spices, Baking Powder, Flavoring 

Extracts 

442-452 Second Street, San Francisco 



For that stubborn cough 
Use Old Snake Doctor's Cough Remedy 

SNAKE DRUG CO. 

Formerly G. Leipnitz & Co. 

Now Located at 

127-129 KEARNY ST. 



MacRORiE - McLaren co. 

FLORISTS. NURSERYMEN 

and 
LANDSCAPE ENGINEERS 

141 Powell Street, San Francisco 

Nurseries: San Mateo 

Phone San Mateo 1002 

Phone Douglas 4946 and Palace Hotel 



A. \V. BEST 



ALICE BEST 



BEST'S 
ART SCHOOL 

1625 California Street 

Life Classes — Day and Night 

Illustrating Sketching Painting 



TIRES VULCANIZING 

THOMAS H. ELKINGTON 

Distributor for 

Kelly-Springfield Tires 

Long Mileage Tires and Second Hand Tires 

865 POST ST.. Near Hyde 

Phone PROSPECT 1566 




FIREPROOF 

STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1636 Market St. 

Bet. Franklin and Gough 

Tel. Park 271 San Francisco 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of Pro- 
prietors 



$20,000,000.00 
16.000,000.00 



Aggregate Assets. 30th 
Sept. 1919 




$335,181,247.00 



SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E., General Manager 

340 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States. New Zealand. Fiji. Papua (New 

Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australian Banking 

Business. Wool and other Pioduce Credits Aranged. 



London Office: 
29 THREADNEEDLE STREET. E. C. 2 



Head Office: 

GEORGE STREET. SYDNEY 

Agents: 

Bank of California, National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bank. Crocker Nat'l Bank 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up Capilal $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 

STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and at LONDON. ENO; NEW YORK: 

PORTLAND. ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE. 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Manager W. J. COULTHARD. Assistant Manager 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 California St.. San Francico, Cal. 
Member of the Federal Reserve System 
Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement and 7th Avenue 

HA1GHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30. 1920 

Assets ....$66,840,376.95 Capital Actually Paid Up $ 1,000.000.00 

Deposits 63.352.269.17 Reserve and Contingent Funds 2.488.107.78 

Employees' Pension Fund $330,951.36 

OFFICERS 

IOHN A. BUCK. President 

GEO. TOURNY. Vice-Pres. and Manage. A. H. R. SCHMIDT. Vice-Pro. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE. Vice-President A. H. MULLER. Secretary 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE. Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN. Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL. Assistant Cashier 

G. A. BELCHER. Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN, Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYER. Manager Mission Branch W. C. HEYER. Manager Park-Presidio Dist. Branch 

O. F. PAULSEN. Manager Haight Street Branch 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

IOHN A. BUCK E. T. KRUSE I. N. WALTER A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY A. II. R. SCHMIDT HUGH COODFELLOW E. N. VAN BFRBEN 

E. A. CHRISTENSEN ROBERT DOLLAR L. S. SHERMAN 

GOODFFJ.LOW. EELLS. MOO^E fc ORRICK. General Attorneys 



EVERYONE FEELS the change that hrs come over business — The feeling is different 

from that of six months ago, or even one month ago. 
THE PER50D OF EXPANDING CREDIT has been brought to an end. Loans are 

contracting. A big volume of money will soon be seeking investment. 
LOND PRICES which have been lower than in fifty years, will certainly strengthen as 

this demand makes itself more and more felt. 
HIGH INTEREST RATES cannot long continue. 

Our investment service is at your service 
BOND DEPARTMENT 



THE ANGLO & LONDON-PARIS NATIONAL BANK 



Sansome and Sutler Streets 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone Kearny 5600 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856. 




fER 



Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




vol. xcvm. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., SATURDAY, AUGUST 7, 1920. 



No. 5 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA AD- 
VERTISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. Fred- 
erick Marriott. 259 Minna Street, near Fourth, San Francisco, Cal. Telephone 
Kearny 720. Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-Office as second-class mail 
matter. 

London Office — George Street & Company, 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) — 1 year, $2.50. Foreign: 1 year $5. 
Canada: 1 year, $3.50. 

Fa Follette refuses to run as candidate of the Committee of 

Forty-eight faction for president. When aspiring candidates "refuse 
to run," they are simply running true to form. 



We believe that the "efficiency" expert should be examined 

with a stethescope. It needs an executive with a good heart to 
manage a large business of any kind, and make it successful. 



We have offered asylum for foreigners in Lower California, in 

the event of fighting. We wonder how many Germans, Austrians, 
Japs, etc., (who have been intriguing in that district for years) will 
be included under this decision? 



Perhaps, after all, it takes a woman to exhibit the quin- 
tessence of silliness, as shown by a communication signed "Mrs. 
A. R. Hemple," to the Chamber of Commerce, at Long Beach, asking 
that target practice by the Pacific fleet be stopped on account of the 
annoyance that the sound of the guns gave her pet bull dog! 



And now comes a very silly member of the sterner sex. who 

blocks traffic with a huge funeral to his pet canary, in the city of 
Newark. The bird, who belonged to Emidio Russomanno. had a 
"voice as sweet as Caruso's" so his owner said. The cost of the 
funeral was $400, and a crowd of ten thousand people 
witnessed it! 



Judging from the manner in which much of the installation of 
electric wires is made in this city. San Francisco, in the opinion of 
local electricians, is blessed with conditions quite favorable to naked 
wires encased in wooden mouldings. The carelessness with which 
the dangerous current is conducted along cellar ways, through walls 
and over woodwork by the regular telephone and lighting companies 
is bad enough, but when boys and men of individual firms undertake 
to establish a safe conduit, the result is not infrequently hair-raisma 
to those having even a superficial knowledge of how the work should 
be done. 



Lloyd George, who. in the beginning of his administration. 

appeared to have the welfare of the common people at heart (as 
witness the quietus he put upon the House of Lords) is apparently 
becoming extremely autocratic in his reign. To quote "Mohammed 
Ali," head of the Indian Mussulman delegation. "The entire East 
has fallen into the hands of Lloyd George." Any statesman who is 
in office for any length of time, gradually turns despotic. That 
is why America looks with disfavor upon the "third term.' 



It must have seemed a "long, long way to Tipperary," to 

Brigadier General Lucas, when he at last arrived there, after escaping 
from the Sinn Feiners, who had kidnapped him over a month ago. 



Kent appears to be as much of a weather-cock as Wm. 

Hearst. He is running on a Republican ticket for U. S. Senator from 
California, and still, during his recent term in Congress, 60 per cent 
of the votes he cast were for Democratic measures! 



In 1913 he came out strongly against the Monroe Doctrine, 

and advocated the distribution of Bingham's book, — "The Monroe 
Doctrine; an Obsolete Shibboleth," as "a national duty." When we 
realize that this most American of all American documents pre- 
vented the troops of Napoleon the Third from seizing Mexico and 
placing Maximilian on the throne during the Civil War; that when 
England undertook to enforce certain of her claims against 
Venezuela by force of arms. President Cleveland gave notice to 
England that we would enforce the Monroe Doctrine if necessary 
by arms, and so blocked Britain's schemes; 



That when Germany tried the same thing with the same 

Southern country, and Roosevelt put the Doctrine into effect with 
salutary results; that when Japan purposed to establish a naval 
station at JVIagdalena bay, this Nation gave notice that it would 
regard such an act as violating this good old Doctrine, and Japan 
respected this warning, and has not established a naval base in 
Magdalcna bay; 



Why. when we call to mind the different situations in which 

the Monroe Doctrine has sounded the tocsin, and then learn that 
Kent approves its abolishment as an "obsolete shibboleth," we would 
like to ask Mr. Kent what potent Federal ordinance he would 
originate to take its place; we wonder, also, what foreign country 
he has become interested in. during his time in the National Capitol? 



We have some hopes of the discovery of the much-hunted 

and argued-over North Pole, now that Amundsen has taken the 
expedition in hand. He discovered one pole, why not the other? 
And we must not forget his discovery and navigation of the North- 
west Passage, with only the tiny vessel, the Ghouia (is that the 
way to spell that unpronounceable word? At any rale it's hauled 
up on the beach near the Park, and you can read the name 
any day.) 



With what different feelings do we now look upon our fresh- 
faced middies that are dotting the streets with their funny little 
white caps, than we did when the great war was on! Then it was 
with mixed emotions. — sympathy and sorrow for their mothers, pride. 

perhaps — in their e\ident love of country, pain at the thought of 

their strong boy-bodies being torn by shells! At present we take 
comfort in thinking of the "spell" of peace they are now enjoying, 
and hope that it will out-last their healthy young lives. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 7, 1920 



Editorial 



A statesman, to serve the people, must have his hand 
Shortridge on the pulse of the public, and at the same time, if his 
for Senator mind is absolutely absorbed in the interests of the 
people, and he is the right sort of leader, it is only 
natural and to be expected that to some extent, he will sway them 
by his oratorical powers to his purpose. Oratory is the necessary 
lightening, the elevating influence, the leavening grace in the sordid 
game of politics which leave it still respectible enough for gentlemen 
to indulge in. 

This age is a hard, commercial; utilitarian, noisy, unromantic, 
ill-bred age. The trend of art toward futuristic painting, the demor- 
alization of the stage, the dignity of poesy ruined in "vers libre," 
the general jazzing of all the better things in life, proves this. And 
even in politics there is a tendency to cut out oratory, the only 
quality in politicians which brought to their avocation any elevation 
of thought, any finesse of feeling. 

Perhaps this phase is only a passing one, a kind of madness that 
will not last, but it would be well, to our way of thinking, to nurture 
and cherish what remnants we have left of delicacy and elegance 
in all the arts and vocations, especially in the calling of politics. 

There are a few statesmen and politicians still existing in Cali- 
fornia, men whose refinement of delivery, whose inspired thoughts, 
coincide with their clean mode of living and their knowledge of what 
the public demands. Men who have fearlessly voiced their opinions 
on all vital questions, without thought of the advancement of their 
own interests. Men of the "old guard," — the decent "old guard," 
who have not gradually lost all their polish of manner, their dignity 
of expression in the rough and demoralizing scramble of politics. 

We believe Mr. Shortridge belongs to this category. We have 
heard him speak on many subjects, — laughed at his inimitable 
drollery, came near to tears at his inimitable pathos. Gloried in the 
thought that the effete East could not apply their usual adjectives of 
"crude" and "uncultured" to his name. Felt that he had the power 
to sway his audience, at the same time possessing a sympathy with 
the lowliest in that audience. A man of broad ideals, who stands 
for the advancement of California, not its retrogression, who will be 
fair to all classes, who has stayed with his party through thick and 
thin, who has never cried quits. 

Samuel Shortridge is not wealthy. In fact, he is, in the light of 
this unlimited capitalistic age, a poor man. As he has been in the 
political arena off and on, about all his life, that fact alone should 
elect him! 



In the latter part of the seventeenth century, a little 
The Acorn group of people interested in shipping, were in the 
and the Oak habit of meeting at a coffee house in Tower street, 
kept by one Edward Lloyd, in the gray old city of 
London. I can see them in that old coffee house, can't you? Ship 
captains, and first mates and owners of ships, and maybe, just plain, 
"able-bodied seamen." Coffee houses themselves have a fascination 
all their own, even if we have never seen them except in print. 
They call up other gatherings to our minds, in the city by the 
Thames, — gathererings of poets, — Tom Moore, the audacious, who 
used to sing songs to his irate landlady, and charm away her just 
indignation over a delinquent rent; Byron, esthetic and charming, in 
spite of his deformity, — sad-eyed Keats, whose name was writ in 
something more tangible than water; the talent and genius of 
England, in the days when talent and genius counted for some- 
thing. 

And no less interesting could be the small group of sea-going folk, 
the men who braved the deep when the only motive power of water 



craft was the bellying canvas, when the wireless was unheard of. 
and the dangers of old ocean lured only those of great courage and 
strength. 

What sea tales must have been told around the tables there, stories 
that would make the modern sea-writer pale into insignificance! 
What strange mysteries unfolded, what superstitions whispered! 

Afterward this Lloyd moved his coffe house to the corner of 
Abchurch Lane and Lombard streets, in 1691, and being a man of 
enterprise, he started a newspaper in 1696, in which he gave a list 
of the vessels of whose arrivals and sailings he had heard. This 
paper he called "Lloyd's List." 

With the exception of one thirty year interval, Lloyd's List has 
appeared regularly ever since, and is still widely circulated in 
shipping circles. It is received daily at the American Consulate 
General in London, and is exceedingly useful, as it contains reports 
day by day of the arrivals and sailings in every port in the world, as 
well as much official, semi-official and commercial information on 
shipping topics, shipbuilding, ship insurance and freight rates. 

From this small beginning, Lloyd's has become a universal source 
of shipping information, not only in the British Isles, but all over the 
seven seas. Since its birth in the humble coffee house, it has moved 
its quarters several times, and now occupies the Royal Exchange 
building, which was opened by Queen Victoria in 1844. Lloyd's has 
been there continuously ever since that time. 

The verdict given by its surveyors is accepted by all marine 
insurance companies as the basis for fixing their insurance premiums. 
The corporation itself does not issue any insurance policies or assume 
any liabilities under them. All the underwriting business is trans- 
acted by individual members of the society, each of whom carries on 
his own business for his own account and risk, the general practice 
being for several members in association, but not in partnership, to 
carry on their business through a single agent, who underwrites and 
acts for the whole group. 

Lloyd's was incorporated in 1871. It has established signal 
stations and wireless stations at many important points on the coasts 
of the United Kingdom and abroad. There is a Lloyd's agent or sub- 
agent at every port in the world. 

Reports of casualties which are received are announced by the 
ringing of a bell, known as the "Lutine Bell," placed in a very 
prominent position in the general room. 

To aspiring and ambitious youth, this great corporation, with its 
humble beginning in an obscure restaurant, should be taken as a 
wonderful example of what one man's enterprise, perseverance, and 
observation can accomplish. Like the proverbial acorn, with its 
first green sprouts from the small kernel, to the branching forth 
of the towering oak, this great organization has grown and flourished 
until its roots have crept into every nook and corner of the globe. 



Some of the lugubrious are busy in calculations 
The Cost of War. as to the cost of the late war in life and 

property and nervous energy. All sorts of 
figuring is done and the results are wailed forth in dolorous tones. 
But to what end? The war did cost a great deal, more in fact than 
all these computers will ever succeed in estimating. But it could 
not be helped. If you are attacked and the very source of your 
being is threatened, you have to fight back if you are nearly killed 
in the process. If you emerge half dead with your bones broken 
and your strength almost gone, you are still to be congratulated 
supposing that the enemy is in a worse case, and the risk of exterm- 
ination is for the moment removed from you. It is unfortunate that 
Germany attacked, but she did attack, and it is very babyish to sit 
down and whine over the sores that were the price of victory. The 
only thing is to get well as soon as possible. 

But, say the miserable computers, "We lament so that there may 
be an end of this in the future and that wars may cease when people 
learn how expensive they are." 



August 7, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



But it won't do. This sort of argument has been disposed of by 
history, tribes and nations have been decimated, famine has followed 
on slaughter, disease has run rampant and exterminated whole 
peoples, as a result of war. The hideousness of war has been 
apparent from the beginning, still people fight. Even now with the 
memory of the last war fresh in our minds we don't feel that peace 
is to be compared with some minor hallucinations which we have 
with regard to national dignity and matters of that sort. If it were 
not so, there would have been do difficulty on the part of this country 
joining the League of Nations and helping to make the chances of 
war more remote. But no, we prefer even a vulgar jingoism with all 
its risks to the chances of peace which might prick some of the 
minor bubbles of our vanity. 



(Of course you have all heard of the man who vowed to tell 
Lies the truth, and nothing but the truth, for one whole day? At 
the end of the eventful day, he had lost his sweetheart, and his 
fortune, and found himself lodged in jail). 

We believe that truth is a fundamental instinct in all human beings. 
That the first impulse of the child, cross-examined by its parent, is 
not to lie, or deceive, but to reveal what it has done in the way of 
mischief. That impulse dies under the stern gaze, the harsh 
exclamation. Its little heart beats faster with a dread of what may 
come, and it denies its misdeed, through the grim instigator — Fear. 

An absolutely fearless person does not lie. He or she has no 
reason to tell anything but the whole truth, and take the conse- 
quences. But where is the absolutely fearless person today? Does 
he or she exist? Has the world any room for such a person? In 
fact, doesn't the world rather scorn and ridicule the honest man? 
"Poor, but honest ! " Have not these words become a sort of 
anathema? 

The world makes liars of us all. The gray-haired, wrinkled 
woman, left with a family, or just herself to support, after a sheltered 
married life, goes out into the high-ways and by-ways of the business 
world seeking work. Employers look at her askance. Why hire a 
faded creature like this, no matter what her ability may he. when one 
can secure the indifferent, but more welcome services of some pretty, 
fresh thing just out of college? 

After walking her shoes into shabbiness, and her spirit into despair, 
the seeker for honest labor "hennas" her hair, (though alas, it is not 
at all becoming!) lays the powder on thicker, uses rouge for perhaps 
the first time in her life, and takes ten years from her age. not only 
in appearance, but in literal speech. Why acknowledge oneself 
forty-five or fifty, when one can pass for thirty-five? 

The refined woman sickens a little at this first lie. but after thai 
the world lays holds on her, and whispers evilly to her. — "Why tell 
the truth, poor fool, when no one else does? You will only be mis- 
understood." And gradually a hardened crust is formed around her 
heart, and the lies that come to her lips from then on. fail to leave 
a bitter taste in her mouth. 

It is an accepted fact (whether true or not), that women are 
more deceitful than men. In a man-made world, how could they 
possibly be otherwise? It is only within the last few years that 
women have received anything in proportion to what they gave, and 
in the "good old days" it was only by intrigue and deception that 
the fair sex could make life at all worth living for themselves, except, 
of course, in a few isolated instances. For fear of the world's 
censureship. they smiled and endured infidelity and neglect from their 
husbands: for fear of hard and stony roads of labor, they chose the 
softer lanes of licentiousness and deceit. House-keeping was not 
considered a trade, an occupation that justly demanded a decent 
wage. It was a woman's "duty" to keep house and bear children, 
and receive the necessary money to pay bills as if it was a favor 
bestowed upon her. So of course, she lied about the hills' 

The war has helped to change all this: to further woman's cause, 
so that she can stand out honestly in the open light of day and take 



her place with her brother in the paths of toil, at almost her 
brother's wage! But released from one form of deceit, is she to be 
plunged into another? Will the long, thin finger of Time, frosting 
her hair, drawing tell-tale lines upon her face, halt her on her road 
of labor, point at her mockingly, and say, "Now, lie yourself out of 
this, if you can ! " 

During the years of the war, an Englishwoman of our acquaint- 
ance, anxious and eager to serve her country, applied for the position 
of nurse in the Red Cross, not only the British Red Cross, but the 
American as well. She was healthy, strong, enthusiastic, in the 
prime of life, but alas! she was over forty, and being honest, 
admitted it. All her efforts to get into some sort of position at the 
front, or in hospitals in England, were futile. 

In many large firms and factories, men who knocked off ten and 
fifteen years from their ages before our entry into the war, in order 
to secure employment, were forced in self defense to tell the truth 
(what an ironic paradox!) when the second draft came, thereby 
bringing about a false condition in their affairs which no doubt they 
were at a loss to explain; — all through fear, — fear of not securing 
the privilege of earning their daily bread, in the first place, and 
then fear that the State would snatch them from fairly comfortable 
homes, and fling them into a maelstrom of blood and battle, of whose 
motive or reason, they understood nothing! 

Lies are varied, — the social lie. the spiteful lie. the scandalous lie, 
the criminal lie, — but the most pathetic, the most to be deplored, and 
alas! the commonest, is the lie of fear (not so much the lie itself, 
as the conditions that force the lie), fear of that cold-hearted, hard- 
headed, immutable old demoralizer, — the World. 



A priest living down the peninsula, disgusted at 
The Uncovering the scarcity of clothes of some of his women 
of the Covered parishioners, when they desired his services in 
the marriage ceremony, has announced that he 
is going to keep a kimono in the vestry room, in which to clothe 
the offending fair sex. 

A British clergyman has come out strongly against the prevailing 
styles in women's dress, and refused to give communion to all 
women who kneel at the altar rail in atlire (or lack of attire) which 
he may regard as immodest. 

Father Joseph Parlin. celebrating high mass at St. Paul's Roman 
Catholic church, in Cardiff. Wales, issued the following warning to 
his congregation: "I hope," he said, "that lady members of my 
parish will not attempt to array themselves in some of the present- 
day fashions." 

A judge in Chicago rcfu>ed to proceed in a divorce case until 
the fair plaintiff went home and put on more apparel, which she 
did under protest. 

One of the prerogatives which women have taken in conjunction 
with their new freedom, is an unconventionally in dress. Some 
years ago, a woman in trousers, walking in the streets, would be 
taken into custody at once. We can remember as children, how 
shocking Dr. Mary Walker seemed to us. when she insisted on dis- 
carding skirts in favor of the bifurcated garments of the sterner 
sex. and received special permission from the United States Gov- 
ernment to don them. Now it is no unusual sight to see some pretty 
miss striding down the street in hiking breeches, and really aren't 
they just as modest as the split or sheath skirts of a former time? 

The situation grow^ more and more alarming to some of our 
dear old ladies and gentlemen, when we realize that while the 
shorter the skirts become, the lower grows the corsage. One is 
reminded of that cute toast, — en en when we could toast each other 
m something stronger than Hrsaparilla. and when the split skirt was 
more in evidence: "Here's to the V-shape and the split skirt! May 
they never meet!" 

A hidden and garmented form may be more alluring than the 
(Continued on Page 7) 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 7, 1920 



Town Crier 

Hear the Crkr: Who the Devil Art Thau? 

One That Will Play ihc Devil. Sir, Wilh You. 



A usually erudite contemporary balks at the use of the phrase 

"On the knees of the gods." He should be informed that this is a 
mythological simile and refers to the Golden Age when the gods of 
High Olympus held mighty revel, quaffing the contents of their 
golden cups so often that poor Ganymede wore out three pairs of 
rubber heels a day chasing the empties and filling 'em up again. I 
am afraid the explanation will shock my friend, in these prohibition 
times, but the affairs of mortal man. to be decided by the gods, 
were in those days carelessly thrown into their laps by the reveling 
mighty ones, and it was about an even chance whether the be- 
fuddled deities would notice the petitions of the mortals or let their 
hopes fall carelessly to the ground and be forever shattered. The 
plural use of gods is by poetic license No. 1337. 



Now that the nominating conventions have done their work 

and been retired to oblivion the people will, for a time at least, 
have a surcease of the output of that crying nuisance, the "special 
writer." It is common knowledge that when the average newspaper 
man writes upon political matters, not only are his conclusions wrong, 
but almost invariably he tries to be funny, and facts easily obtainable 
are ignored, misquoted or deliberately altered to suit the needs of the 
writer. The hack-writer — who must eat — has learned that abuse 
of the politician is fashionable, remunerative and seldom leads to 
reprisals. There is likewise a small class of muckrakers ready to 
make any sacrifice of truth if by so doing they can momentarily 
stand in the limelight and say, "I did it." 



It is suggested that if our different religious denominations 

could be induced to pool their issues, be placed upon a business 
basis and a few of the chief trade exhorters of our wholesale houses 
delegated to take charge of foreign missions, the spread of the 
Gospel might be more rapid. The advance of religion differs from 
the growth of business in that the former appears to be more effective 
when attempted at a distance from the home base. The heathen 
appears to more readily accept our blessed religion when not per- 
mitted to come here and observe its practical workings. 



No one in Southern California ever saw an ostrich poke his 

head in anything but a bucket of corn, but we must accept the story, 
dear to our childhood, that the queer old bird in the face of danger, 
buries its head in the sand and firmly believes that he is safe from 
harm and thoroughly concealed from his pursuers. The fable or 
fact, and this is immaterial, prints a moral for the human ostrich in 
all its varieties. The bird, whose plumage adorns our wives and 
sweethearts and depletes our pocketbooks, may in its brain space 
contend with a variety of emotions, and accident may at times save 
it from plucking. The human ostrich who expects a like result will 
get its percentage of the good fortune of fools, but the incident of 
disaster will outweigh the chance of escape by a large majority. 



Mr. Jack Johnson, cullud, and of pugilistic leanings, asserts 

that his fight with Jess Willard. retired champion of the fistic art, was 
a fake. As Mr. Willard denies this, one of two things is manifestly 
true: either Mr. Johnson or Mr. Willard is a liar of the first magni- 
tude. Yet I know that Mr. Willard is not a liar and that Mr. 
Johnson is not of the first magnitude. People who acquire a belief 
by absorbing "such things as dreams are made on" not infrequently 
get confused notions, which may explain the above confusion of 
facts with fallacies. 



Federal supervision of all quasi public utilities is just now 

put in prominence as the panacea to cure all troubles that attach 
to these great and much worried industries Forgetting the experience 
of those who escape the ills they have, to fly to others that they know 
not of, the laborite, the bolshevik, the anarchist, the world reformer 
and the dissatisfied generally, mirable dictu, are playing on the 
same harp — all insist upon Government ownership. In the meantime 
the general public choruses with one accord, like Caesar in extremis, 
"Save me, Cassius, or I sink!" And in the great ocean of graft, 
investigation, profiteering, taxation and high prices, the little dove of 
succor is supposed to be perched on the white dome of the capitol 
at Washington with prohibition in its bill, a token as the Noahachian 
olive branch, that there is a dry spot somewhere upon which the 
business ark can rest and find peace. McAdoo, the living example of 
Federal incompetency in business matters is so soon forgotten! 
"Surely the times are out of joint." But despite this wail of the 
dyspeptic pessimist and the yellow scare-head of the sensation 
monger, the United States has kept abreast of the times, a little in 
advance, if anything, and is up to date with the best intelligence of 
the twentieth century. 



The editress of a woman's journal rises to inquire: "Why 

should Mr. Wilson be blamed for his persistence in adhering to the 
dictates of his own reason?" He should not, my dear, for the reason 
that he cannot help himself. Our president appears to be one of those 
who think that in all the reaches of space outside their little universe, 
are no sentiments that differ from their own, and it is their specially 
ordained mission to see that this condition remains unchanged. Our 
immunity from heaven and its joys is in no small degree due to the 
efforts of this class of reformers. So long as they are controlled by 
a safe grip on the main shaft, their work is done smoothly enough; 
but once broken loose, there is the very devil to pay. The blame 
is ours for not keeping him at home. 



-Grand juries are advanced as the palladiums of civic liberty. 



Next to the Magna Charta they involve those elements of initiative 
that possess the power to environ the community with bulwarks of 
protection and watchtowers of usefulness. They can indict the male- 
factor and investigate all the ramifications of public business. 
Unfortunately there are limits. Otherwise this latest grand jury of 
ours would, beyond words, bring that pernicious association of 
interests, the San Francisco police court, before a real bar of justice, 
rather than before the bar of public opinion. Is the police court a 
law unto itself and can no appeal of honesty or threat of reprisal 
reach it? It would almost seem so, and yet a power must exist some- 
where, if only there were the man or the men to find it. Meanwhile 
we are grateful to the grand jury just passed for at least calling 
attention. 



It is probable that few of the staid and well-fed citizens of 

Oakland appreciate that many times they are practically sitting on a 
live electric wire of many and dangerous electric capacities and that 
only favoring circumstances prevent their involuntary electrocution. 
Up and down the main arteries of that city are poles strung with 
heavy wires charged with high-tension electric currents. Anywhere 
from two to twelve thousand voltage engages these wires. The 
falling and contact of harmless telegraph or telephone wires upon 
the high voltage wires brings into the center of the household the 
dread current. The man who touched his telephone wire recently 
in Oakland and fell back a helpless cripple for life is no myth. The 
telephone company don't think so, for he is suing them for fifty 
thousand dollars. 



And now the Soviet forces have changed their minds (?) 

again, and their commanders are ordered to "keep pushing their 
offensive violently." 



August 7, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



At The Point of The Pelicans 

By Eleanore F. Lewys-Ross. 



The gray pelicans, like hoary-headed grandfathers, with long 
beards resting on their bosoms, circle in languid (lapping flight around 
the point and settle on the rocks where their antecedents had held 
rendezvous centuries agone. 

Grim old cynics, brooding in Sphinx-like silence through the weary 
days, chuckling perhaps softly in their flabby throats at the folly of 
the universe! 

What secrets of the sea could they disclose; the cruel, hungry, 
wolf-fanged sea, dashing against the cliffs, and thrusting long, white, 
swirling, liquid teeth into the rocks at their base; the melting, sun- 
lit lazy sea, breaking into soft, white swishing fringe on the dun 
gray sands; coaxing, caressing, insinuating, prophetic. 
****** 

I had christened her "Maid of the Mist" after my slim-bodied little 
cat boat, and because I had first met her in a blinding fog, that 
blotted out land and sea like a dirty rag drawn over pictures on a 
slate. 

I had been on one of my long cross-country tramps, and was 
trudging homeward over the winding road bordering the cliffs, and 
she had come tearing around a turn in the trail, a wraith of the mist, 
with soaked, wind-swept garments and streaming brown hair, clinging 
around her white face as damp seaweed clings around chalk rocks, 
and then wallowing in dark waves behind. 

Afterward I discovered that her eyes were the eyes of California; 
eyes like the sea, and as changeable in color as its moods. And I 
had gradually fallen in love with her. Not the fickle, "love at first 
sight" one hears of, but seldom experiences; but the deeper, lasting, 
world-forgetting feeling that only an every-day companionship (pro- 
viding two souls are congenial) can create. 

She had lived her short life on the cliffs, the house where she was 
born having housed her ancestors generations before. A gray, 
rambling mansion, nestled among gray-green eucalyptus, cypress and 
pine trees. A place teeming of old-world impressions, ghosts of 
emotions that only the quiet dead could translate. 

Could there be, I wonder, on the whole Pacific Coast, a more 
fascinating, eerie, lonely, tempestuous spot than this Point of the 
Pelicans? 

I lodged in a small town beyond the point, having come there for 
a quiet vacation, and behold, had stalked unknowingly into a dis- 
pensation of circumstances that changed my whole life, my aims, 
ambitions, and desires; even my character itself. 

She told me she loved me. but I looked into her eyes and doubted; 
her gray-blue, yellowish-green eyes of the sea. And this tantalizing 
doubt only drew us the closer. 

And then, our idyl of love experienced a shock that annihilated 
il in one short hour. 

He had come down for the summer, to stay at the old family 
mansion. He was one of her many distant relatives, and as hand- 
some as all her kin-folk were, in a weird, peculiar manner of their 
own. And she told me that he loved her, had always loved her. ever 
since she wis a small thing in pinafores. And then, quite calmly, in 
a passionless, every-day voice, and yet with a glint of the surrounding 
storm in her eyes, she told me that she loved him. and that she was 
tired of me; tired, tired! 

We were walking along the road where we had first met. and the 
night was wild. And a wild night on the "Point of the Pelicans" is 
a leaisome thing. Great whirlpools formed in the rent crevices of 
the rocks, flung in by the mad sea. resistless, passionate, inexorable 
as fate. The wind shrieked in the great trees in tumultuous harmony 



with the sea. Far out on the stormy waters, a yellowish-green band 
of light swelled and disappeared; sickly, wan, menacing, but through 
the different voices of the storm I heard one cry: 

"Kill her! Kill her! Kill her!" 

I drew her out, out to the edge of the cliffs, and her shrieks were 
music to my ears, mingling with the call of the tempest. 

I drew her seaweed hair around her long white* throat, where my 
lips had so often rested; I bent back her head until I looked deep 
into her great green eyes, and then I flung her long, lithe body like a 
mass of dripping kelp into the maelstrom of the sea, of which she was 
conceived! 

fj"* *£• 3fi 9fk 9ft * ■** 

The gray pelicans circle in languid, flapping flight around the point 
and settle on the rocks where their ancestors held rendezvous 
centuries agone. 

Grim old cynics, brooding in Sphinx-like silence through the weary 
days, what secrets of the sea could they disclose? 

Go ask of them. 



The Uncovering of the Covered 

(Continued from Page 5) 

same form in a state of nature! Apparel is a sort of illusion, a veil 
that suggests, that appeals to the imagination more enticingly than 
an unclothed condition. Throw a filmy scarf over a pair of bare 
shoulders, and those shoulders become more fascinating than they 
were before. There is a certain "contrariness" in human nature to 
strive for the unattainable, to grasp at what we cannot reach, to 
sec what is meant to be unseen. A woman walking in long, flowing 
garments becomes the cynosure of all eyes, when the tricky wind 
wantons with her skirts, yet the same woman in short petticoats, 
with a goodly length of limb exposed, would attract but slight 
attention. 

Of course there is a limit of decency to all fashions, but il 
seems lo us that the exposed leg is an honest leg at least, and not 
half as immodest as it was in the "tube" skirts of yesteryear. 

We wonder what the objecting and expostulating clergy would 
say at the sight witnessed the other day by picnickers at Baker's 
Beach, when two young girls went in swimming with only a tiny 
garment like a "breech clout" around their lithe young bodies? 
And calmly dressed themselves on the sands, before the astonished 
gaze of the public? No doubt the aforesaid clergy would have 
expired on the spot! 

Possibly we have Pagan blood in us: perhaps in some remote 
age we disported ourselves in the green glades with Pan. — be that 
as it may. and with all due apologies to our dissenting and very 
much shocked brotherhood, wc cannot help feeling that the only 
occasion when exposure of throats, or limbs or arms seems dis- 
graceful to us. is when the above-mcnlioned members of the 
"human form divine" are unbeautiful. The uncovering of the 
covered will lend, to our minds, lo the beautifying of what has been 
hidden from the sun and air. and undei these new conditions, our 
poor, distorted, flabby, suppressed, too-fat or too-lean bodies may 
perhaps expand and advance into the exquisite creations they were 
meant to be. in the time when the Garden of Eden harbored beauty 
innocent and unadorned. "To the pure, all things are pure!" 



The Allied Flyers' Club will work for any ordinance limiting 

possibilities of accidents while air craft are stunting over cities. We 
are pleased to hear this. Life is precarious enough these days, 
without the fear of air ships falling upon our distracted heads. 



Again Uncle Sam is sending troops to the border, and no 

doubt he will again all them off. just at the psychological M 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 7, 1920 



Gossip of Society 



Miss Ellita Adams is a guest at Tahoe at 
the camp of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hobart and 
Miss Ruth Hobart at San Harbor. 

Mrs. William Delaware Neilson. who has 
been a guest at the Fairmont hotel has left 
town and is motoring in the south. 

Mrs. William L. Hughson has opened her 
summer home in Ross and has with her her 
son-in-law and daughter. Mr. and Mrs. 
Stephen Nemey, for a couple of months. 

Mrs. James E. Haggin, who has been 
visiting in San Francisco as the guest of her 
cousin, Mrs. Frederick Sharon, at the Palace 
hotel, left Tuesday for an extended lour 
through the East. 

Mrs. Jane Selby Hayne and Miss Grace 
Hayne are guests at the Hotel Del Monte. 

Tuesday afternoon the B. S. Revett home 
on Webster street was the scene of an 
informal tea dance, when Miss Frances 
Revett entertained for a group of the mid- 
shipmen. 

At an unusually pretty wedding which 
took place last Saturday evening in the 
Memorial Chapel of Stanford University 
Miss Lola Lee became the bride of Millward 
Hunkin. Miss Ethel Lee, sister of the bride, 
was maid of honor. Mrs. Albert Rice 
Edwards was matron of honor. The five 
bridesmaids were: Mesdumes Mervyn O'Neill, 
Elmer Jennings; Misses Isabelle Jennings, 
Elizabeth Hunkin, Virginia Jurs. Elmer 
Jennings was the best man and the ushers 
included: Messrs. Jack Sellards. Mervin 
O'Neill. Alger Lonabaugh. Albert Rice Ed- 
wards, Everett Young. Robert Duncan. Fol- 
lowing the wedding, there was a reception 
at the Lee home on the Stanford campus. 
After a honeymoon trip, passed motoring 
through California, Mr. and Mrs. Hunkin will 
go to San Diego for about six weeks. They 
will make their future home in Cleveland. 
Ohio. 

Mrs. George Harry Mendcll and Miss 
Louise Janin have returned from Feather 
River Inn. 

The Marin Golf and Country club was the 
scene of many charming groups at luncheon 
Thursday, July 29. Mrs. George Kelham of 
Ross was hostess to about twelve members 
of the Marin county set, entertaining her 
guests with bridge, following luncheon. Those 
who accepted Mrs. Kelham's hospitality in- 
cluded: Mesdames Benjamin Dibblee. 
Frank Bartow Anderson. Frederick Hope 
Beaver, George Boyd, Seward McNear, Ken- 
neth Raleigh Kingsbury, Alexander Lilley. 
Edwin Griffith, Alexander Cuthbertson, Al- 
bert J. Dibblee. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robin Hayne. (Mrs. Ralph 



Williams of Los Angeles), who were mar- 
ried recently in the East, have come to Cali- 
fornia to pass the summer at the Hayne place 
in Montecilo. 

Mr. and Mrs. Aylett R. Cotton of San 
Mateo, with their son, Aylett Cotton, Jr., 
motored south and are visiting in Coronado. 

Henry Hadley, who has been visiting in 
the Bohemian Grove, has returned to town 
and is a guest at the Hotel St. Francis. 

Saturday afternoon, Miss Laura McKinstry 
and a number of her friends gave an in- 
formal tea dance at the Palace hotel for a 
few of the midshipmen, having a number of 
the girls of the younger set present. 

Dr. and Mrs. George Lyman were hosts 
at a delightful dinner dance at their home in 
Redwood last Saturday evening, entertaining 
forty of their friends. 

Miss Helen Crocker joined her family in 
Builingame Tuesday, arriving from New 
York. Miss Crocker has been abroad sev- 
eral months visiting her aunt. Princess 
Poniatowski, in Paris. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Sproule have gone 
to Santa Barbara to be at El Mirasol for a 
few days. Mrs. Sproule has been in Los 
Angeles with Mrs. J. Horace Harding. 

Mr. and Mrs. Julian Thorne gave a dinner 
party last Saturday night in honor of Mr. 
and Mrs. Harry Jenkins who spent the week 
end at the Thorne home at Woodside. 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Crocker enter- 
tained the several hundred visiting midship- 
men and junior officers of the fleet at a tea 
and dance at the Burlingame County club 
on Saturday afternoon from 4 to 7 o'clock. 

One of the principal events on Monday's 
social calendar was the dance which Mr. and 
Mrs. J. Barrett and their daughters. Miss 
Gertiude and Miss Irene Barrett, gave that 
evening at their home on Jackson strcel in 
honor of the visiting midshipmen. 



The engagement is announced in the East 
of Miss Mary Crocker Alexander to Sheldon 
Whitehouse. Miss Alexander is the charming 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Alexan- 
der of New York, and a sister of Mrs. Arnold 
,Whiteridge (Janetta Alexander) and Mrs. 
Winthrop Aldrich (Harriet Alexander). Mrs. 
Alexander is the former Harriet Crocker, a 
sister of William H. Crocker, and the bride- 
elect is a cousin of Countess de Limur (Ethel 
Crocker), Mrs. Malcolm Whitman (Jennie 
Crocker), Miss Helen Crocker and Charles 
Templeton Crocker, all of California. White- 
house, who is connected with the United 
States diplomatic service, is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. William Fitzhugh Whitehouse. He 
attended Eton in England, received his A. B. 
at Yale in 1905, and has served with Ameri- 
can legations in foreign countries. He is a 
member of the Metropolitan, Chevy Chase 
(Washington, D. C), Knickerbocker and 
racquet and tennis clubs of New York. 

Miss Jeanette Riley, who is visiting her 
uncle, aunt and cousins, Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles K. Mcintosh and Miss Aileen and 
Kenneth Mcintosh was the inspiration for a 
delightfully informal dance which Miss Mc- 
intosh gave last Saturday evening at the 
Menlo Country club. 

Mrs. Alexander Hamilton and her tv\o 
daughters, the Misses Grace and Happy 
Hamilton, sailed for the south several days 
ago and are guests at Coronado for the com- 
pany month. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Bothin, who have 
been in Santa Barbara at the Ambassador 
for a brief visit, have returned to their home 
in Ross. 

Philip Paschal and Alfred Holmes, who 
make their home at the Bellevue hotel, ac- 
companied by J. J. Mannon, Jr., left the 
Yosemite Lodge a few days ago and are on 
a hunting and fishing trip in the high Sierra. 
They will be gone about a fortnight. 

Mr. and Mrs. Talbot Walker gave a buffet 
luncheon at their home, "The Gables," in 
Santa Barbara Sunday last in honor of her 
mother, Mrs. James Keeney and her aunt, 
Mrs. George Harding. 



The New Society Blue Book 

Wishes to announce that they are now making ready for press. 
This book will contain the names and addresses, 'phones, etc.. of 
the most prominent families in San Francisco, Alameda Co., 
/Aarin Co, San A\ateo Co.. etc. Also men and women's clubs of 
high social standing. 



S" 1 




For Reservations and Addresses. Communicate With 

Marguerite M. Pinchard, Publisher 

659 £&tason St. 'Phone Franklin 6912 San Francisco. Cat. 

Subscription Price S5.00 Per Year 



August 7, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Mrs. James Knight Prior gave a luncheon 
on Tuesday, July 27, at her summer home in 
Santa Barbara for Congressman and Mrs. 
William Kahn. 

Mrs. William J. Younger, widow of Dr. 
Younger who passed away recently in Paris 
at a venerable age, is returning to make her 
home in this city. Mrs. Younger will be 
accompanied by her daughter, Baroness 
Nugent de Devlin, remembered here as Alice 
Younger. 

Mrs. William Miller Graham and her pretty 
daughter, Miss Geraldine Graham, are here 
from Santa Barbara and are at the Fairmont. 
Informal affairs have added to the pleasure 
of their stay. In October they will return to 
New York to pass the winter. 

William G. Henshaw and his brother. 
Judge Frederick Henshaw, sailed for the 
Orient on Monday to remain for the rest of 
the summer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Clarence Ogden are 
passing their honeymoon touring through the 
Canadian Northwest. 

Mrs. Clara Catherwood Darling has re- 
turned from a fortnight's visit to Paraiso 
Springs and has opened her country place in 
Los Altos, where she will pass the rest of the 
season. 

Commander William C. Van Antwerp en- 
tertained Monday evening at dinner at the 
Pacfic Union club in honor of Harlow Milton 
Pino, midshipman. Pino, by the way. is the 
president of the class of '21 and one of the 
most popular members of his class. Twenty 
of his classmates were also the guests of 
Commander Van Antwerp. Later in the 
evening the host and his guests made a short 
trip from the Pacific Union club to the Fair- 
mont hotel, where they were greeted by a 
bevy of San Francisco's most attractive girls, 
chaperoned by Mrs. Philip E. Bowles, Jr. 
Rainbow Lane was opened for the occasion 
and the young people danced until it was 
time "to shove off for the dock." 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel F. B. Morse, who 
are summering al the Hotel Del Monte, arc 
entertaining as their guest Timothy Callahan. 
a \ isitor in California. 

Mrs. Lester Herrick is visiting friends in 
Seattle, and has been the inspiration for 
many delightful affairs. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray T. Baker and their 
children arc established in their home in 
Lenox for the next two months. They will 
return to Burlingame in October. 

Miss Lorna Williamson was hostess at an 
informal dinner party at her home on Mason 
street Sunday evening, when she enter- 
tained as her guests Misses Anne Peters. 
Claire Knight, \ ere de Vere Adams; Messrs. 
William Veach. Edward Maltby: Midshipmen 
McWilliams. Dupont, O'Donnell. Beard. 

Mrs. Florence Porter Pfingsl left Monte- 
cilo. where she has been visiting as the 
house guest of the George Edward Colemans, 



last Saturday, for Porterville, where she will 
visit her mother, Mrs. John F. Porter, for 
some time before returning to the Fairmont. 

B. E. Puyans, Consul from Cuba, and 
Mrs. Puyans have returned to San Francisco 
after a trip to Havana. 



AT CASA DEL REY 

Many eastern visitors are spending their 
summer months out here at present. A very 
congenial party from Montreal that have 
been up at Yosemite recently, have stopped 
at the Casa Del Rey, taking in the many 
scenic rides around Santa Cruz, including 
Mrs. Thomas Mcintosh, Miss E. Mcintosh. 
Mrs. James Patton and Miss E. Gladys 
Rutherford. 

Mrs. S. Dedrick and her daughter, Miss 
Sarah Dedrick, with R. L. Mochand, from 
Worthington, Minnesota, are making an ex- 
tensive tour through the State, and were 
guests at the Casa del Rey for a week. 

Mr. Max Dill, the well known comedian, 
is spending his vacation with his family at 
the beach at Santa Cruz, making (heir home 
at the Casa del Rey. 

Well known San Franciscans who are re- 
cent arrivals at the hotel, are Mr. and Mrs. 
C. 0. G. Miller with their two sons, 
Robert and Albert. Mr. and Mrs. H. M. A. 
Miller, Mrs. M. N. Letlemich. Prosper Letter- 
nich. Carleton Wall. Mr. and Mrs. A. R. 
Fennimore, and Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Linnard. 



AZTEC STUDIO RE-OPENED BY 
FRANCISCO C0RNEJ0 

Francisco Comejo, the well known artist 
and student of archaeology, has recently re- 
turned from Los Angeles after an absence of 
over three months and has again opened his 
studio of Aztec art at 573 California street. 
The studio, containing many authentic curios 
and works of art from the Ancient City of the 
Aztecs is open to the public on Thursday and 
Saturday afternoons. Mr. Comejo recently 
spent several weeks in the South arranging 
and creating the famous Aztec ballet 
"Xocheetel" which will be produced under 
the auspices of Ted Shawn the master 
dancer. Among the exhibited works of art 
at the Comejo studio is a genuine Van Dyck 
painting valued at over $10,000. The studio 
annex contains an exact reproduction of the 
Royal Throne room of the Aztecs carried out 
in exact replica of furniture and decoration 
to the most minute detail. Down under the 
shadow of tall buildings and busy streets the 
studio, like an uncrippled eddy in the whirl- 
ing river of commerce, furnishes a peculiar 
contrast with its somber simplicity and 
legendary objects of interest. 



DANCING,— THE LEGACY OF THE AGES 

In the olden days of the Missions in Cali- 
fornia, we associate the Spanish Fandangoes 
and Castanet dances with the romance of 
the Coast history, and today dancing is the 
same joyous interpretation of sprightly spirits 
as it was in the years past. After the theatre 
at Techau Tavern, a laughing throng of 
merry makers saunter over the polished floor 
between dances, chatting and intermingling 
with their friends. Then — a note or two. the 
music begins, and round the couples drift 
with that sofl swishing sound that never fails 
to thrill the enthusiastic dancer. And br- 
tucen the dances, the attractive revue, with 
its lively songs and gay costumes, claims the 
plaudits of the patrons. After the theatre. 
• lance is a lucky one. Hilson's toggery 
orders and Mclachrino cigarettes being given 
■way, which induces both young and old to 
"trip the light fantastic." 



A. B. HARRISON & COMPANY 
HAVE MOVED 

A great extension in their business has 
forced A. B. Harrison & Company to secure 
more commodious quarters. On August I- 
they moved to 228 Montgomery stree' 
ground floor of the Mills building. 
Harrison & Company are one of the 1 
realty firms in this city. 



At any rate, the prophecies of lower prices 
make cheerful reading. — Providence Journal. 



— There are many garages in town and the 
motorist is often in a quandary as to where 
to go, especially for permanent service. 
There arc very few who give you the quality 
of service of Dow & Green, on Taylor street. 
It lucen O'Farrcll and Geary. Here your car 
will recei\e something more than the "once 
over." and the prices are moderate. 



THE 



PALACE HOTEL 



S 



for 



ervice 

atisfaction 

miles 



A WONDERFULLY EFFECTIVE 
COMBINATION 

Management of 
HALSEY E. MANWARING 



DR. WM. W. HOAGLAND 

DENTIST 

i-SRFf 

OHicei. 908 Market Si .Third Floor 
TELEPHONE GARFIELD 835 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 7. 1920 



Rodeo Recalls California's Golden Days 

(A Del Monte Letter) 



Over in the valley of the waving wheat 
and not far from Del Monte, the California 
of the Golden Days has been re-embodied for 
a brief space during the week just ended. 
Color and dramatic action have fascinated 
and swayed 10,000 people as one. Social 
standing has no place at a rodeo; those who 
make much ot it temporarily forgot it, left it 
locked inside their high-priced, chauffeur- 
driven limousines, became, for the nonce, 
entities of a crowd out to be thrilled and 
amused. 

Sherwood Field, on the outskirts of Sa- 
linas, has been the scene of unwonted eques- 
trian and bovine activities. Hundreds of 
cow ponies, of good and bad reputation, 
each and all entering into the spirit that dom- 
inates a rodeo, have raced helter skelter 
hither and yon, their gaily bedecked riders 
yelling clarion cowboy calls in sheer exuber- 
ance of spirits. 

Four hundred cowboys and cowgirls ap- 
propriately attired, some of them with the 
blood of old Spain coursing hotly through 
their veins, inaugurated the annual Salinas 
rodeo by parading through the main streets 
of that picturesque little city and out to 
Sherwood Field. They rode four abreast, 
and the sight of this prancing, curvetting 
host brought back to blase beholders all that 
they had ever read of the Golden Days that 
are supposed to be no more. 

At the head of this brightly appareled 
cavacalde rode a 90-year-old patriarch, 
sitting astride his mettlesome steed with all 
the sangfroid of a youthful vaquero. Gray- 
bearded, erect as any twenty-year-old, El 
Viejo, as they called him, might have been 
taken for some Spanish hidalgo leading his 
retainers into the nearby hills for the annual 
round-up, to count and brand his cattle 
gathered together from out a hundred shady 
coulees, from off the sloping sides of two- 
score bare and sun-browned hills. 

Sherfield Field reached, the paraders 
broke up into little companies, to talk over 
rodeos past and those to come. The band, 
meanwhile, played haunting airs of old 
Spain and old Mexico, with American jazz 
trimmings. Spectators looked on from 
grandstands and sidelines in expectation of 
the many thrills to come. Nor were they 
disappointed. Thrills there were a-plenty, 
hairbreadth escapes from death on the points 
of lowered horns backed by onrushing ton- 
and-a-half toros, puzzled indignant bulls 
brought in from the back country, brought to 
town and into the hurly burly of modern 
civilization from out a medieval calm to 
make a Monterey Peninsula holiday. 



Guests from Del Monte rubbed elbows 
with lanky, keen-eyed, clear-visioned, wind- 
bronzed, sun-tanned men of the hills and the 
valleys, men to whom the annual Salinas 
rodeo was the high spot card in the deck 
that goes to make up life as she is lived on 
the great California ranches. Side by side 
with the smartest of smart gowns and male 
attire bearing the labels of high-priced aris- 
tocrats of the tailoring kingdom, one beheld 
for contrast shirts of sea-green, of lupin- 
purple, of combative carmine, of sunset ce- 
rise, of Chinese yellow, shirts all of the very 
finest of silk, shirts that, taken as a whole, 
made a kaleidoscope of color that would 
have been riotous if seen on Broadway, New 
York, or an Broadway, Philadelphia, shirts 
of the most costly that were, after all is said 
and done, in entire harmony with the 
occasion that brought them and their eye- 
staggering colors together. 

All this against the brown background of 
sun-parched hills was a sight, once seen, 
never to be forgotten, a sight to be recalled 
in days to come when the cowboys and cow- 
girls of this present generation are one with 
their many predecessors, who now ride herd 
throughout the enpurpled night after ghostly 
cattle that bed down in the land of mists and 
memories that is said to lie in the Great 
Beyond. 

More than any other part of California, 
Monterey Peninsula is peculiarly favored in 
that its ever-glorious past is so often pro- 
jected into its magnificent present. 

For instance, that young vaquero, speak- 
ing only broken English, was born over 
yonden beyond those sun-kissed mountains. 
He is a native Californian if ever there was 
one. Save for the sombreness of his attire, 
a studied sombreness, he is typical of all 
vaqueros, and of the Golden Days. The 
house he was born in, over in that secluded 
valley, is of adobe; his grandfather was 
born there, too. Its windows are barred, its 



floors are of hard packed dirt, it is red-tiled 
of roof, its windows and door frames are 
painted a robin's egg blue, its massive walls 
are gray, yet he would not exchange it for 
the finest of Fifth Avenue mansions with 
its bronze doors, its tapestry hung chambers 
■ — not he! Frijoles and tortillas and tamales 
and enchiladas, delectable dishes when 
cooked by a wrinkled, wispy-haired 100- 
year-old retainer, are everyday fare for him. 
No Lucullan banquet can compare with his 
evening comida, eaten out in the patio may- 
be, or in the big square sala when the day's 
work is done. 

Watch him as he approaches the master of 
ceremonies, who happens to be an American. 
The young vaquero is about to ask per- 
mission of El Senor Gringo to take part in 
an old-time Californian rodeo; not that per- 
mission is necessary but as a matter of inatc 
courtesy that is bred in the bone. How 
gracefully he doffs his broad-brimmed som- 
brero! It is the spirit of Old Spain in which 
Monterey Peninsula is steeped; it is the spirit 
of Old California that still is abroad in this 
most favored of lands. Even the blase 
visitor from New York, Chicago, London. 
Paris, Petrograd — and they are there — is im- 
pressed by it. 

This young vaquero, owner by inheritance 
of twice ten thousand acres and many, many 
cattle, is a symphony in black, relieved by 
bright, even brilliant, touches here and there. 
He is California of the Golden Days personi- 
fied; Golden Days that Del Monte's guests 
who attended this rodeo — and they were 
many — wish were back again, because of 
their romance, their naturalness, their un- 
surpassed courtesy, their pricelessness. 

Alas! — say some — those Golden Days are 
no more, will never come again, excepting 
during rodeo days, and these come but once 
a year, more's the pity! 

But they are wrong. The spirit of those 
Golden Days is with us yet, even amid the 
humdrum hurly burly of modern civilization. 
As the Spaniards and Mexicans put it. and as 
every Californian, whether native born or 
adopted, puts it, these Golden Days will 
never die, will live forever, in memory at 
least. 



Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

SPECIALIZES IN 

TAR SHAMPOOS 

MR. and MRS. A. F. COSQROVE 

TELEPHONE KEARNY 2842 



August 7, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



II 



In the Realm of Bookland 



Great Artist a Best Seller 

The remark of a Philadelphia bookseller, 
"At last we have a best seller. The life saver 
is Joseph Conrad's 'The Rescue,' " goes far 
toward shattering the age-old superstition 
that a real artist can never be a best seller. 
Yet it is true that for years Conrad was 
caviar to the many. While critics were 
exalting him as one of the greatest living 
stylists the general reader held aloof. It 
must then be some other element in his books 
which has won him the interest of the multi- 
tude who read and are responsible for best 
sellers. The Chicago Journal believes thai 
most critics fail to stress the fact that Conrad 
tells a "corking story" and exalt mastery of 
language at the expense of more important 
qualities. 

"Conrad was a thinker before he was a 
writer," says the Journal. "He is an un- 
rivalled explorer of the mysterious recesses 
of human nature, but he explores so well 
because, like Dr. Livingstone, he goes so 
well equipped to understand and explain 
what he finds. He mixes his spiritual travels 
as the painter in the anecdote mixed his 
colors, 'with brains, sir.' To read Conrad is 
to lake a journey to lands interesting in 
themselves, and made doubly so by the aid 
of a guide who is likewise philosopher and 
friend. 

"There is another gift of Conrad's which 
comes in (or still less critical notice, the gift 
of story telling. Thousands of readers have 
been frightened away by essays on Conrad's 
introspection and polished style who nevei 
hear of his ability to tell a rattling good tale. 
His short stories — so-called — show this nar- 
rative gilt at its height. 'The Inn of the Two 
Witches' is as perfect in plot and form as 
anything ever done by Poe; 'The Dud' is a 
marvelous study of the interweaving of affec- 
tion and enmity, but it is likewise what 
Roosevelt would have called a 'perfectly 
corking story.' " 



A Poor Prophet 

That knowledge is not always a good DMH 
of prophecy. Stewart Edward White illus- 
trates in "Moisture a Trace," a whimsical 
tale of "dry" Arizona and calico that cost 
three dollars a yard, one of the stories in his 
new book. "The Killer" (Doubleday. Page & 
CompcUD) ) Arizona went dry. It w 
unbelievable phenomenon. 

"In the old days." said White. "I used to 
shul my eyes and project my soul into what 

1 imagined w;<s the future. I s.m Arizona, 
emboltled. dying in the last wet ditch, while 
all the rest of the world, even including Mil- 



waukee bore down on her carrying the ban- 
ners of prohibition. So much for prophecy." 



Appleton Book Notes 

Dr. G. Stanley Hall's important work en- 
titled "Morale; the Supreme Standard of Life 
and Conduct, " will be published by D. 
Appleton 6k Company next week. In the 
book a working standard of life is applied 
to every sphere of human activity. The 
analysis includes the application of the 
standard of morale to the social, economic, 
political, educational and religious field. This 
standard is, in Dr. Hall's estimation, the cri- 
terion by which to measure every human 
institution. 

In George Madden Martin's book, "The 
Children in the Mist," published by D. 
Appleton & Company, appear many words 
strange to the white man, such as "Hoodoo," 
"Cunjuh" and "Tricking." These belong to 
the past of the black man and are infre- 
quently met with nowadays. The modern 
negro, averse to all that differentiates him 
from the dominant race, is leaving these 
words behind him, and only unwillingly can 
be brought to give information on the sub- 
ject. In discussing the question Mrs. Martin 
said: "It could be wished that some edu- 
cated member of the negro race might be 
induced to compile a definite volume about 
these matters, since the time is almost gone 
when the sources of such information, the 
surviving older people, will be at hand." 

Probably not many of the thousands of 
readers who have enjoyed "The Portygee" 
and the other famous Cape Cod novels of 
Joseph C. Lincoln, know that the author won 
his first literary recognition as a writer of 
humerous and homely verse. There is. 
nevertheless, a steadily growing demand for 
Lincoln's book of \crse "Cape Cod Ballads." 
and the Appletons announce that the eighth 
edition is now being printed. 

A:, the fall juvenile season approaches, 
Appleton's, the leading publisher of books 
for boys, announce these various printings of 
old favorites: The sixth printing of Ralph 
Henry Barbour's "Spirit of the School" and 
the twentieth printing of his "Captain of the 
Crew," the seventeenth printing of Molly 
Elliot Seawell's "Decatur and Somers." the 
sixth printing of A. Frederick Collins' "Book 
of Stars." the sixth printing of Cole St Ernst's 
First Aid for Boys," the tenth printing of 
Joseph A. Allsheler's "Scout of the Valley." 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Sts. 
Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without 
dining in the finest cafe in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner $1.75 



CLOCK 
REPAIRING 




ALL MAKES 
OF CLOCKS 
REPAIRED 



WATCH DEPARTMENT 
Chimes and complicated clocks a specially 
Clocks kept in order by contract, town and 

country 

We carry an attractive line of new clocks 

Work guaranteed in every detail 

CALIFORNIA CLOCK CO. 

418-19 Whitney Bldg. 133 Geary Street 

Phone Garfield 2570 J. Topping, Manager 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 

PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 
Offices— 505-507— 323 Geary Street 

Phone Douglas 2433 



The dollar can ne\er fall as low as the 
means some people adopt to get it. — Green- 
ville (S. C.) Piedmont. 



SUMMONS 
105936 
In the Superior Court of the Slate of California 
in and for the City and Counly of San Francisco. 
Olga Elizabeth Knnis. Plaintiff, 

vs. * 

lohn Cradock Fnnis, Defendanl. 

Action brought in ihe Superior Court of ihe 
Slate of California in and for ihe Cily and County 
of San Francisco, and (he complaint filed in the 
office of the Counly Clerk of said Cily and County. 
The people of ihe Stale of California send greet- 
ing to John Cradock Knnis and Mrs. J. Avrillaud. 
Defendants. 

Yo« are hereby required to appear in an action 
brought against you by the above named Plaintiff in 
tie Superior Court of the Slale of California, in 
and for the City and Counly of San Francisco, and 
to answer the Complaint filed therein within len days 
Inclusive of ihe day "f servicr) after ihe service on 
this summons, if served within this City and 
. or if served elsewhere within thirty days. 
The said action >• brought to obtain a judgment 
and decree of thi* Court dissolving the bonds of 
matrimony now existing between plaintiff and de- 
fendant, on the ground of defendanl John Cradock 
r.nnis' adultery wilh Mid Mrs. J. Avrillaud. and of 
■■■•n Cradock EnnV desertion of plaintiff, also 
»eral relief, as uill more fully appear in the 
Complaint on file, to which special reference is 
hereby made. 

And you are hereby notified that, unless you ap- 
pear and an- * -e required, the said Plain- 
tenl for my moneys or damages 
mplain' as arising upon contract, 
to the Co t for any other relief de- 
i*-d in the Complaint. 
-i under my hand »nd the Seal of the Super- 
ior Court of the State of California, in and for the 
d County of San Ffiodsco, this 1 5th day of 

'• D 

H. I ML1 CRFVY. Clerk. 
By L. J. WELCH. Deputy Clerk 

Frank D. Macbeth. 50ft Humboldt Bank Bid 
Francisco. CaL Attorney for Plaintiff. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 7, 1920 



A REALLY SELF-MADE MAN 

In the life story of David Hale Fanning, 
who celebrated his ninetieth birthday on 
the fourth of August, we visualize the self- 
made man of whom America has so often, 
and with reason, boasted, as a sort of 
peculiar product of her own. 

When the fair sex buy any of the three 
renowned makes of corsets — the Bon Ton. 
the Royal Worcester, or the Adjusto, it 
might arouse a special interest in the pur- 
chase, if they could know that the originator 
of these corsets, at the age of sixteen, left 
his home in a small Connecticut village in 
the year 1846, with a pack tied up in the 
proverbial bandana over his shoulder, and 
barely two dollars in his pocket, to achieve 
fame in the big world so far away from his 
little birthplace. 

Today marks the culmination for Mr. 
Fanning, of sixty years as president and - 
managing head of a great corporation, — the 
Royal Worcester Corset Company. From 
a small start with two girl helpers in a single 
room, he succeeded in perfecting the hoop- 
skirts which were in fashion from I860 to 
1865. We try not to hold this against Mr. 
Fanning, because from this fad grew the de- 
sire to manufacture corsets, and at present 
his huge business in this line occupies a 
whole city block. The distribution of Bon 
Ton corsets is practically world-wide, reach- 
ing from the United States to the Transvaal, 
from Great Britain to Ceylon, and the three 
styles which Mr. Fanning has created in 
corsets, have justly become world-famous. 



MR. E. R. ROLPH APPOINTED MANAGER 
OF MINNEAPOLIS HOTELS 

San Francisco has lost a valuable hotel 
man, when Mr. E. A. Rolph. formerly with 
the Argonaut hotel of this city, and manager 
of the St. Marx hotel at Oakland, leaves for 
Minneapolis, to take up the management of 
the Hotel Radison. and the Elgin hotel, both 
of which are in that city. He will soon con- 
duct the famous Radison Inn. located at 
Christmas Lake. Minn., the latter being the 
largest summer resort in the Northwest. 
Whenever a good hotel man is needed in the 
East or Middle West, San Francisco seems to 
be the loser. 



MR. BENJAMIN S. TERRY PASSES ON 

Mr. Benjamin S. Terry, president of the 
A. M. Harris Oil Company of Providence. 
R. I., passed away on Tuesday, July 13, 
1920. Mr. Terry was very popular on this 
Coast, being genial and democratic, and his 
death came as a shock to his many friends. 
not only in this part of the country, but in 
the East as well, while many were the ex- 
pressions of sympathy received by his be- 
reaved family. 



AT EASE 

Miss Stayabed is passing wroth: 

She wails that cooks are hard to get — 

Yet when obtained, they burn the broth, 
Break plates, and all the food upset. 

Miss Stayabed is rather peeved 

That not a seamstress can she cite. 

Whose promises may be believed 
And who can do a dress up right. 



Miss Stayabed protests with heat 

'Gainst lady's maids who try her soul ; 
They're never prompt, she says, or neat. 
And oh, so hopeless to control ! 

Alas, it seems Miss Stayabed 

Will never comfort know 
Until the thought pervades her head 

She, too. might cook and dress and sew! 
— A. Burstein in Munsey's. 



August 



in the 

High Sierra 

— Perfect for Life Outdoors 

Yosemite — 
Lake Tahoe— 

Sequoia and 
Gen. Grant Parks 

Kings and Kern 
Rivers Canyons— 

Huntington Lake- 
Shasta Region. 

Trail-Riding 

^Mountain Climbing- Fishing Hunting 

Comfortable Hotels Well-Equipped Camps 

Reduced round trip season tickets on sale daily. Still lower round trip fares Fridays and 
Saturdays, return limit 1 5 days. 

1 ot illustrated folder. "Outdoor Life in the Sierras," or "Outing Resorts" booklet, write 
Chas. S. Tee, Pass. Trf. Mgr., 65 Market St., San F'rancisco, Cal. 

Southern Pacific Lines 




L. E. PENNIMAN 

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA DISTRIBUTOR OF 

Ensign Carburetors 

605 VAN NESS AVENUE 
Near Turk St. San Francisco 

PHONE PROSPECT 5610 



August 7, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



Pleasure's Wand 

"We Obey No Wand But Pleasure's" 
By "Casu." 



Columbia — Anderson's "Frivolities of 1920. 

With the able assistance of Mr. J. C. 
Huffman, a man who certainly knows how, 
Mr. G. M. Anderson has produced a won- 
derful show. That is a very much over- 
worked word nowadays, but it can be used 
with all suitability when speaking of the 
"Frivolities of 1920," which is just that, — 
wonderful. The costumes, the music, the 
lyrics and the scenic effects are all executed 
with such art and skill that they reach the 
point where one can only exclaim, 
"Wonderful!" 

Richard Bold, as the blase clubman, first 
found glooming over the times we live in 
when the merry stream of bright red wine no 
longer flows, is visited by Mephisto who 
assures him that there is still much joy in the 
world, and he is ready to prove to the club- 
man that life itself is intoxicating, full of 
thrills, balmy with beauty. Like Faust, the 
young man is willing to be shown, whereupon 
the girls begin to arrive. Happiness, Beauty, 
Sorrow and some more human emotions, in 



female form and symbolic costumes, walk be- 
fore him. Dance, Youth, Song, entice him. 
Each of the ten "frivols," as the scenes are 
well named, is a masterpiece, picturesque and 
musical. However did they get so many 
pretty girls together? Not surprising, that 
deafening applause from the upper parts of 
the theatre that causes us to turn and look, 
and see hundreds of bright young "middies" 
from the Eastern fleet. 

"My Frivolity Girl" and "In Lovers' Lane" 
sung by Mr. Bold were enthusiastically re- 
ceived, and Henry Lewis in "Squidgulums" 
was hard to part with; he is at the height of 
the singing comedian's popular success. In 
"Omar, the Wine-maker," the fun grows fast 
and furious and the scene is the most beauti- 
ful one of them all. "The Farmerettes," 
"Pretty Polly," "Peacock Alley" — just one 
musical treat after another. And when the 
girls dash down among the audience, the coy 
behavior of some of our leading citizens 
(those who had their wives along) arouses 
much mirth. Of the many splendid choruses. 



the one in "A Scene in Spain" makes 
brightest memory. 

"At Eton College, England" we have de- 
lightful dancing, but the sturdy little chaps 
of the real Eton would never recognize their 
historic habiliments. 

"Military Wedding of the Nations" wound 
up the magnificently staged and well-acted 
performance. A performance that is much 
more joyous to see than to read about. 

© © © , 
Fun at the Orpheum. 

There are times when one feels that noth- 
ing will do but vaudeville. A continued play, 
with the necessary waits, has no appeal. On 
such an evening, a Monday evening usually 
it is, after a week-end out of town and a 
busy day to make up for it, there's no place 
like the Orpheum. Mr. Raymond Bone starts 
off briskly with "The Haunting Rag" and 
gets us all in the spirit of the evening. Then 
comes "A Chinese Circus" and then Edna 
Showalter with her sparkling voice and 
dazzling diamonds, and she sings "For You 
'Tis But a Rose" in a very cheery manner 
whereas that has always been rather a sad 
little song to me. But there is absolutely no 
place for anything even approaching gloom 
at the Orpheum this week. Eccentric Will 
Mahoney, with all of his clothes on back- 
ward, would make the gravest of us giggle 



- . .„;///,■// ■ »/ ■ . ■ >>> ■ : ■■■ ■ ' . • 'i .:, ■ , •■ ,, ■ , ■ ,: ■ ;—„:. • 



,,, ,, ,, . 



-' -' vWA' ^AVA'/T/T 



■,r,„rs/rr,rrr/tsrismss////fSSS/fSS//SSSM//S///WS///S///////S/SS/S//. 




A heath of good old* southern atmosphere will regale Orpheurr 
Campbell will he seen in "C Days" with 

of singers anj actors. 



next week when Georgia 



.■s,s„s,sssss. . . s _L \ 



14 



and Yates and Reed are worth seeing again, 
though that doleful ditty of the delights of 
drunkenness palls somewhat. It produces 
loud applause, however, from a large .portion 
of the audience, mostly flabby looking gentle- 
men with reminiscent expressions. 

I do like a one-act play. Even so light a 
thing as "Mrs. Wellington's Surprise" has 
great attraction. People ought to write more 
one-act plays; clever people, I mean. Some 
one about mid-way between Lord Dunsany 
and this George Kelly, let us say. 

Frank Dobson's big act could be described 
as "An Earnest Exponent of Jazz, Entirely 
Surrounded by Beautiful Girls." Action, 
action, action, that's Dobson's slogan, and he 
lives up to it very minute, with coattails 
flying, nimble legs doing incredible things, 
mellow voices booming, agile arms embrac- 
ing, ready wit sparkling, just crowds of 
hearty, irresistible laughs. Small wonder that 
Frank's immaculate tall collar showed signs 
of wilting toward the end — there were collars 
among his audience also breaking down 
under the strain. Jean Mann, who appears 
to capture the fickle affections of this gay 
philanderer, is a lovely creature; she has a 
good voice, too. 

Bevan and Flint, a gorgeous black-haired 
beauty, and a very plain little funny man, 
added much to the merriment of the evening, 
with their skit called a "Slight Interruption." 

A particularly interesting International 
Weekly ended the program. 
3 ® 9 
Farce at the Alcazar 

Eight members of the Alcazar company 
(the particular favorites of the public, I 
think, these eight delightful people) give 
Avery Hopwood's merry little farce, "Fair 
and Warmer" this week. The play is well 
constructed and the situations bring out all 
of the comedy qualities of the actors. One 
likes Emily Pinter better each time one sees 
her. I hear that she will not be with us long. 
Miss Ragan's pleasant humor is always wel- 
come, and her charm is unfailing. An at- 
tractive twain, she and Dudley Ayres, who 
as "Jack Wheeler" makes her a good hus- 
band in one sense of the old-fashioned 
phrase, if not in another. For Rafael Bru- 
netto to play a part the name of which is 
"Harrigan," of course leaves me without a 
single comment. And after all I've said, 
too! Ben Erway is excellent opposite Miss 
Pinter. Henry Shumer gave another strong, 
proof of his versatility. He seemed to enjoy 
the part of Pete Mealy and assuredly his 
audience did. 

Q E9 ® 

Curran — Jane Cowl in "Smilin' Through" 

An unusual engagement, and one of which 
San Franciscans are eagerly availing them- 
selves, is the Selwyn play "Smilin' Through" 
with Jane Cowl and a strong company, at the 
Curran for a fortnight. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

The play is of absorbing interest and is 
well staged, full of beautiful pictures that 
will long delight the memory. The star's 
exquisite beauty, her perfect voice and her 
genius, have carried her to a place in her 
bright career where London, the Mecca of 
the actor-folk, is clamoring for her and this 
play with the strong spiritualistic tendency. 
London is keenly interested just now in the 
occult. It is always appreciative of a great 
actress, which Jane Cowl is. Its anti- 
American feeling is brushed aside in this 
case. Many American players have suffered 
from this opposition. 

Every moment that Miss Cowl is on the 
stage is a moment full of pleasure. Ethelbert 
Hales was well known in San Francisco ten 
years ago and his acting is admirable. 
David Torrence, his boon companion of the 
p|ay, does good work. 

* # •':'• 

A Good Actor 

My nice flower-stall young man in Grant 
avenue brightens up the gayest early-morn- 
ing with that smile of his. He polishes the 
entrance of the shop on whose sidewalk he 
sells his lively wares, this by way of paying 
his rent, no doubt, and whether its a mop or 
a dahlia that he's waving, always his eyes 
are roving over the passing crowd. The way 
they pick me out and twinkle at me, and the 
debonair salute with the hat raised high, 
always pleases me enormously. This is no 
commercial courtesy, mind you, for I seldom 
stop to buy. Our acquaintance began five 
years ago when I first came to San Francisco 
and was having all those delighteful. excited 
thrills "1 he City" fills newcomers with. I 
was going about with a camera trying to get 
as much of it as I could catch, and I saw the 
gay flower stand, radiant In the sunshine, 
with its no less radiant owner stepping lightly 
round it. like a large Italian butterfly hover- 
ing over the blooms. "Do let me photograph 
this," I said to him, with a motion of the 
camera toward his flowers. A friendly smile 
iil up his face, and dropping the roses he was 
bunching, he hurriedly but deftly settled his 
tie and stepped out in the middle of the 
front of the stand, placed a hand with care- 
less grace on a hip. and with all the pleasure 
in the world he posed for me. We've been 
friends ever since. 



Advance Announcements 

At the Orpheum Next Week 

All the requirements of good vaudeville 
seem to be welded into the show which will 
make its appearance at the Orpheum next 
Sunday. 

Miss Georgia Campbell, who forsook a dig- 
nified circle of exclusive society folk of 
Washington. D. C, to embark upon a pro- 
fessional career four years ago. will head- 
line in her picturesque song offering, "Gone 



August 7. 1920 

Are the Days." An old Southern mansion 
set in the foliage of the Mississippi river 
bank will be the scene. With this attractive 
situation. Miss Campbell and her four asso- 
ciates. Robert Buchanan, Archie Ruggles and 
George Sutton, will recollect the songs of 
other days until a dream of the old South 
will be depicted. Much interesting material 
is woven into the cycle of setting, plot and 
song which will add a lustre to the act, it is 
announced. 

George Austin Moore, famous for his songs 
and stories, is another notable artist. Moore 
blends his ability as a racounteur and 
vocalist with good effect. He was with the 
first unit of entertainers to sail overseas to 
amuse men in service and his act will be 
flavored with the doughboy enthusiasm he 
acquired when over there. 

I he Harry Hayden company in a romantic 
comedy entitled "The Love Game" will de- 
pict this international sport as it is played in 
real life. The cast includes Harry Hayden, 
Scott Moore, Eloise Murray and Virginia 
Marseillius. 

Dooley and Storey, a recently formed part- 
nership, following the close of a production, 
will win more honors with their "vaudeville 
a la carte." 

Elizabeth Nelson and the Barry Boys are 




J OvipW^&vaut t * 



AJ^Next Week-Starting Sunday 

6E0R6IA CAMPBELL 

DOOLEY .t STOREY 



GEORGE 

AUSTIN MOORE 



THE HARRY 
HAYDEN COMPANY 



ELIZABETH NELSON :. . . ■ 1 THE HARRY HOY S 
HAYATAKE BROS. THE I'AKMH.r.Ys 



I NTERNATIONAL N E WS : Tnpir'S OK THE DAY 
ORl li I T IT QUI 1IKSTRA 

FRANK DOBSON »...t .... THIRTEEN SIRENS 

Matin 25c tc- 7fic Evi i insa— 25c i<» $1 

coptSa Bunda] - and Holidays) 
M ITINEH DAILY— Phone r ,■ 

DO NOT PATRONIZE TICKET 8UALPEE8 

TRY THE ORl'HEI-.M S FAMILY CIRCLE 

ALCAZAR 

THIS WEEK ONLY-FEVER HEAT FARCE 
"FAIR AND WARMER" 
K. COM. NEXT SUN. MAT.. AUG 8 
I- ust Time Here of George Broadhurst's New York 
Mystery Melodrama Sensation Based on Octavus 
Roy Cohen's Thrilling Story 

"THE CRIMSON ALIBI" 

"The First Detective Play Thai Fools All ihe 

Lobby Guessers." — N. Y. Tribune. 

THE ALCAZAR COMPANY 

DUDLEY AYRES— INEZ RAGAN 

SUNDAY MAT. AUG 15 — Brilliant Comedy 
Jesse Lynch Williams' Slashing Social Satire 

"WHY MARRY?" 

Nal Goodwin's Final and Crowning Triumph. 

SOON-Demand Revival-'PFG O MY HEAR! 

Every Evening. Mais. — Sun.. Thurs.. Sat. 



August 7, 1920 

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE 
STATE OF CALIFORNIA. IN AND FOR 
THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN 
FRANCISCO. 
In the Matter of the Application of SOUTHER 
FREIGHT HANDLING AND STEVEDOR- 
DORING COMPANY for a change of its 
Corporate Name to SOUTHER WARE- 
HOUSE COMPANY. No. 108448. Dent. 16. 
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE WHY AP- 
PLICATION FOR CHANGE OF NAME 
SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED. 

Souther Freight Handling and Stevedoring Com- 
pany, the said corporation, and Kenneth Monteagle 
and A. T. Gibson, a majority of the Directors 
thereof, having filed and presented an application 
that the name of said Souther Freight Handling and 
Stevedoring Company be changed to Souther Ware- 
house Company. 

IT IS HEREBY ORDERED that all persons 
interested in said matter appear before the Superior 
Court of the State of California in and for the City 
and County of San Francisco, Department 16 
thereof, at the City Hall, No. 400 Van Ness 
Avenue, in said City and County on Monday the 
30th day of August, 1920, at the hour of 10 
o'clock A. M., or as soon thereafter as counsel can 
be heard, to show cause why such application for 
change of name should not be granted- 

AND IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that 
notice of said application and of this order be given 
by publication of a copy of this order in The San 
Francisco News Letter, a newspaper of general 
circulation, printed and published in the said City 
and County of San Francisco, Stale of California, 
once a week for four successive weeks before said 
hearing. 

Dated this 22d day of July, 1920. 

BERNARD. J. FLOOD. 
Judge of the Superior Court. 

ENDORSED 

Filed July 22, 1920. 

H. I. MULCREVY. Clerk. 
By L. J. WELCH, Deputy Clerk. 
MONTEAGLE & RIXFORD. 

Attorneys for Applicant. 

14 Montgomery Street. San Francisco. Cat. 



A. B. HARRISON 

REAL ESTATE 

On Account of Increasing Business 
and Needing Larger Quarters 

MOVED 

From 157 Montgomery St. 
TO 

228 Montgomery St. 

Ground Floor, Mills Building 



Potted Plants 
and Ferns 

OF DISTINCTION 
SUITABLE FOR ANY 

OCCASION AT NURSERY 
PRICES 

Bay Counties Seed Co. and 

Nurseries 

•404 Market Street, San Francisco 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

scheduled to produce a medley of vaudeville 
hits. Miss Nelson will provide the athletics 
while the comedy and dance will be inter- 
polated by the Barry Boys. 

Hayataka Brothers with an exposition of 
athletics, Japanese style, and the Parshleys 
with enormous tympanies, drums and xylo- 
phones, will remain one more week. Topics 
of the Day, .pictorial events and orchestra 
will provide other program numbers. 
© © © 

Alcazar Announcement 

'Fair and Warmer" gives place next Sun- 
day at the Alcazar to the thrills and quiver- 
ing suspense of "The Crimson Alibi," the 
latest George Broadhurst melodrama, based 
upon Octavus Roy Cohen's vivid magazine 
story. It recently finished a long run at 
Broadhurst's own New York theatre, and is 
spick and span new on the Pacific Coast. 

Joshua Quincy, a cordially hated million- 
aire, is seen stricken by an unknown hand 
at midnight in the pantomimic prologue. 
Then through four gripping acts, suspicion 
wavers from one to another of a dozen 
suspects. An expert, high quality cast in- 
cludes Dudley Ayres as the amateur student 
of criminology; Inez Ragan as the loyal 
girl with fighting spirit; Brady Kline, her ex- 
convict lover; Beri Erway, an underworld 
lad; Al Cunningham and Frederick Green, 
police officers; Henry Shumer, an elderly 
scholar; Emily Pinter, a young matron; 
Gladys Emmons, her sister: Emelie Melville 
and Rafael Brunetto, the Quincy house- 
keeper and butler; Murray Barnard, a 
society wastrel, and Stella Warfield. the pro- 
prietress of a crooks' resort. 

Another abrupt change Sunday, August 
15. brings Jesse Lynch Williams' dazzling 
comedy and social satire, "Why Marry?" 
flailing with keen wit and brilliant epi- 
grams, touching the divorce volcano now in 
perpetual state of eruption. It was in this 
remarkable comedy that the late Nat 
Goodwin was stricken at the height of the 
greatest triumph of his erratic career. 



15 



REASONABLE PRICES AT MARQUARDS 

It is a most unusual occurrence in these 
daj I of the high cost ot living, to find a 
first class restaurant serving an excellent 
luncheon for the small amount of fifty cents. 
Imagine twenty-six "feature dishes" await- 
ing your fancy among the Business Men's 
Resdy-to-Servc specials, at Marquard's. at 
the corner of Geary and Mason streets! 

Do you think you could do any bette 
than that, if you combed the old town with 
the greatest diligence? 











Comparisons 

Only Emphasize 

Willard's Values 

Women's and Misses smart 
apparel exclusively 

Willard's 

139-153 Geary Street 











E. F. HUTTON & GO. 



MEMBERS 



New York Stock Exchange 

490 California St. and St. Francis Hotel 
Branch: Del Monte Hotel 

Private Wires 
Coast to Coast 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIALTY 

Basil ill ». m. (o 2 p, in. 

548 Sacramento St., cor. Leidasdorff 



Old Hampshire Bond 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

The Standard Paper for Business Slationcry. 
"Made a lilile Iwtter than seems necessary." The 
typewriter papers are sold in attractive and durable 
ix>xes containing five hundred perfect sheets, plain 
or marginal ruled. The manuscript covers are sold 
in similar boxes containing one hundred sheets. 
< )rdcf through your printer or stationer, or. if so de- 
sired we will send a sample book showing the antire 

BLAKE, MOFFIT & TOWNE 

l'.i.bliih«l 1855 
37-45 FIRST STREET SAN FRANC 



A woman's chict interest in her dan 
is to sec that they marry better men than 
their father. — Smart Set. 



750 Bu 

343 Bu 
Repair 

Largest 


U. S. GARAGE 
<h St. Phone Garfield 713 

PEARSON GARAGE 
.h St. Phone Douglas 2120 
Shop and Annex 350 Bush St. 


and Most Complete Garages in 
the West 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 7, I92U 



The Motorists 



AFOOT, YOU ALSO MAY HAVE 
OBSERVED 

A motor bike is smaller than 
A truck or touring car, 
But I have noticed that it can 
Splash mud darned near as far. 
— From "Western Canadian Motorist." 
8 ffl © 

The motor car dealers association of this 
city has received permission from the Mc- 
Cray birthday party committee, to hold a 
sociability run to McCray's, near Cloverdale, 
at the same time the big party is held. This 
will take place August 14 and 15. 

The dealers association executive commit- 
tee met yesterday and decided to approve the 
run, and this will mean that the entire auto- 
motive industry is backing the big party and 
there will be several hundred automobiles in 
line when the parade starts to the Cloverdale 
resort. 

Plans are rapidly being completed for the 
event and entertainment will be the rule 
every hour. There will be boxing events and 
singers there, as well as one of the best jazz 
bands that can be secured. The big event 
will be the venison barbecue that will be held 
in the grove Sunday morning. 

Harry Marquard and Rene Pouchon, well 
known cafe owners here, will have full 
charge of this part of the program and they 
know their business. Al Coney has arranged 
for the entertainment and there will be 
plenty. Everything will be donated, so that 
expenses will be held down and more money 
obtained for the Old Man. Every year 
friends of McCray give him a birthday, but 
this year will be the banner event of his life, 
and friends in all parts of Northern California 
have arranged to make it a red letter day in 
McCray's life. 

The plans are all ready and hundreds will 
oe on hand to surprise the "Grand Old Man 
of Sonoma County" on August 14. 
S 8 8 

Traffic Officers 

Men from all parts of the country are 
arriving here for the traffic officers conven- 
tion that opens August 22 in the Auditorium 
here. These traffic experts are coming from 
every part of the country, from Canada, and 
from automobile clubs and traffic organiza- 
tions. In addition the California Automobile 
Trades Association will hold its meeting here 
at the same time. 

Robert W. Martland, State secretary, is 
busy lining up his assistants and getting the 
men here for the biggest convention ever 
held in the West. Since all the members of 
the automobile trades association are vitally 



interested in traffic regulations and rules, it is 
certain that there will be a record crowd on 
hand when the big convention opens. 

C. DeWitt De Mar, manager of the 
National Traffic Officers Association and Lt. 
Dan Sylvester, president, are lining up their 
forces to greet the visiting delegates. Lt. 
Sylvester will lead a monster parade down 
Market street, the day the convention opens. 
In this parade will be police officers from all 
over the country, including the famous Fifth 
avenue delegation from New York. 

This famous police force will bring with 
it a complete model of the light signal sys- 
tem that is such a success on the busiest 
street on earth. This will make an interest- 
ing part of the exhibit that will be housed in 
the Auditorium. 

This safety exhibit will be the greatest of 
its kind ever held anywhere. There will be 
tests of all sorts staged by the National 
Traffic Officers Association and supervised 
by chosen experts from various cities of the 
country. These will include skidding tests and 
cars stopped with their brakes. Rules for 
these tests are now being formulated and the 
best known men in the country will be on 
hand to supervise the tests. Tire concerns 
have already entered the contest and there 
is much good natured rivalry among the tire 
men as to which tire will be awarded the 
prize. 

From present indications there will be a 
lot of interest in this feature because of the 
national prominence of the judges. 



The Russian river resorts are the lure for 
thousands these days and this applies par- 
ticularly to those who have motor cars. The 
roads are fairly good all the way there and 
the scenery wonderful. In fact there is no 
more beautiful country in the west than this 
part of the State. 

Herbert A. Seller, head of the H. A. Seller 
Company, made a vacation trip up there 
recently in a United States Tire equipped 
Paige car. He started up on Saturday and 
returned in time for business Monday 
morning. 

The route is well marked by hundreds of 
signs and the roads are fair. Take the 
Sausalito ferry to Sausalito and then out the 
highway to San Anselmo and then on to 
Olema and Point Reyes and along the shores 
of Tomales Bay to Tomales and through 
Valley Ford and Camp Meeker to Monte 
Rio. 

Here are a hundred and one places to 
stop. If you want to take camping parapher- 
nalia along, go as far as you like. There 



are plenty of places to camp and in Red- 
woods and along pleasant streams to boot. 

A fine trip in this part of the country is 
along the Russian River. Hire a boat at 
Monte Rio, pack the camp stuff in and go up 
the river. Live in your bathing suit if you 
want, and just step off into the river and 
swim. 

You can come back the same way you 
started or another way. It is best, of course, 
to vary the trip and come back another 
route. The best way is to come back down 
the same road you went over to a point a few 
miles below Camp Meeker, and then turn to 
the left and go over to Sebastopol and into 
Petaluma and through Nevato and to San 
Rafael, and then back to Sausalito and then 
home. 

This is a delightful week end trip, easy to 
make and well worth while. There is every- 
thing there that the vacationist likes. Streams 
and wooded areas, where camping is ideal, 
and there are few mosquitoes, in fact, they 
are hard to find at all. 

© © © 

Working twelve to fourteen hours a day, 
is no way to spend a vacation, at least that 
is what most of us would think, but J. W. 
Leavitt, Oldsmobile distributor, thinks dif- 
ferently. 

Jack Leavitt went back to the Olds plant 
at Lansing, Michigan, just to confer with 
the factory officials and have a look round. 
He was gone twelve days and in that lime 
he found out a lot of things. 

He was in conference with the factory 
engineers, the president of the company and 
other "higher ups" and they exchanged ideas 
and talked mechanics. Incidentally Leavitt 
was at the Olds laboratories every day at 6 
o'clock in the morning and never left until 
6 o'clock at night. 

They were testing cars and new ideas and 
Leavitt expresses the hope that a great deal 
of good will come from these efforts. 

When the first Olds eight was announced 



uality 

TIRE SHOP 

Expert Tire and 
Tube Repairers 

Quality Retreading 



MARSHALL SQUARE 
VULCANIZING GO. 

10 Marshall Square 

Hyde SI. nur Mnktl 
Phone Market 3837 



A 



August 7, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



two years ago, Leavitt immediately hopped 
a train and went to the factory. There he 
took a car and drove it across country to 
this city. He found a lot of things and sent 
his recommendations to the factory, and 
many of them were adopted. 

Then a year later he made two trips across 
the country, each time with an Olds eight. 
Again his recommendations were incorpor- 
ated in the new cars. Leavitt is one of those 
men who like to know all about the product 
he is selling and he knows, by actual service, 
what the car will do. 

He is now taking a vacation trip with his 
family in two Oldsmobiles. He will go to 
Yosemite and probably over Tioga Pass to 
Lake Tahoe. He will be gone a week or 

two. 

© © © 

There are a lot of things to learn about an 
automobile that are simple tricks that help 
you out of a tight place when you slip off the 
road, or are in trouble. The best of us 
admit that we sometimes do have trouble. It 
is good to know what to do when an 
emergency arises. 

Many times a quick burst of speed will 
prevent trouble, other times good brakes will 
stop you in time. And other times a knowl- 
edge of the "old timer's" tricks will save you 
much fuss. 

For instance if you get caught in a rain- 
storm and the road gets slippery and you 
slide sideways into a ditch and think you are 
going to have to stay there, get out and get 
some foliage- from the trees and make your 
own road for a while. It takes time and 
trouble, but it will save you having to be 
pulled out. 

Sometimes when you go out for a picnic 
you back off the road on a steep pilch which 
is grass covered. When you start to get out 
you may find that the rear wheels spin on the 
grass. The mistake most men make is to 
give the car all the gas it will take and get 
into low gear and try to pull out. The rear 
wheels just spin and dig a deeper hole. 

Try it this way some time: Stop, and sit 
back and take stock. Then get into low 
gear, and give the motor just enough gas so 
that it will not stop. Step on the throttle 
slowly and you will be surprised to find the 
rear wheels taking hold and you will pull 
out under your own power. 

When this will not work, get out and dig a 
shallow trench so that the front wheels will 
have something in which to rest. Then the 
car will not slide sideways and you will 
pull out. 

"These are just common sense things 
which most of us overlook." points out E. 
W. Milburn. the live wire manager of Greer- 
Robbins Company here, distributors of Hup- 
mobiles. 

"Many drivers lose their heads, spin the 
wheels of the car and dig in deeper. I have 
found that I can get out of any place that I 



can get into with a Hupmobile and I have 
tried it time and time again." 
© © © 

With glowing reports of crop conditions 
and prosperity in Southern and Central Cali- 
fornia, and optimistic reports on the condi- 
tion of the motor car industry, L. M. Field, 
distributor of Jackson cars and trucks in the 
West, has returned here. 

Field has made an extensive study of the 
conditions and finds that optimism is the key- 
note of all industry throughout the State, 
and this in spite of tighter money and more 
or less of a shortage of water for irrigation 
purposes. 

Fresno farmers were waiting for the great 
auction that was held this week in New York, 
to get some idea of the prices they would 
receive for their raisins. This sale netted 
22 to 24 cents a pound so that prices will 
soon be set by the association and then sev- 
eral million dollars will be released there. 

The demand for automobiles and trucks is 
enormous, and growing. Many farmers, par- 
ticularly, have put off buying their cars and 
trucks until their harvests were in. Soon 
they will receive large amounts and most of 
this will be placed in circulation immedi- 
ately. It will mean an enormous impetus to 
all business, especially in California. 

Field has arranged a financing .plan for 
many of his dealers and is evolving a new 
scheme so that more business can be done at 
once. That he has succeeded is shown by 
increasing sales of cars and trucks. 
9 9 9 

A very significant incident happened the 



other day to a motorist. His automobile was 
ran into by another automobile, jamming 
the bumper and headlight. The driver of 
the offending machine said his insurance 
agent would attend to the damage. When 
the number of the automobile was looked up 
in the automobile registry, it was found that 
the number (19,358) belonged to a Dodge 
machine, whereas the miscreant machine was 
a Roamer. All sorts of misdeeds in the 
automobile world could be dodged (this 
isn't meant as a pun) in this manner by the 
fortunate owner of two or more different 
makes of automobiles. 



AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE 
EXCLUSIVELY 

Union Indemnity Exchange 

of California 

Better Rates Quicker Service 



American National Bank Building 

Telephone Sutter 2645- Sutter 2646 



AUTOMOBILE STARTING AND 
LIGHTING SYSTEMS 

Give satisfactory results when given proper at- 
tention. We specialize on Electrical equipment, 
storage batteries, etc., and guarantee satisfaction. 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

Brand & Cusfiman 
955 Post St. Phone Prospect 741 



SUNSHINE SERVICE CO. 

HIGHWAY AND 12TH AVE., SAN MATEO. 

Auto repairing, painting, top and curtain work, and upholstering. A full and com- 
plete line of automobile accessories at city prices. All our work guaranteed. Day and 
night service. All work done by competent mechanics. Give us a trial and be convinced. 
Distributors and service for Exide batteries. Phone San Mateo 33. 




18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 7, 1920 



Sunbeams 



First Constable — "Did yer git that feller's 
number?" 

Second Constable — "No, he was too gol- 
derned fast fer me. Thet was a perty pert- 
lookin' gal in the back seat, wasn't it." 

First Constable — "She shure was!" — Hum 
Bug. 



A lawyer and a minister were having a 
heated argument about the hereafter. With 
eloquence the preacher expanded the theory 
of life after death. The lawyer listened, 
bored and plainly unconvinced. The parson 
finished. The lawyer was unmoved. 

"Say what you will, I believe death ends 
all," he insisted. 

The minister's sense of humor came to his 
rescue. "If death ended all," he observed, 
"most of you lawyers would be starving to 
death." — New York Evening Post. 



"Oh, Clarise, I'm so worried! You know 
you told me to put that piece of wedding 
cake under my pillow and I'd dream of my 
future husband?" 

"Yes, dear; didn't it work?" 

"That's what worries me. I dreamed ol 
the Seventy-first regiment." — American 
Legion Weekly. 



"What is meant by 'an embarrassment of 
riches'?" inquired the man who always wants 
to know something. 

"I couldn't say offhand," replied the dele- 
gate. "Ask some candidate whose campaign 
fund has been oversubscribed. — Washington 
Star. 



Willie— "Pa." 

Pa— "Yes." 

Willie — "Teacher says we're here to help 
others." 

Pa — "Of course, we are." 

Willie — "Well, what are the others here 
for?" — The New Majority. 



Bobbie — "My father must have been up 
to all sorts of mischief when he was a boy." 

Johnny — "Why ?" 

Bobbie — " 'Cos he knows 'xactly what 
questions to ask me when he wants to know 
what I've been doing." — Cleveland News. 



Popularity is the art of keeping awake 
when one wants to sleep, of talking when 
one wants to eat, and of listening politely 
when one longs to yell. — Smart Set. 



The oldest inhabitant can not recall when 
he had to dig down so deep for potatoes. — 
Detroit News. 



In Russia the brotherhood of man seems 
to be working out in about the same way it 
does in every family where there are four 
boys who all want the flivver Sunday night. 
— Philadelphia Inquirer. 



If you see your husband kissing a pretty 
girl, back him into a corner and ask him if 
he still loves you. If he says yes, it is a sign 
that you have married a first-rate liar. — 
Smart Set. ■ 



Fig Packing Demonstration 

Mrs. Fred Hansen has installed a miniature packing plant in our st-rt, where she is demonstrating to 
the public the modern methods and sanitary conditions under which 

SIERRA BRAND FIGS AND RAISINS Are Packed 

This special event should not be overlooked by anyone. 

Special prices on all of Mrs. Hansen's packs during this demonstration. 

Now at GOLDBERG, BOWEN & COMPANY, Grocers, 242 Sutter St. 



CL1IN 1 (JIN LtArLlrjYlA Opposite Orpheum Theater 

Continuous Serving from 7 A. M. lo 8 P. M. — Music, Lunch and Dinner Orchestral an i Vocal 



Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 



CAPITAL $3,000,000 
FIRE 



AUTOMOBILE 



ASSETS $22,500,000 
MARINE 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Co. in America" 

FIRE AUTOMOBILE WINDSTORM 



TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



REASONABLE RATES 







Don't Experiment With Your Eyes 

CONSULT 

DR. GEORGE MAYERLE 

Exclusive Eyesight Specialist 
And Expert Optometrist 

Scientific Eye Examinations 








'■%i 1 


OVER 25 YEARS 
IN SAN FRANCISCO 




MAYERLE'S Eyewater 
A Marvelous Eye Ionic 
For Children or Adults 






At Druggists 50 Cents 
By Mail 65 Cents 






San Francisco, California. 
960 Market St. 



Graney's Billiard Parlor 



Finest in the World 
Perfect Ventilation 
924 Market Street 
61 Eddy Street 



EDDIE GRANEY, Proprietor 



We Casa del Rey 

is a million dollar lire-proof hotel, on 
the sunny bathing beach at Santa 
Cruz. It offers the advantages of 
tennis, golf, motoring, fishing and 
swimming, and is the center of Santa 
Cruz social life. 

MORRIS & WARNER. Props. 



IHIoftd §a„ Msifttew 



a. 

217 Second Avenue, San Mateo 
SPECIAL SUNDAY DINNER $1.00 
MEALS A LA CARTE 

Special attention paid to banquets, automobile 
parties and tourists. The only first-class a la 
carte restaurant in San Mateo. The hotel is 
entirely new; hot and cold water in every room. 
All well lighted. Rooms with private bath. 
Prices moderate. Summer rates given. Elevator 
service. 



EPPLER'S 

BAKERY and LUNCH 

886 Geary Street 



Branch Confectionery 

SLTTER and POWELL STREETS 
Phone Douglas 1912 



The Cecil Hotel 

of San Francisco offers 
the perfect combination 
of home and hotel life. 
Cuisine excellent. Lux- 
ury of billiard, card and 
reading rooms. 

Mrs. O. I 7 .. MORRIS. Proprietor. 



J. B. Pou J. Berocz C. Lalannc 

L. Coutard C. Mailhebuau 

BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old POODLE-DOG Co. 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

Music and Entertainment Every Evening 

415-421 Bmh St.. San Francisco 

(Above Kearny) I xchwige. Doug. Z4II 



THE SONG OF A LASS 

By Ruth Sawyer 
Tis Spring o' the Year — the whole world's 

a-bloom ; 
There's a carpet of green from Granny 

Earth's loom. 
The curley calls far — the rooks circle high — 
And the wisp of a moon hangs low in the 

sky. 
Oh, the fair things I see and the rare songs 

I hear! 
For Love wakes my heart at the Spring c' 

the Year. 
'Tis the Full o' the Year — the roses are 

blown ; 
The lambs are full fleeced and the fledglings 

are flown, 
the throstle's note lingers, the summer winds 

croon, 
And kisses hang ripe at the full of the moon. 
Oh, there's little I'm wanting — there'E little 

1 fear 
For my heart is as full as the full of the 

year. 
'Tis the Dole o' the Year — there's naught left 

of her giving; 
Earth is bare of her yield. Life is drained 

of her living. 
The turf smoke blows east, and the turf 

smoke blows west 
But the breath of my longing knows little 

of rest. 
A moment I catch it — the better to hear 
The song that was mine at the Spring o 

the Year. 

— Good Housekeeping. 



Wedding Presents: The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell streets. 



METROPOLIS 

By Louise Gebhard Cann. 
Torn petal in the torrent of the street. 
She passes — wan. a something strange and 

frayed. 
Mo\cd by the human flood, whose turgid 

grade 
Tosses her. froth, where chance and changes 

beat. 
She pauses not : and in her look the heat 
Of answer to her kindred lies dismayed. 
Not in their millions finds she any aid 
To guard and help her. fearful in defeat. 
What mi the wind that whirled her from 

her stem 
To flutter rootless in this churning tide? 
To wli.it dark karma does this flood condemn 
Her broken bloom > Or will she. gathering 

pride. 
Rise to new budding; fling down roots 

through them — 
These waves that buffet — and their strength 

deride ? 

— Ainslee's. 



Trained observers report that afler-dinm 
oratory is languishing now that all banquc' 
are dry. There's some valuable propa 
for the prohibitionists. — Nashville Southern 
Lumberman. 



Want a Better Position? 

Bell Syllabic Shorthand in Six Weeks. 

Bell Touch Typewriting in Six Weeks. 

Our Complete Stenographic or "Dictaphone" 
Course in about Two Months. 

If you wish to prepare In ONE-FOURTH 
the time and at ONE-FOURTH the cost, EN- 
ROLL NOW. 

One of our courses makes an ideal Holiday 
for the wife, son or daughter, and PROTECTS 
THEIR future for all time. Individual instruc- 
tion. Day and Evening. 

Investigation costs you nothing, and may save 
regret. 

THE SYLLABIC INSTITUTE 
"The 6 Weeks' Business School." 

376 Sutter Street. (Douglas 4316) 
SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

INSURANCE BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 



ALADDIN 
STUDIO 
TIFFIN 
ROOM 

220 POST V FOURTH FLOOR 

SAN FRANCISCO 

m 

SPECIALIZING FIFTY CENT 
LUNCH 



HATTIE MOOSER 
M. C. MOOSER 




N w COONER 

POLK »nd POST STS. 



BERT BECKERLEG 



PHONE PROSPECT 2641 



JOHN A. DAV1TT 



Auto Electricians 
Special Batteries Built 



Ignition — Starting — Generating 
24 Volt System a Specialty 



PHimmypiiyi 
ERy 

With the PHILCO Slotted Retainer ^ 

Lj — 1— I 











At Cleveland, the stupendous ore-handling 
machinery along the Lake is a notable example 
of "Diamond Construction for Strength." 



Who Guarantees the Battery on Your Car? 
The Manufacturer or You? 

YOU didn't build the battery. Why should you guarantee it? If you buy a 
battery that is not guaranteed, you are saddling yourself with the manufacturer's 
burden. That is not businesslike — nor necessary. 

Of course, some manufacturers do not absolutely refuse a guarantee. They may 
guarantee for ninety days or six months or a year. But that merely postpones 
your risk. Why should you be satisfied with no guarantee or a short guarantee when 
you can buy a Philadelphia Diamond Grid Battery with the Philco Slotted Retainer 

Guaranteed for Two Years 

"How is it," you may ask, "that only one manufacturer of national importance dares give such a 
guarantee — a guarantee so much longer and stronger than any other? 

The answer lies in two patented features of the Philadelphia Battery 
gBSFMft JSJKf A shown in the illustration above — the Diamond Grid and the Philco 
" - Retainer. These alone make the guarantee possible. 

An. interesting booklet explaining these features 
in detail and telling you the best way to take 
care of your battery is yours for the asking. 




DIAMOND GRID BATTERY CO. 



ufHla 



JkiL 



*«**»» a tvj 



1441 BUSH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



r\ i— i-\ ■ 



OAKLAND 
CALIF 



K^K](§Q§(§ ( 




(&ul%f#m%K %mtti^Mt. 







■MHMmi^ems 



<r 



SATURDAY, AUGUST 14, 1920 




" — I L 




The Ford Coupe makes an ideal car for shopping purposes, giving protection 
from wind and inclement weather, yet offering the advantages of an open car. 





&>. 



Authorized Saics and Service - Since 1903 
GEARY AT VAN NESS, SAN FRANCISCO 

LOS ANGELES OAKLAND PORTLAND SAN DIEGO 



^ 



J 



Telephone Sutler 6654 



Importers 



GEO. W. GASWELL GO, 

COFFEE AND TEA 

Spices, Baking Powder, Flavoring 

Extracts 

442-452 Second Street, San Francisco 



For that stubborn cough 
Use Old Snake Doctor's Cough Remedy 

SNAKE DRUG CO. 

Formerly G. Leipnitz & Co. 

Now Located at 

127-129 KEARNY ST. 



MacRORiE - McLaren co. 

FLORISTS. NURSERYMEN 

and 
LANDSCAPE ENGINEERS 

141 Powell Street, San Francisco 

Nurseries: San Maleo 

Phone San Maleo 1002 

Phone Douglas 4946 and Palace Hotel 



A. W. BEST ALICE BEST 

BEST'S 

ART SCHOOL 

1625 California Street 

Life Classes — Day and Night 

Illustrating Sketching Painting 



TIRES VULCANIZING 

THOMAS H. ELKINGTON 

Distributor for 

Kelly-Springfield Tires 

Long Mileage Tires and Second Hand Tires 

865 POST ST.. Near Hyde 

Phone PROSPECT 1566 




FIREPROOF 

STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1636 Market St. 

Bet. Franklin and Gough 
Tel. Park 271 San Francisco 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



Bank of New South Wales 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of Pro- 
prietors 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



$20,000,000.00 
16.000,000.00 



Aggregate Assets, 30th 
Sept. 1919 




$56.000.000.00 
$335,181,247.00 



SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E. ( General Manager 

340 BRANCHES and AGENCIES In the Australian Slates, New Zealand. Fiji, Papua (New 

Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australian Banking 

Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Aranged. 

Head Office: London Office: 

GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET. E. C. 2 

Agents: 
Bank of California, National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bank. Crocker Nat'l Bank 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Rese.ve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 

STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and at LONDON. ENG.; NEW YORK: 

PORTLAND. ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE. 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Manager W. J. COULTHARD. Assistant Manager 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 California St., San Francico, Cal. 
Member of the Federal Reserve System 
Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement and 7lh Avenue 

HAICHT STREET BRANCH Haighl and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30. 1920 

Assets $66,840,376.95 Capital Actually Paid Up $ 1.000.000.00 

Deposits ., 63.352.269.17 Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,488,107.78 

Employees' Pension Fund $330,951.36 

OFFICERS 

IOHN A. BUCK. President 

GEO. TOURNY. Vicc-Pres. and Manace. A. H. R. SCHMIDT. Yice-Pres. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSI.. Vice-President A. H. MULLER. Secretary 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN. Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL. Assistant Cashier 

G. A. BELC1 II R. Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN. Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYER. Manager Mission Branch W. C. HF.YER, Manager Park-Presidio Dist. Branch 

O. F. PAULSEN. Manager Haight Street Branch 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JOHN A. BUCK E. T. KRUSE I. N. WALTER A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY A. H. R. SCHMIDT HUGH GOODFELLOW E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. A. CHRISTENSON ROBERT DOLLAR L. S. SHERMAN 

GOODFELLOW. EELLS. MOORE & ORRICK. General Attorneys 



THE ANGLO & LONDON PARIS NATIONAL BANK 

BOND DEPARTMENT 
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The Term of the loan will suit every requirement. One may invest for any length of time 

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The Amount may be $100. which will return $6.00 a year; $500, which will return $40.00 
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Complete information on request. Phone, write or call. 

Sutter and Sansome Streets Phone Kearny 5600 

San Francisco. California 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856. 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. xcvm. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., SATURDAY, AUGUST 14, 1920 



No. 6 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA AD- 
VERTISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. Fred- 
erick Marriott, 259 Minna Street, near Fourth. San Francisco, Cal. Telephone 
Kearny 720. Entered at San Francisco, Cal.. Post-Office as second-class mail 
matter. 

London Office -George Street & Company, 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) — 1 year. $2.50. Foreign: 1 year $5. 
Canada: I year, $3.50. 



Oakland has taken the wind out of our planes in being the 

first to receive the air mail flyers. 



The strike situation in Denver is quieting down, after the 

usual killing of innocenl bystanders, including women and children. 



And now comes a new "drive,' 

Heavens! Isn't the war over yet? 



for drafl deserters! Good 



If all surrendering officers and men could be as well paid for 

the act as Villa and his trusty followers, there would soon be peace 
in Europe. 



Promises from presidential aspirants are growing as thick as 

flies around a honey pot. And they will be about as long-lived is 
flies. 

Well, here it is six years since the great war began, and we 

are still struggling to pronounce the unpronounceable names of the 
Russian and Polish cities that are in the thick of the fight. 



There is nothing so pathetic ai B man hying to ml. 

frivolous Enancee in politics and other abstract quest -; unless 

perhaps it is a wife trying lo interest lici husband in household 



Mars is trying to coquet with Mother Earth, so the great 

astronomer, Camille Flamarion, asserts. Hasn't she had enough of 
Ins attentions during the last six years? 



We have heard much, pro and con. regarding the sincerity 

and ability of Mrs. Elsie Lincoln Benedict, lecturer on psychology, 
but one of her statements with which we heartily agree, is that 
"America's greatest ill is worry." 



"Governor Cox and Roosevelt marched .<' lh( head ol the 

parade down the main street of the nominee's home town." when 
m incr accented the Democratic presidential nomination, 

km I of "Cox-cy's Army!" 



Municipal ownership of street railways in San Francises has 

not met with the success thai was at first predicted. Possibly under 
a different administration it might have been made profitable 
events, the only thing to be done now. is to buns; the San Francisco 
railways up to something like modern methods by fhe city purchas- 
ing the United Railways and so have all the car lines under the 
same management, and with one transfer service. There are many- 
ways in which San Francisco is woefully behind the times, and surely 
the inconvenience ol operating several cat lines i- one ol them! 



_ Why not let Russia work out her own salvation in her own 

way, as other countries have had to do? Our own great Nation had 
lo have its Civil war before it settled down into a united country. 



And now the little Japs are accusing us of being "puffed up" 

since the war. They should remember their own leanings in that 
direction after the Russian war. and not "throw stones in a glass 
house." 



Even in their celebrations of joy. the Irish have to murder 

some one, as witness the killing of one civilian and the wounding of 
another, in the demonstration held in Dublin, upon Archbishop 
Maniiix' arrival from America. 



And now from the usually peaceful and dreamy Samoan 

Isles, come charges and counter-charges of maladministration in their 
government; Is there no spot on the globe, remote and isolated as 
it may be, where the grim forms of discontent and turmoil do not 

stalk?" 



I he Von Brinckens are again in the limelight, and Mrs, Von 

Brincken, in hei endeavor to prove that her first marriage was illegal 

(in order to be wedded in '!)• Catholic church to Lieutenant 

Swcnson), appears to have no thought of her two children, who. if 

successful, will be surely stamped as illegitu 



Hi, "depot 'he principals in the trial ol Jan 

Addicotl, of the Polytechnic High School, who is charged with 
illegally suspending seventy-one pupils for poor scholarship, would 
not be a very good example for their pupils to emulate. In fact, the 
children themselves could hardly act in a more undignified and 
childish manner. 

Golden Gate Paik should have moi ong its 

winding trails. You wander up some path, with one sign to guide 

-sing it. find many roads that cross and re-cross, 

with no enlightening literature by the way. A good adventure it is. 

to get lost for sauntering lovers, perhaps, but alas' we are not all 



Any pri.ate vessel, sailing from an American port into the 

waters of revolutionary ' ■ ••uld be Investigated without delay, 

whether owned by an "attractive widow" or not. Personal 
'hink that the more attractive she is. the quicker should be the 
examination. The mysterious "On Time Again" anchored 
yacht harbor off the Marina, should be "overhauled" in time to 
ncrt. perhaps, some traitoious d' 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 14, 1920 



Editorial 



There are always two sides to every existing 
Unrestricted Power condition in life. And in the great industrial 
Becomes Tyranny discussion that is. and has been disturbing the 
world periodically, there are, of course, the 
two factions, the two sides. — Capital and Labor. Neither side can 
be wholly right, nor wholly wrong, being made up of mere, faulty 
human beings. Each side has its faults and its virtues, its uses and 
abuses, and each feels toward the other a fundamental and very 
bitter antagonism, which is, apparently, irradicable. 

Any movement, any body of men, who. step by step, strongly 
opposed, fight and win, becomes insatiable, greedy. — does not know 
when to stop; does not know how to limit its desires. That is human 
nature. To grasp at something, and when that something is gained, 
to reach out for more and more. This is a characteristic of Capital; 
why not of Labor? And in these befuddled, topsy-turvy, after-the- 
war days, dividing lines have become effaced to a great extent, and 
there are possibilities of the laborer becoming a capitalist, and 
vice versa. 

The possession of power intoxicates, and when power is possessed 
by a class not used to it. a class that has for centuries been exploited 
and suppressed, then the feeling is exaggerated, until it grows into a 
danger, not only to its owners, but to the world in general. 

Unionism, in its inception, was an admirable thing. Its motto: 
"The greatest good to the greatest number." was a just, worthy 
cause. There was a spirit of unselfishness, of nobility about an 
organization which put all workers on a level for the common good; 
that did not, or would not, recognize the fact that one man was 
brighter than another, could work more quickly, was of more value 
to his employer. The strong would take no more than the weak, 
because the weak had to be helped! And the only way to help along 
the slower brother, was to unite in a common cause, which meant 
self-sacrifice. 

What a difference now! The highly paid official of some of the 
more "aristocratic" of the unions, are paid for a dictatorship that is 
often absolutely antagonistic to the men themselves! Quite often, 
the union official gradually loses all sympathy with his own brother- 
hood, and feels himself above the ordinary worker; sometimes does 
all in his power to "keep down" his own brother laborer (should- he 
aspire to other success than that in his own trade), out of personal 
jealousy. (We state this from our own experience). There is no 
being so autocratic, no snob so snobbish, no man so selfish, as the 
man who has risen from the rank and file, into some so-called high 
position, and who has lost all sympathy with the rank and file. 

There are, in all unions, great abuses being practiced, and the 
ordinary worker pays for these. There are the members known as 
"floaters," men who do not work themselves, but who dictate to the 
laborers, and who gain their livelihood from the work of others. 
These men go from city to city, from community to community, 
agitating trouble; quite often, as we all know, causing strikes which 
the men themselves are not in sympathy with, and do not desire. 
And then come weeks and months of enforced idleness; of men 
thrown out of work. — who are commanded not to work, and whose 
families suffer. Then the "floater" moves on. to make trouble in 
some other town or city, for this is the way he makes his living. In 
the case of the ordinary union man. at present he is simply trying 
to serve many masters, instead of one! 

In striving to discover the right or wrong in this great question, the 
reason why labor should indulge periodically in murderous riots such 
as have been going on in Denver, we have come to the conclusion 
that there is something lacking, something radically wrong, in a gov- 
ernment whose working classes find it necessary to band together in 



cliques or groups; to make laws limiting the amount of production; 
to have to strike for shorter hours and higher pay to meet advancing 
prices of all commodities; to have the authority to call out their 
members from factory or shop, even when a country is in the dire 
stress or war; to have the privilege of saying that this firm may sell 
its goods, but that one cannot; in fact, to become a highly autocratic 
and aggressive federated organization that can absolutely dictate 
in all industrial affairs! 

A government that is the right sort of government, — the govern- 
ment that will endure, is the government that has the welfare of all 
its people at heart. And the most important laws that it creates, 
are the laws governing labor. No one class should rule in a 
democracy; no one class should be allowed to dictate to another; 
for just so surely as this is allowed, then one class is going to 
tyrannize over the other! Unrestricted power is demoralizing, 
whether it is possessed by Capital or Labor, and just at present, it 
would seem that Labor is the tyrant. 

We believe that unionism and unions have served their purpose; 
that the good which has been accomplished by unionism is fast being 
overthrown by its present abuse of power; that the government 
should step in and place restrictions upon that power, not by calling 
out the militia, and so only adding fuel to the fiery spirit of the mob, 
but by wise and broadminded mandates. Much constructive legis- 
lation for the good of the common people was accomplished by the 
Democratic administration before the war. Lincoln said: "God must 
have loved the 'mob;' he made so many of us!" And some of the 
wonderful bills which were put through during Wilson's first four 
years, were for the mob, — the masses. Here are some of them — 

An effective seamon's act was adopted. 

Child labor legislation was enacted. 

The parcel post and rural free delivery was developed. 

A good roads bill and a rural credits act were passed. 

Eight-hour laws were adopted. 

The Clayton amendment to the Sherman anti-trust act was passed, 
freeing American labor, and taking it from the category of commodi- 
ties: and Federal Employment Bureaus were created. 

England has had for several years, a labor representative In her 
Parliament. Why should we not follow her example? There should 
be more intelligent labor legislation in the government of the United 
States, and the next Federal law taken up and discussed for adoption 
by a mixed committee of capitalists and laborites, should be the 
minimum wage scale for both men and women. 



Joseph Scott of Los Angeles. Republican 
Los Angeles Man leader, has announced himself for Samuel 

Advocates Shortridgc M. Shortridge for Republican candidate to 
the United States Senate. This is so very 
unusual, when Southern California has its own aspirant in A. J. 
Wallace, that we cannot help making a note of it. Mr. Scott says: 

"While we of Southern California would like to see a Southern 
California man in the United States senate, we want still more than 
that to see a Republican in the Senate, and we realize that Wallace 
would be easy for Phelan to beat. 

"Shortridge is the only man who can beat Phelan and as soon as 
that is generally known, the south will gel behind Shortridge and put 
him over. Wallace wouldn't have a chance to beat Phelan. 

"Kent apparently hasn't a chance to get the nomination, so we 
can leave him out of it and that makes Shortridge the only logical 
candidate for California Republicans of both the north and the 
couth to get behind." 

Now, what do you think of that? It is a unique situation, isn't 
it? Los Angeles has a perfectly good politician in the person of 
A. J. Wallace; a man who has resided in this State for thirty years, 
three of which he served in the city council of Los Angeles, during 
which he was chaiiman of the Finance Committee, and rendered this 



August 14, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



service satisfactorily. He was for several months acting governor 
in the absence of Hiram Johnson. He is described as a man of 
"Sterling character, and unblemished reputation; a courageous 
leader, a forceful speaker, a practical idealist, a sound business man, 
a man of the common people, with a keen social conscience, and a 
broadminded, far-seeing statesman." In fact, he is everything that 
a candidate should be, and isn't (and never will be, in our opinion! ), 
and still, in spite of all these virtues, this paragon is not the choice 
of Southern California's Republican leader, and our Samuel 
Shortridge is! It passeth understanding! 

Taking into consideration the usual attitude of the Los Angelean; 
his acceptance of anything and everything Southern Californian, no 
matter what stupendous faults may be found therein, we marvel at 
the stand that Mr. Scott has taken, in turning coldly from the embodi- 
ment of all the best qualities in man, to give the glad hand to a 
Northern Californian ! 

In our bewilderment, all we can conclude is, that our Sam is a 



like a littl 



e pinch 



superman 



How Is Your Heart? 



Every decade has its favored disease, its 
much-discussed organ, in Materia Medica. 
That troublesome little organ, the appendix. 



that after all was said and done, there was nothing 
of soda in some water for that! 

And then these patients, secure in the belief that there was nothing 
really serious the matter with them, have over-exerted their strength 
and— passed on. And the autopsy (slitting a body open appears 
to be the only way to really find out anything definite) has shown 
that the deceased was a chronic sufferer from heart disease' What 
a discovery for those who are left behind! What agony of soul for 
these, who realize too late, what they might have done to make life 
easier for the beloved! What tortures in the thought of the terrible 
suffering endured diagnosed and treated for "gas on the stomach'" 

Well! In much of our suffering we have onjy ourselves to blame 
We haven t the time, or we are indifferent, or we are just naturally 
too lazy, to apply ourselves to finding out the causes for the condi- 
tions under which we are agonizing. Or we put altogether too 
much ignorant confidence in some "family doctor." who is, after all 
merely human, and not a super-man, and who no doubt, is often 
horribly puzzled by our mixed and contradictory descriptions of our 
symptoms, or what we believe are our symptoms! 

We must read authentic books on this subject (many good ones 
are being published at present); study ourselves; observe others- 
be as temperate as .possible in all things; keep our minds occupied, 
s way have less time to brood upon our griefs. 



rid 



was for many years — apparently, — the most important thing in our generally strive to live wisely, 

internal economy. You were not of the elite if you still possessed e crv,n S need of we poor, long-suffering humans, is a better 

an appendix, — you must have it removed at least once, — or you were knowledge of our own bodies. — a fairly intelligent idea of our organs 

numbered with the old fogies and "has beens." anc ' ,neir functions and needs, — especially of that wonderful little 

Every pain and ache in the body could be traced to this little sac. en 8»'e. the heart, upon whose faintest movement the greatest issues 

that hangs from the right side of the intestines, and has recently been hang, whose action and reaction governs the whole mechanism of 

proved to be a sort of natural lubricator of the bowels. Everything "to.— the whole tenor of our Fate! So that the beating hearts that 

we ate had its effect on it; we avoided the tiniest grape seed as we are ' e ' 1 behind will not torture themsebcs with futile regrets for the 



would poison, although we could remember with guilty consciences, 
and with great fear of the harm they might have done, the numerous 
cherry stones, grape-seeds, pieces of slate pencils, buttons, etc., that 
in our grossly ignorant childhood days, we had swallowed with 
immunity. 

Now, the kidneys, arteriosclerosis, and the heart hold the stage for 
the time being. The appendix is apparently forgotten. It is a thing 
of the past, like bustles or hoop skirts. And being forgotten, falling 
into a Rip van Winkle sleep, so to speak (from which we hope it may 



heart that is still! 



In a day when journalism is fast ceasing to be 

The Passing of literature; in fact when it has become demoral- 

Theodore Bonnet ized until much of it is unpunclualed and 

ungrammatical trash, the passing of an old-school 

literary light, in Theodore Bonnet, is greatly to be deplored. 

Mr. Bonnet, to judge from the many tributes paid him I 
press, was much too big for the positic 



ion he filled on a local 
never awaken), it is not giving us any more trouble! When we have temporary. Was he too modest to strive for something greater in 
a "tummy" ache, we lake the good old-fashioned remedies. — like " ,c hterary world, or had he tried, and perhaps discouraged by futile 
peppermint or castor oil. and apply a comfortable hot water bag. attempts, retreated into the small, restricted, distorted and unthankful 



and find ourselves alive and kicking the next morning. 

Hardening of the arteries, with its attendant ills. — heart and 
kidney troubles, appears to be the most discussed condition of the 
human body by physicians today. You can hardly pick up a maga- 
zine without coming across a lengthy and explanatory article on 
arteriosclerosis (what a word! One has to be a German to be 
able to pronounce it ! ) Then we begin to realize what a wonderful 
engine the heart is; how certain emotions, modes of living have their 
effect upon it; how worry has sometimes weakened the otherwise 
healthy heart; how hardening of the arteries brings up the blood 
pressure, and this in turn, causes more work for the heart; how 
sulphuric foods, like fish, meat and eggs, are bad for this condition. 
And so forth. 

After concentrating for an hour or so. on heart disease, and its 
causes, and the right diet and exercise for it. and how to discover 
its symptoms, etc.. \\c find that it is often mistaken for indigestion' 
That the stomach and the heart are so close together, their symptoms 
so nearly allied, that even those great masters of life and death. — 
the doctors, are often mistaken in their diagnoses' 

We have known cases of persons who were victims of heart disease 
(angina pectoris), comparatively all their li\cs. and have been told 
by numerous physicians (all of them considered the "best in town"), 
that they were sufferers from indigestion, or gas on the stomach, and 



confines of editorial writer on a weekly paper > 

^hat might he not have accomplished in another age and in 
another community) For the truth is being borne in upon us that 
California, although productive of genius in many lines, is not 
appreciative of that genius. Not a :!,r >.,„ Francisco public 
important enough or cultured enough, to make world-famous 
celebrities of the sons and daughters it has borne, without the 
'ance of other and more extensive fields of art. 

That is the sadness of such careers as Theodore Bonnet 
other persons of his gifts and scope. — that only after death (and 
sometimes not even then), do they receive anything like their due, 
•nd that this delayed praise comes from only a limited public. 

Gradually our literateurs are passing. — our western men and 
women of note. — and we query futilely if another generation will 
evolve from this conglomeration of futurist painting, "jazz" music, 
"\ers fibre." and slangy reportonal writing, into anything at all 
resembling the men and women who are no more. 

Somewhere, we hope, there is a particularly pleasant little Heaven 
for California's unvalued children of genius, where they can meet 
Mlhy and find a delayed happiness and appreciation in each 
other's presence. 



neral Wrange! is still true to his name. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 14, 1920 



Town Crier 

Hear the Crier: Who the Devil Art Thou? 

One Thai Will Play the Devil. Sir. With You. 



The records of fortunes won in the field of the light and power 

companies show that great profits have resulted from the franchises 
given by the people to these corporations. The use of the streets 
free, the ugly and ungainly poles marring the landscape, all beauty 
sacrificed to utility, and with all these privileges no care taken that 
the octopus' arms, more to be feared than those of Hugo's monster, 
may not endanger the lives of the citizens who extend all favors to 
these corporations! In the consideration of the dangers to life and 
property from electric wires there seems to be no line to draw 
between the power and intensities of the electric current on the 
various wires. The trolley current will kill, and in the smaller cities 
the wires are crossed and recrossed by telegraph and telephone wires 
innumerable. It is not that there are so many accidents, but that 
there are not more, that is the wonder. Stringent laws should be 
made, State laws preferable, to compel the protection of every wire 
carrying the dangerous current, by placing one or more guard wires 
near it. Let the bursting pockets of these companies, which fatten 
upon the public, give the public some slight assurance of safety, or 
let them go cut of business and give place to those who will find 
means of making a profit for themselves, and at the same time 
avoid the trade of common and unwarranted executioners. 



Mr. Cox's letter reminds me that letter wiiting is an art. A 

good business letter is an artistic effort and never fails to make a 
favorable impression on the recipient. A mm with a vicious pen is 
a man to be shunned. His sarcasm spreads discomfort in his political 
business and social life. Self-satisfied men who are born with a 
belief that they can take unwarranted liberties with their fellow men 
at long range, need the curb of sharp lessons, and nearly always get 
them. Time, patience, opportunity and enough paper are all they 
require. A bad letter is enduring. It stands as a monument of 
disgrace. Spoken words are susceptible to many interpretations; 
they soften with time and are forgotten. The sarcastic letter never 
dies and is never forgotten, for is it not always there to be read and 
reread? It rankles, and it radiates its enmity. It is possible for a 
•nan to struggle through life without the aid of enemies, but not of 
friends. Friends being a necessity, he should try to keep the old 
and acquire the new. An old Italian proverb says: "Have you fifty 
friends? It is not enough. Have you one enemy? It is too 
much." 



The attempts of some writers to enlarge upon the magnitude 

of the series of small temblors that have disturbed the peace of mind 
of Los Angeles visitors during the past month or six week have been 
instigated by a motive both mean and malicious. This is strong 
language, made up only after mature thought and careful delib- 
eration. Do not try, caustic writer, to draw conclusions regarding 
conditions that do not exist, for it is just as impossible to prove Los 
Angeles to be an unsafe dwelling place as it is to bring terror to the 
hearts of those who live in those delightful sections where a cyclone 
proof cellar is a family necessity. A writer who permits bad blood 
and malice to shape a criticism, is as lost to shame, repentance and 
reform as he is to decency. The attacks cannot injure that city and 
there is small probability that the city council will care to engage the 
News Letter for a championship so little needed. There is, however, 
a personal satisfaction in expressing opprobrium for such methods as 
we have referred to, although, in the present instance, gratification 
of this impulse carries with it at the same time a sensation of genuine 
regret. 



A correspondent makes complaint through the medium of one 

of the dailies that while "the rich man may have his cellar stocked 
with the choicest liquors which he is at liberty to take to any 
hostelry and openly imbibe, the poor devil with a flask of inferior 
Jersey lightning in his hip pocket is haled into court and punished," 
and inquires, "Is it right to make this invidious distinction?" The 
idea of legislating for the benefit of classes at the expense of the 
individual is a mistake. Even the great crime of being successful, 
provident and rich does not justify the enactment of laws against 
private persons. Let the law guard the individual rights and it will 
at the same time protect the rights of classes. The sum of the 
community is composed of units. If no individual right is assailed 
no community privilege is imperiled. Under our form of govern- 
ment the provident should have the same right to be protected and 
to protect themselves as the improvident, and vice versa. How may 
all this be brought about, you inquire? Well, a vote for Sam 
Shortridge might help, some. 



Laborers do not strike in hard times. The man who is 

without a job can't strike. The man whose situation is precarious 
because of uncertainty as to how long the work will last, is afraid 
to strike. Good times come. There is work for everybody, and 
more than all can do. Workmen demand better pay and generally 
get it. If they don't get it they strike and it comes promptly. Higher 
pay for the producer raises the cost of the product. The workman 
must pay more for all he buys. Everybody must do so, for every- 
body must get more for what he has to sell. Workmen must again 
get more for their labor. New strikes follow, wages advance, prices 
of products advance. Things cost so much that people buy less. 
Building diminishes because prices of material and labor are too high. 
Diminished demand for steel, brick, hardware and other manufac- 
tured products, closes factories, and men are thrown out of employ- 
ment. Hard times come again. What is the solution? Work it out 
for us, somebody. 



This dear old world of ours is taking on a sad change. Once, 

a big ball of mud, stones, water, with trees growing, streams purling 
over silvery beds, and birds flying from limb to limb, it is to the 
present day observer greatly changed. The chemist, the scientist, 
the delver into the mysterious properties of matter, are so confusing 
the ordinary brain that the common man hardly knows if he is on the 
earth or off. Fluids and currents and potentialities lurk in every 
common atom. The air. once useful for breathing purposes, is now 
discovered to contain so many new and strange gases that one hesi- 
tates to take a long breath. The commonest objects are dissected 
and resolved and attenuated, and figured as containing or being 
composed of so many, more or less. ions, revolving at miraculous 
rapidities and evincing properties as strange and new as were ever 
dreamed of by the wildest astrologer of the sixteenth century. Il 
all began with a bunch of men called scientists who wanted to know- 
why the wheels go round. They think they have answered some of 
the questions, and have evolved huge mathematical formulae 
calculated to fit almost any physical condition, but just about as they 
settle down to some pet theory, somebody digs up a fact or makes 
a discovery which sets them all by the ears. I am a bit disposed to 
think the good old fashioned way not so far from comfort, and the 
dwellers on earth when the world was new, perhaps as happy as the 
pursuer of these twentieth century freaks. 



Now that the California Federation of Women's Clubs has 

taken up the question of the preservation of Lake Tahoe, we may 
expect that this beautiful body of water will be left unimpaired by 
the desecrating hand of man. The California Club of this city was 
instrumental in saving Big Basin, in the Santa Cruz mountains, and 
preserving it as a National Forest. Women never indulge in 
vandalism as much as men. 



August 14, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



The Statue 

By Eleanore F. Lewys-Ross. 



There were three lights in the room; the red flicker from the fire- 
place; the pale rays from the wintry moon, shimmering through the 
gauze curtains, and the tiny, glowing point of Wessington's cigar. 

Wessington was suffering from an acute attack of the "blue devils." 
The past was a poignant medley of rapturous memories and despair- 
ing regrets; could sorrow kill, he wondered, for the present was full 
of grief, and nothing more, and the future? Well, the future was too 
hellish to be hopeless; too filled with rebellion against Fate to be 
empty; like the gray fog that steals in from the weltering sea, 
stifling, breathing of the ocean's chill and cruelty, blurring all objects 
into an indistinct mass of nothingness, and yet unconquerable, 
inevitable. 

Wessington, sculptor, dreamer, idealist, had been married half a 
dozen years, and was still in love with his wife when she left him. 
Perhaps this statement explains Wessington's character better than 
numerous descriptive phrases. She had been his inspiration through 
the first miserably poverty-stricken years they had spent together; 
cheerful when other women would have whined; helpful when others 
of her sex would have given up in pettish rebellion ; always a sort of 
bright, magnetic little compass to point the way. And she was 
dead. 

Wessington smiled in bitter misery at thought of his answer to 
her last desire. (This desire the only selfish wish Wessington had 
ever known to have emanated from her). "I will never love another 
woman, so that if there is a life to come I can meet you without the 
memory of a touch from another woman's lips!" 

Now, as he lounged before the fire, his cigar gripped between his 
clinched teeth, his hands dug deep into the pockets of his loose 
jacket, his eyes fixed on the glowing coals as if to read therein the 
picture of what the long, weary stretch of years would bring him. 
the imige of a black despair himself, he felt a sudden mad revulsion 
against what had once been his greatest happiness. What was ail 
lo him when the creator of his best works was no longer of this 
life? 

A sudden cold breath of wind seemingly Irom the closed windows 
caused him to start and turn fiom the fire. Was thai the moonlight 
I 'ually taking life and foim? Or an illusion of his own morbidly 
sensitive nerves? For in the corner, nearly touching the lacj 
vv.t cs of the curtain, mystical, intangible, a fairy-like creation born 
of the mingling of moon and firelight, stood the pale figure of her 
who had been his wife, swaying slightly as the night wind moves pale 
meadow glasses, sweet as in life, with the same dear smile parting 
her soft lips; lips thai seemed to breathe forth an inspiring: 
'Come! Feel again your old enthusiasm of genius. Work!" 

.f ¥ y- v * * 
' What do you think of Wessington's latest >" The questioner, 
sufficiently intent on his question and his companion's answer, not to 
notice the slim figure of a girl lying indolently against the cushions 
of r. divan behind some palms, leaned forward rather eagerly. 

1 Is companion shrugged her shoulders. "It is not exactly what I 
should want in my boudoir." she answered, waving a huge black tan 
slowly back and forth. "It would seem too much like a death mask, 
for :urcly it is the image of his dead wife'" and she shuddered. 
Then she went on. dreamily; "Do you really thifik he is quite 
inconsolable? You know, it B a whole year now since his wife 
died." 

The man laughed softly. "Then you have not noticed his badly 
concealed admiration for Miss Page? He is evidently smitten, and 
yet (or some unaccountable reason, seems to think it is something 



to be avoided, suppressed, this admiration he, too — apparently feels 
for her. Wessington always was a queer duck, anyway. Why, it 
is only the always beautiful and consistent evolution of nature, this 
burning up of one emotion to make way for another. Like the fires 
made of last year's weeds, to make room for a new growth of 
grass." 

The eavesdropper slipped softly from her nest of cushions, and fled 
through the conservatory to the deserted library, her sudden move- 
ments unheeded by the two she had left behind, for the man 
(consistent as Nature herself) was proving the efficacy of "burning 
up last year's weeds." 

Left again to herself, the girl resumed her old, wearisome train of 
thought. His wife! His wife! Why did she always come between 
her and her desires? Like a poor, vague ghost of an emotion, 
jealous of its successor, the frail, uncanny spirit of the past laughed 
mockingly at the present's abortive efforts to clasp hands with 
happiness! 

¥ V ¥ $ ¥ ¥ 

All the sounds of the late night seemed to Wessington to rever- 
berate harmony. The rattling of a belated cab over the cobbles, 
the clang of the street cars, the occasional click-clr.ck of heels on 
the cement; even the "moo" of the fog-siren out in the bay, 
mournfully reminiscent of nights of blinding mist wherein vessels and 
lives had been lost ; everything had suddenly taken on a gracious 
and happy aspect and meaning. 

He had held her in his arms at last, close, close — had kissed her 
lips. She was his, this elusive, provokingly indifferent, half-frightened 
love of his life. And to him. just then, nothing else in the whole, 
wide world counted for aught. 

He slammed the front door of his flat briskly, ran up the stairs 
lightly, and after removing his coat and hat, entered his studio before 
"turning in." 

It was an action born of habit more than desire tonight, and yet 
Wessington had proved himself an alien to that cowardly class of 
people to whom habit is stronger than their rightful claim to happi- 
ness, because the former is a garment that has shaped itself so 
comfortably to their forms that they hesitate to divest themselves of 
it to | ut on new apparel. 

The room seemed strangely lonely and bare. No glowing fire 
tonight. No shimmering moon: just a few stars blinking wisely; 
and the dim yet garish light from the gas jet in the hall. 

Where was it. this lest creation of his hands? That now ranked 
only second in his best beloved belongings of life? In a crumpled 
mass at the foot of the little platform on which his models posed. 
lay the broken lumps of clay, not of the pure white that his eyes had 
led upon, but of the ghastly yellowish-gray hue of a body 
long dead. 

Had the slamming of the door unsettled il and caused its crash to 
ihc floor? Perhaps! 



For mrny years in this State there would seem almost lo have 

! ecu a premium set on incendiarism. For such inro.-ds upon the peace 
2nd quiet of the community, and the pockets of the insurance com- 
I . lines, the law seems to have given no protection. Seldom has the 
incendiary been jailed, almost ne\er convicted. The law seems to 
h.-Me considered the imurrnce companies legitimate prey of any one 
who could plunder if of an indemnity. By the law. of course, 
is meant those who make a play al administering il. All the 
sympathy of the average official appears lo be on the side of the 
insured. The mutuality of insurance does not appeal to the guardian 
of the peace more than lo the average citizen. The underwriter may 
offer rewards but the Stale never. What the remedy for this state 
of affairs may be. and one must surely exist, is hard to say. 
Indubitably the charge goes upon the consumer, the public, who 
•ie price. Like the drummer's overcoat, it is in the expense 
recount. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 14. 1920 



Gossip of Society 



The guests at the luncheon given Tuesday 
afternoon by Mrs. Patrick Calhoun and her 
two charming daughters. Miss Mildred and 
Miss Sallie Calhoun, were afforded a pleasant 
and complete surprise when the engagement 
was announced of Miss Sallie Calhoun to 
Benjamin Blackwood Foster, the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Arthur W. Foster of San Rafael. 
Miss Calhoun is a sister of Mrs. Wilson B. 
Wickox of Cleveland, Ohio, and of Mrs. Paul 
Scott Foster of San Rafael. She is a gradu- 
ate of Laurel School in Cleveland and of 
Miss Porter's School in Farrington, Conn. 
Young Foster is the brother of Paul Foster, 
Mrs. Henry Kueckler, Mrs. Lawrence Draper, 
Miss Louisiana Foster and William Foster. 
Mrs. Henry Sherman of this city is his aunt 
and he is a cousin of Mrs. William Hinckley 
Taylor, Mrs. George Boyd, Mrs. Allen Lewis, 
Mrs. Aimer Newhall, Miss Cynthia and Miss 
Jean Boyd. Nicholas Boyd, Miss Lucy and 
Miss Ysabel Sherman. He was a student at 
the University of California and completing 
his course at the outbreak of the war. He 
left college and entered the officers' training 
camp at the Presidio, and went overseas as 
a captain with the 346th field artillery. He 
is a member of the American Legion and a 
well known Bohemian club man. No date 
has been set for the wedding. 

Yesterday afternoon Mrs. Charles Kenneth 
Mcintosh complimented Mrs. Laidlaw at a 
luncheon which she gave at her home in 
Woodside. On Tuesday Mrs. Frank P. Deer- 
ing gave a luncheon at the Francesca club in 
honor of Mrs. Laidlaw. Among Mrs. Deer- 
ing's guests were: Mesdames William Den- 
man, Charles Gilman Norris; Doctors 
Aurelia Rinehart. Millicent Cosgrove. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lilburn Eyre enter- 
tained in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Laidlaw on 
Sunday at their home in Menlo Park. 

Mrs. William D. Stephens, the wife of 
Governor Stephens, has returned from Los 
Angeles and is at the Fairmont, where she 
will remain until early in September. 

George Armsby, who has been visiting in 
Santa Barbara for the past month, left early 
in the week for New York. 

Miss Anne Peters left the Fairmont on Sat- 
urday and has joined her mother, Mrs. 
Joseph D. Peters, at Casa del Rey, in Santa 
Cruz. 

Mrs. James Potter Langhome with her 
house guest, Mrs.' R. K. Stevens of Santa 
Barbara, passed the week-end in Del Monte. 

Mrs. Florence Porter Pfingst returned to 
the Fairmount on the 6th inst. Mrs. Pfingst 
has been visiting in Montecito for the last 
three weeks, and during her stay there has 
been extensively entertained. 



Mrs. Gertrude Atherton is a guest at the 
Hotel Hollywood in Los Angeles. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Herter of New York, 
who owned El Mirasol until last week, when 
they sold it to Mr. Frederick Clift of this 
city, are spending a few weeks at the resort 
and gave a large supper party there on 
August 12. Miss Ruth St. Denis went up 
from Los Angeles to dance at the affair and 
had the picturesque patio of El Mirasol for 
a setting for her dance. 

Mrs. Conde Nast and her son, Coudert 
Nast, of New York have left San Francisco 
and are in Santa Barbara. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Leroy Nickel, who have 
been motoring in the San Joaquin Valley, 
have returned to their home in Menlo. 

Don Kelly of New York is visiting in Bur- 
lingame as the house guest of William W. 
Crocker, whose classmate he was at an 
eastern college. 

One of the many delightful affairs given 
on board the battleships during the week was 
the tea which Mrs. Turner, wife of Lieuten- 
ant Commander Harry Turner, U. S. N.. of 
the U. S. S. Kansas, gave on board, Thurs- 
day, 5th inst. 

Richard Tobin, who is in town for a few 
days, was host at a delightful dinner party 
on the evening of the 4th, when he enter- 
tained in honor of Rear Admiral Andrew T. 
Long. 

Mrs. Frank Winchester was hostess at a 
tea a few days ago at her home in Marin in 
honor of Mrs. Gustav Zeil. 

Mrs. Philip E. Bowles, Jr.. chaperoned a 
Dutch treat dinner party in the rose room of 
the Palace hotel the other evening. 

Mrs. Louis F. Monteagle presided at 
luncheon on Tuesday at her home on 
Pacific avenue, complimenting Mrs. Patrick 
Calhoun. 

Count Andre de Limur was a recent host 
at a dinner which he gave in the Palm Grill 
of the Hotel Del Monte, when he entertained 
as his guests: Messrs. and Mesdames S. F. 
B. Morse. Charles Blythe. John R. Neville, 
Harry H. Scott; Miss Katherine Ramsay. 

Edward Maltby was host at a delightfully 
informal dinner party last Saturday evening 
when he entertained as his guests: Mr. and 
Mrs. Francis Langton; Misses Constance 
Hart, Vere de Vere Adams, Lorna William- 
son: Messrs. Edward Johnson. Benno Hart, 
Jr., William Veach. 

The beautiful old Lichtenberg home in San 
Rafael was the scene of an interesting recep- 
tion and dance last Saturday evening, when 
Mrs. Harry Johnson. Mrs. Alfred Du Bois and 



Miss Marie Lichtenberg entertained in honor 
of Mr. and Mrs. Gustavus Zeil and their son 
and daughter, John and Miss Charlotte Zeil, 
who have recently returned from Europe. 
About five hundred guests were invited to 
greet Mr. and Mrs. Zeil and their son and 
attractive daughter, the latter of whom will 
be one of the winter's debutantes. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Sartori of Los Angeles 
are in San Francisco for a few days, stopping 
at the Palace. 

Miss Margaret Madison was luncheon 
hostess Monday at her charming home in 
Ross, complimenting the bride of her brother, 
Marshall Madison, the former Miss Elena 
Eyre. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Kuhn and the Misses 
Catherine and Dolly Kuhn and Wendell Kuhn 
are guests at El Mirasol in Santa Barbara, 
accompanied by Mrs. Williamr Scaife of 
Pittsburg and her daughter. Miss Helen 
Scaife. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Mayo Newhall were 
hosts at an informal luncheon at the St. 
Francis Monday when they had among their 
guests: Messrs. and Mesdames Wm. Mayo 
Newhall, Jr., Lawrence McCreery; Miss 
Helen Garritt. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Poett, with the Misses 
Evelyn Poett and Emily Timlow and Harry 
Poett, Jr., have returned to their home in San 
Mateo after a visit at Lake Tahoe. 

A delightful affair of Wednesday was the 
reception and tea which Mrs. Arthur W. 
Foster gave in honor of Mrs. Patrick Calhoun 
and Miss Mildred and Miss Sally Calhoun, all 
of whom have been the inspiration for many 
interesting affairs. 

Prince Carol of Rumania arrived in San 
Francisco on the S. S. Korea Maru, and 
during his stay will be at the St. Francis. 

Mr. and Mrs. James R. R. Cromwell have 
arrived from the East on their wedding trip 
and are at the St. Francis. Mr. Cromwell is 
the son of Mrs. Edward T. Stotesbury of 
Philadelphia and a sister of Mrs. Cromwell 
Brooks, both of whom visited San Francisco 
during the Exposition. Mr. Cromwell's father 
was the late Mr. Oliver Cromwell of Wash- 
ington. He is a famous yachtsman and was 
one of the first to offer his yacht to the 
United States Government at the time of the 
entry of this country into the war, and it was 
used as a scout patrol. 

Mrs. William Miller Graham gave a dinner 
for Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels of San 
Francisco Thursday evening, 5th inst., at 
"Bellosguardo," her home on the cliffs over- 
looking the Santa Barbara channel. 

One of the largest balls given in London 
last month was that at which Mrs. Thomas 
Fermor Hesketh and Hon Mrs. Willis were 
hostesses. It took place at Claridge's and 
was one of the festivities given in connection 
with the big lawn tennis matches at Wimble- 



August 14, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



don for the championship of the world. It 
was the next in importance socially to the 
dinner and ball given at Londonderry House 
for the king and queen of England. Mrs. 
Hesketh, who was Miss Florence Brecken- 
ridge, of San Francisco, and is the daughter 
of Mrs. Frederick Sharon, is spending the 
season at her London house, 7 Rutland Gate. 
She is taking part in most of the social affairs 
of the gayest season London has seen since 
the war. 

Complimenting her two attractive 
daughters-in-law, Mrs. Paul McKee and Mrs. 
Donald McKee, Mrs. John Dempster McKee 
entertained at a delightful tea at her summer 
home in Ross valley Monday afternoon. 
Miss Bessie Jewett, a sister of Mrs. Paul 
McKee, and who is visiting here from her 
home in Plainfield, N. J., shared the honors 
of the afternoon. 

Miss Elizabeth Burnham and Dr. Harold 
Hill were married in Berkeley on the 8th inst. 
at the home of the bride's father. Dr. Clark 
Burnham, with Rev. W. R. H. Hodgkin of 
St. Mark's Episcopal church officiating. 

Tuesday the home of Mrs. Paul Foster in 
Ross was the scene of a luncheon when Mrs. 
Patrick Calhoun and her two daughters, the 
Misses Sally and Mildred Calhoun, enter- 
tained the Marin county set. 

Mrs. Edward H. Harriman, who arrived 
here Tuesday and is at the Fairmont, will be 
here a fortnight, and will then go to Santa 
Barbara, where her youngest son, Mr. Roland 
Harriman, and his wife have bought a sev- 
eral hundred acre ranch. 

The illness of Mr. Parmer Fuller in Vienna 
is causing his relatives and friends here much 
concern. He is in a serious condition from a 
nervous breakdown following the influenza. 
Mrs. Fuller, who was here visiting his rela- 
tives, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Pike, is with her 
husband in Vienna. 

General and Mrs. Hunter Liggett rc- 
turnedl from the North on Saturday and are 
at their home at Fort Mason. They had a 
delightful trip to Alaska and also visited 
Yellowstone Park. 

Mrs. Alpheus Bull has been passing 
the summer months with her sons and 
daughters, Alpheus. Henry, Miss Newell Bull 
and Mrs. Edward Bullard. in Mill Valley. 

Mrs. Spencer Eddy, who recently visited 
her grandmother, Mrs. Eleanor Dore. in San 
Mateo, will sail from New York this month, 
with Mr. Eddy, for their home in Paris. She 
is now visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Augustus Spreckels, at their country estate 
in the Manhasset section of Long Island. 
The Spreckels bought the place from Louis 
Sherry, of New York, and it is one of the 
most beautiful in the vicinity. The house is 
copied from the Chateau de Madrid, the 
shooting box of Francis I in the Bois de 
Bologne. 

Prescott Scott was host at a dinner a lew 



evenings ago in the Palm Grill of the Hotel 
del Monte. Among his guests were: Messrs. 
and Mesdames Roger Lapham, Francis 
McComas, Harry H. Scott, Mrs. Willard 
Drown. 

Mrs. Russell Deane, her small son, Jack 
Deane, and her sister, Miss Elinor Wood, 
arrived here from the East on Sunday. Mrs. 
Deane will visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
John wood. 

Miss Marie Louise Baldwin returned from 
the East Tuesday and joined her mother, 
Mrs. William Sproule, and Mr. Sproule at 
their home in Sacramento street. Miss 
Baldwin has been away since the early sum- 
mer and has been visiting her grandparents 
in Newport and friends on Long Island and 
at Orange, New Jersey. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hill Vincent are 
building at Pebble Beach and their home will 
probably be completed in September. 

Isaac Requa is visiting in Santa Barbara. 

Mr. and Mrs. Will Jacks of Monterey are 
at the Palace. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Barr McCutcheon 
have purchased property at Pebble Beach, 
where they will build a home. 

Among the Californians spending this sum- 
mer in Europe are Dr. and Mrs. Max Roths- 
child, who are now in Switzerland, after a 
visit to Paris. Mrs. Rothschild recently took 
part in a golf tournament held at Lausanne 
and played with some of the best golfers of 
Switzerland. 

Mrs. Wendel P. Hammon was hostess at a 
luncheon, which she gave last Friday at El 
Mirasol, in honor of Mrs. Charles Butters and 
Mrs. M. R. Rickard of Oakland. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hooper motored 
down to Del Monte, and will return to their 
home in Woodside in a few days. 

Miss Maye Colburn is summering at her 
attractive home in San Rafael, and will re- 
turn to her apartments at the Fairmont in the 
fall. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lund, Jr., and their 
daughters. Miss Beatrice and Miss Marion 
Lund, have returned from Santa Barbara, 
where they have been visiting for the past 
six months. 



SOCIAL NOTES, HOTEL DEL MONTE 

One of the recent visitors to Del Monte 
was the well known Mrs. Billie Hilt, who 
was formerly Katherine Elkins and for whom 
the Duke D'Abruzzi, one of the heirs to the 
Italian throne, attempted to give up his claim 
to his royal position. This incident a few- 
years ago created qnitr an international stir. 
Mrs. Hitt was a tremendous beauty at the 
time and very well known socially in Europe 
and this country. This interesting visitor 
while at Del Monte engaged actively in the 
out-of-door diversions ind found occasion to 
take in the famous se\cnteen-mile drive. 



Colonel and Mrs. J. Hudson Poole are to 
join the fashionable colony at Pebble Beach. 
They have purchased the La Casa Suya, 
meaning in Spanish "your own home." The 
interior decorations of the house were done 
by Mrs. Edgar De Wolfe and was especially 
designed to fit into the scenic surroundings. 
It is situated on a knoll overlooking the 
second fairway of the new Pebble Beach golf 
course. Colonel and Mrs. Poole and their 
children have been making a stay at Del 
Monte Lodge for the past several weeks and 
have been quite extensively entertained. 
Colonel Poole married a sister of the very 
well known Bill Bowin of Seattle. The 
Colonel has a fine war record. He is a West 
Pointer and was some years out of the service 
but went back at the beginning of the war 
as Colonel of Engineers. He was sent almost 
immediately to France where he distin- 
guished himself so well that he was decorated 
by the French government with the Legion 
d'Honneur, the highest decoration at the dis- 
posal of the French government. Colonel 
and Mrs. Poole have been residing in 
Southern California where they have been 
prominent in social circles. They are equally 
well known in Detroit. 

Another prominent name to be added to 
the list of property owners at Pebble Beach 
is that of George Barr McCutcheon. He has 
purchased a three-acre piece in an enviable 
location. Mr. and Mrs. McCutcheon have 
been delighted with Pebble Beach and the 
surroundings there, where they have been 
enjoying the summer. They will form a 
valuable addition to the rapidly growing ex- 
clusive colony. 



AT CASA DEL REY 



Mr. George Sutherland, senator from Utah, 
is out here with his wife from Washington. 
D. C. where they have been making their 
home for the past few years. They are mak- 
ing a tour of the State, stopping at the Casa 
Del Rey for a few days, then going to the 
Big Trees and from there they will leave for 
San Francisco, where they will remain sev- 
eral weeks at the Palace hotel. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. L. Rathbone, Mrs. Charles 
Templeton Crocker. Mr. Walter S. Martin 
and Captain R. Banon of London were a 
congenial party who motored down to Santa 
Cruz for the week-end. making their home 
at the Casa Del Rey while there. 

Anna Peters spent a few^lays at the 
hotel with her mother, Mrs. J. D. Peters and 
sister. Mrs. C. L. Six. who have been there 
several weeks. They were joined by Mr. 
John C. Jackman of New York. 



When a woman who is not yet engaged 
buys five new hats at once, it is a sign that 
she is about to begin a new offen 
Smart Set. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 14, 1920 



Interview With Sydney Greenbie 

By Joseph Anthony 



"When Lao Tze, king of Chinese philos- 
ophers, propounded his wisdom some thou- 
sands of years ago, he was starting more 
things than he had counted on. For one 
thing, the wise man of China taught that 
it was not necessary to travel to learn the 
ways of the world — all one had to do was 
to reach out his hand, or to gaze in his own 
back yard, in order to have all things within 
his compass. But I wonder whether any 
man who ever came under his wonderful 
influence agieed with the master in that! 
For my own part. Lao Tze rooted me up 
from a comfortable job as a schoolmaster 
in California, dumped me in Australia be- 
fore I was fairly aware of what I was doing, 
whirled me off again to Hong Kong, and 
set me down in the city of Kobe, with 
seventy-five cents in my pockets, to get a 
working acquaintance with the Orient." 

The narrator was Sydney Greenbie, 
settled down comfortably again in his New 
York home after the two years of tramping, 
hand-to-mouth living, householding and 
teaching in the Orient, told of in his book. 
"Japan: Real and Imaginary." "And that 
was how I got a working acquaintance with 
the Orient," said Mr. Greenbie, pausing re- 
flectively. 

"But whether Lao Tze would approve of 
me as a disciple or not, I can't say that I 
regret the tangent he shot me off on," con- 
tinued Mr. Greenbie. "I was engaged in 
running an experimental school along new 
educational lines, started by a wealthy 
student friend. I had done some writing, 
too, but on the whole I was getting settled 
down in a very comfortable rut when I first 
came into a head-on collision with the 
Chinese philosopher. 

In Kobe With 75 Cents 

"In the end, it was the vagaries of the 
passport office that mapped out my course 
for me. I was bound for China, of course. 
When I discovered at the Consulate in Aus- 
tralia that there would be some delay about 
my passport, I asked that it be sent on to 
Hong Kong, and for Hong Kong I headed. 
I got there, and waited — but no passport. 
My funds were getting low, and I could not 
wait there forever. Once more I left word 
for my passport to be forwarded, and took 
the steamer for Kobe. I landed in Japan 
without a passport, a definite destination 
or a visible means of earning a living, and 
with just seventy-five cents in money to see 
me through. The Orient was waiting for me 
— even though it wasn't China — and I 
struck out. 



"As I look back upon the experience 
now," continued the author of "Japan: 
Real and Imaginary," "I believe the most 
fortunate single incident of the whole ad- 
venture was my landing in Kobe almost 
penniless. With even a little more money 
at my disposal, paying my way in American 
fashion, I could never have seen Nippon as 
I did. Even as it was, in the cheap native 
boarding house I went to for my first night 
in Japan, they first assured me that the 
accommodations were unworthy, then tried 
desperately hard to serve me what they 
conceived to be American food. And, by 
the way, once I was admitted to life with 
the native on even terms, I had to pay the 
penalty of the curiosity seeker by finding 
that I was something of a curiosity myself. 
That night, and during all the months in 
Japan that followed, I found that if an 
American wanted to live like a Japanese he 
would have to forfeit privacy, as the Japa- 
nese habitually did. One could always have 
a screen at the entrance to his room, of 
course — but a poking finger can work won- 
ders with a Japanese screen! 

At the Gion Matsuri Pageant 

"But the question of money was a more 
pressing problem than that. I was fortunate 
enough to get clerical work at an American 
office to tide -me over for a few days. Even- 
ings I followed the current, absorbing every 
Japanese word I could, watching the street 
processions, the worshipping of Buddhas, the 
life of my Japanese boarding house, as I was 
admitted to more of its intimacies." 
Modernized But Not Modern 

"Japan is modernized, but Japan is not 
modern. When I set up for myself a little 
house measured by the length of four mats, 
and there entertained guests and entered 
into the life of the street and town, I had 
a chance to see the Japan underneath the 
show of cherry blossoms and pageantry — 
and underneath the show of commercial 



efficiency, for that matter. Shintoism, the 
love and worship of trees, rivers, and the 
great god of pantheism, is not dead. 
Buddhism is alive in the heart of the country. 
"As for the political and social institu- 
tions of the country today, there is a good 
deal to be criticized, and in writing my book 
I thought I had much more than a personal 
narrative to tell. It is still a crime in Japan 
to circulate any reference to the Emperor, 
except in the most reverent terms. The 
courts, in ordinary cases, waver between an 
easy-going indulgence and the extremest 
kind of ciuelty. And the tourist who sees 
the pretty things of the land of cherry blos- 
soms does not see the legions of hunger- 
pinched and diseased children. But if the 
imaginary Japan is the prettier of the two, 
the real Japan is one of quite as interesting 
discoveries. America will come to know 
it before long." " 



Tin 
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August 14. 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



II 



Library Table 



Heart Troubles 

The Funk & Wagnalls Company has re- 
cently published a most valuable volume on 
"Heart Troubles; Their Prevention and Re- 
lief." written by Louis Faugeres Bishop. M. 
D., professor of diseases of the heart and 
circulation at Fordham University, and presi- 
dent of the Good Samaritan dispensary, New 
York. 

This book contains an authoritative dis- 
cussion of this subject written in an easy 
popular style and avoiding the use of obscure 
technical terminology. It is designed for the 
guidance and help of the layman who suffers 
from heart trouble or for the family or imme- 
diate relatives of such sufferers, and es- 
pecially for the nurses in charge of these 
cases. It describes the various types of heart 
diseases in a most lucid and informing way 
and tells exactly what should be done in each 
case, the mode of life best suited to the 
trouble, the most beneficial diet, etc. Its 
cheery optimism and sane counsel should 
prove of real service not only to all heart 
patients, but also to physicians, who can 
obtain much valuable information from the 
instructions it gives. 

"Heart Troubles," Funk & Wagnalls, New 
York. $3.00 net. 



Book Notes from the Century Co. 

Seven books for publication on August 13 
are announced by The Century Company: 
"Mac of Placid," a novel of the Adiiondacks 
country by T. Monis Longstreth; "It's a 
Good Old World," by Biuce Barton; "Every- 
day Americans," by Henry Seidel Canby; 
"America's Aims and Asia's Aspirations," by 
Patrick Gallagher; "The Crimson Patch." by 
Augusta Huiell Seamon; "Us and the Bottle- 
Man." by Edith Ballingcr Price, and "The 
Mystery of the Sea-Lark," by Ralph Henry 
Barbour and H. P. Holt, the last three being 
books for young people. 

The Century Company is putting into print 
again "The Strangling of Persia." by W. 
Morgan Shuster. During the war a third 
edition was exhausted, and because of diffi- 
culties in the printing trade a new edition wrs 
not ordered. A continued demand for the 
book has necessitated a new printing and its 
restoration to the list of The Century Com- 
pany. Asked if in view ol the new printing 
ho wished to make any corrections in this 
volume which caused so much discussion 
when it was originally published, the author 
replied that he had no changes to suggest. 
that time had vindicated his statement of 
facts and long consideration had made all 
the firmer his convictions based on the facts. 



A seventh large edition of Frederick 
O'Brien's "White Shadows in the South 
Seas" is announced by The Century Com- 
pany. Other seventh editions announced by 
Ihe Century Company are "A Book of 
Cheerful Cats," by J. G. Francis, and "Baby 
Days" by Mary Mapes Dodge. A new print- 
ing of Kipling's "The Jungle Book," is 
marked the forty-fourth. 

Admirers of Marie Conway Oemler's 
"Slippy McGee," and they are a small army, 
to judge from the frequent reprintings of the 
novel, will be interested to know that The 
Century Company will publish early in the 
autumn a new novel by her entitled "The 
Purple Heights." The new story is set in 
the South, as were her first two novels, this 
one in Riverton, South Carolina. The chief 
figure is Peter Devereaux Champneys, the 
last of the once powerful family of the 
Champneys. But when the novel opens Peter 
is a little boy and his widowed mother is 
living in a small three-room house by the 
river. There are only the two of them, and 
she dies from too little food and too much 
work; and Peter is left alone to work out his 
destiny. 

In his discussion of the manufacture of 
artificial silk, a new industry to which this 
country is now turning as a relief from the 
H. C. of L.. Dr. Edwin E. Slosson, in his new 
book. "Creative Chemistry," introduces the 
main ingredient, by a lew witty comments 
on the pure form of it as it appears as paper. 
"At last man has risen to the level of the 
worm and can spin threads to suit himself. 
He can rival the wasp in the making of 
paper. He is no longer dependent upon the 
flax and the cotton plant, but grinds up 
trees to get his cellulose. A New York 
newspaper uses up nearly 2000 acres of 
forest a year. Cellulose can not serve as 
food although some ol the vegetarian ani- 
mals, notably the goat, have a digestive 
apparatus that can handle it. It is not likely 
that the human stomach even under the 
pressure of famine is able to get much nutri- 
ment out of sawdust. But by digesting with 
dilute acid sawdust can be transformed into 
siisais. and these by fermentation into rlco- 
hol. so it would be possible lor a man after 
he had re.d his morning paper to get drunk 
on it." 



DR. WM. W. HOAGLAND 

DENTIST 
PERFECT SSRViel IKS 

Office., 908 Market St . T hird F loor 
TELEPHONE GARFIELD 835 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Sts. 
Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without 

dining in the finest cafe in America 
Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75 c 

Dinner $1.75 



CLOCK 
REPAIRING 




ALL MAKES 
OF CLOCKS 
REPAIRED 



WATCH DEPARTMENT 
Chimes and complicated clocks a specially 
Clocks kept in order by contract, town and 

country 
We carry an attractive line of new clocks 
-Work guaranteed in every detail 

CALIFORNIA CLOCK CO 

418-19 Whi.ney BIdg. 133 Ceary Street 

Phone Garfield 2570 J. Topping, Manager 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 

PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 
Offices— 505-507— 323 Geary Street 

Phone Douglas 2433 



SUMMONS 

105936 

In the Superior Court of ihe Slate of California 

in and for the City and County of San Francisco. 
Olga Elizabeth Ennis, Plaintiff. 

vs. 
John Cradock F.nnis. Defendant. 

Action brought in the Superior Courl of ihe 
Stale of t alitnmia in and for the City and County 
of San Francisco, and the complaint filed in the 
office of the County Clerk of said City and County. 

The people of ihe State of California send greet- 
lohn Cradock I nnis and Mrs. J. Avrillaud. 
Defendants. 

^ "ii are hereby required to appear in an action 
brought against you by the above named Plaintiff in 
ihe Superior Court of the Stale of California, in 
and for ihe City and Counly of San Francisco, and 
lo answer the Complain! filed therein within len days 
(exclusive of the day of service) after the service on 
you of this summons, if served within this City and 
01 il served elsewhere within ihitty days. 

The said action is brought lo obtain a judgment 
and decree of this Court dissolving the bonds of 
matrimony now existing l>elwecn plaintiff and de- 
fendant, on the ground of defendant lohn Cradock 
f .nnis' adultery with said Mrs. J. Avrillaud. and of 
n ( radork Ennis' desertion of plaintiff, also 
for general relief, as will more fully appear in the 
Complaint on file, to which special reference is 
hereby made. 

.And vnu are hereby notified that, unless you ap- 
t-ear and answer as above required, the said Plain- 
rff will tnkr ludnmenl for any moneys or damages 
demanded in the Complaint as arising upon contract. 
or will apply lo the Courl for any other relief de- 
manded in the Complaint. 

Given under my hand and the Seal of the Super- 
ri of the State of California, in and for the 
Cm and Counlv of San Francisco, this 15th day of 
April A. D. 1920. 

(Seal) H. I. MULCREVY. Clerk. 

By L. J. WELCH. Deputv Clerk 

Frank D. Macbeth. 506 Humboldt Bank Bld« . Su 

Francisco. Cal.. Attornev for Plaintiff. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 14, 1920 



Sunbeams 



Very Fat Wife — Kiss me, dear. 
Very Lean Husband — I will when I get 
around to it. — Life. 



Friend — How did you ever get such a 
pleasant expression on that homely Miss 
Passee's portrait? 

Artist — I got her to telling me about men 
she might have married. — Boston Transcript. 



"Of course, you would never think of de- 
serting your party?" 

"Never!" said Senator Sorphum. "On 
the contrary, it sometimes takes quick work 
on my part to keep my party from deserting 
men." — Washington Star. 



Knicker — Did your father give you an 
auto? 

Bocker — Yes, but he didn't endow it. — 
Lippincott's. 



"Well, I beat Borrowly out of $4 just 

now." 

"How in the world did you do it?" 
"Oh, he struck me for five and I lent him 

one." — Boston Transcript. 



Owen (telling about narrow escape) — As 
I went down for the second time all the 
events of my life passed before me. 

Oke — Did you think of that $10 you owe 
me? — Dallas Saturday night. 



Of all the dollies there was only one with 
which Ruby and Eda cared to play. Both 
wanted it at once. "I tell you, Eda," said 
Ruby at last, "you can be the nurse and I'll 
be the mamma." "All right," agreed Eda 
joyfully. "Hand me the baby, then," quickly 
commanded Ruby. "This is your Thursday 
afternoon off." — Life. 



There was a wild and frenzied scatterment. 
Men, white-faced and staring-eyad, fled as if 
pursued by a pestilence. They dropped what- 
ever they had in hand and stood not upon 
the order of their going, but departed like 
frightened roebucks, hitting only the high 
places as they went. 

"Why are the people fleeing?" we asked. 

"A candidate who calls himself 'the friend 
of the people' has just come to town," replied 
an innocent bystander who had no vote. — 
Kansas City Star. 



Never judge the uses of a thing by its 
appearance. Men, who never cry, carry 
handkerchiefs big enough, for a whale to 
weep into. — Smart Set. 



OIL FOR THE NAVY 

The Associated Oil company announced 
recently that it has offered formally to the 
Navy Department to furnish whatever may 
be its equitable pro rata of fuel oil to care 
for Pacific Coast needs until September 30 
at the present pipe line terminal market price 
of $2.00 per barrel. 

1 he company announced it has no fuel oil 
whatever in excess of its commercial cus- 
tomers' needs and is drawing heavily on its 
reserve stocks, but nevertheless recognizes 
the essential needs of the Navy and is will- 
ing to take its share of the load. The fol- 
lowing statement was issued by the executive 
committee this week. 

"In view of the widely published and con- 
flicting statements about the so-called "seiz- 
ure" of oil by the Navy, the executive com- 
mittee of the Associated Oil company has 
authorized the following statement: 

First. The Associated Oil company has 
at all times recognized the Navy's essential 
need for oil and at all times is willing as 
a patriotic obligation, aside from any other 
motive, to supply the Navy with the allot- 
ment falling to the Associated Oil company, 
as determined by its relative capacity to 
furnish fuel oil. 

Second. Independent, however, of any 
question of allotment, the Associated Oil 
company has never failed to meet any de- 
mand of the Navy for oil. During the past 
three years the Navy has declined to pay the 
market price which all other consumers have 
paid, offering figures below the market price 
and leaving to the future any question of 
adjustment. To protect its claims for the 
market prices the Associated Oil company 
has recognized the demands instead of the 
ordinary purchase requisitions of the Navy 
for oil, result being the so-called seizures, 
which are seizures only in a technical sense, 
as the facilities of the oil company have been 
as freely and as fully at the command of the 
Navy in making the oil deliveries as they are 
for any other customer. 

Third. All questions of past prices of oil 
delivered to the Navy up to June 30 recently 
have been adjusted with Admiral Coontz in 
Washington. The present question is whether 
or no the current market price or the offer 
of the Navy of $1.72 at San Francisco bay 
points shall govern. We anticipate this will 



be amicably adjusted. The Associated Oil 
company is willing to accept for the three 
months ending September 30 a price of $2 
per barrel for its share or the obligation to 
furnish the Navy fuel oil at its pipe line 
terminals on San Francisco bay. At Los 
Angeles and San Diego it has no tankage or 
pipe line facilities. 

"In this connection attention is directed to 
the urgent need for the conservation of fuel 
oil by all consumers and the encouragement 
in every proper way of greater production. 
The demand is far outrunning the supply. 
The greatly increased cost of labor and the 
shortage in casing supply, together with the 
lessened proved areas in which to drill, have 
resulted in a material slowing up in develop- 
ment work. The six hundred producing oil 
companies in this State should be encouraged 
in every way possible to proceed with their 
work of development and exploration." 



TWO PUZZLES 

The way of a man with a maid — 

Define and foresee it who can? 
But, bashful or bold or afraid, 

Whatever his nation or clan, 
She's ready to meet it half-way, 

To help or to hinder his plan ; 
And there's surely the devil to pay 

If his methods are under the ban! 

Oh, the way of a man with a maid — 
Give thought to that problem who can; 

My health and my intellect fade 

O'er the way of a maid with a man ! 

— Wright Field in Munsey's. 



PLEASURE AT MARQUARD'S 

You may choose any or all of 26 dishes, 
from Marquard's "continental style" 
luncheon; or you can pick out any of the 
Ready to Serve Specials, each of which is 
only 50c, and which really constitutes a meal 
in itself. 

The nightly revue sparkles with fun, the 
music is sprightly, the dancing is contagious, 
the service is courteous, and the whole at- 
mosphere is charged with the elixir of good 
living and refined pleasure. Marquard's is 
the successor of Solari's old grill, at the 
corner of Geary and Mason streets. 




L. E. PENNIMAN 

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA DISTRIBUTOR OF 

Ensign Carburetors 

605 VAN NESS AVENUE 
Near Turk St. San Francisco 

PHONE PROSPECT 5610 



August 14. 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



Pleasure's Wand 

"We Obey No Wand But Pleasure's" 

By "Casu." 



C-r-r-r-ime at the Alcazar 

A foul murder hath been done here and 
we settle comfortably into our seats to see 
that the villain is found and brought to 
justice. We know that every one in the play 
is going to be suspected and that in the end 
the finger of the hero will be pointed at the 
very last person we should think of in con- 
nection with the crime, but when we come to 
consider it, he is quite the only one who 
could possibly have done the deed. A brief, 
wordless and highly dramatic prologue acts 
as "aperitif" to our appetite for the mystery 
that follows. In a dark room with only the 
red glow of a reading lamp, we see a quiet 
figure in an arm chair. The stillness is in- 
tense. Not a sound. Then we feel another 
person enter the room. We see a hand pick 
up a shining silver paper cutter from the 
table. We know the weapon rises and falls 
swiftly and surely upon the reader. We hear 
a low moan or two. The scene is ended. 
. . . . A murmur of nervous laughter 
runs through the audience. There is nothing 
at which to laugh, but the sudden let-up ol 
nerve tension affects us that way, and we 
make funny little noises in our throats. 

Well, the play runs its inevitable course. 
We have a young and enthusiastic lad whose 
ambition is to be a detective. He is a 
protege of the hero a gentleman who detects 
just because he is so talented in that line he 
can't help it. This super-detector smokes 
cigars in a lippy manner, patronizes the 
police department, and knows SO much 
more than the rest of us about this cur-rime 
that he has to lower his lengthy lashes over 
his handsome eyes occasionally, in order to 
suppress any tell-tale glances. 

The Elderly Scholar, a nice, stout, honest. 
GOOD old man (please keep your eye on the 
Professor) calls on this here smooth spoken 
Sherlock, and tells in a broken voice, wel 
with a strong man's tears, that they'll be ar- 
resting him for the murder, while of course he 
is innocent. Why, of course he is innocent! 
We feel indignant at the very thought of this 
dear old literary party being connected with 
the Crime. Hero lips his cigar and tells him 
not to worry: the matter is in the hands of 
one who never errs. 

Then we have the Police Inspector and the 
Plain Clothes Man and the Matron (no. not 
police court matron. — society kind, called 
matron to distinguish her from a sister who 
is unmarried) all good types: we ha\e a 
nephew of the murdered man ; the program 
tells us is "a man about town." and our 



own judgment tells us that must be the only 
thing he is a man about. The butler plays 
his part so well that we feel sure he did the 
murder; a hang-dog looking fellow, — oh, 
yes, he's the one! Ha, ha! He is nothing 
of the sort. He's a pure and innocent man, 
the Matron's own brother, in fact, who was 
punished for some one else's forgery, and 
buttles to forget his troubles. 

An ex-convict, loved by the murdered 
man's housemaid, next claims our suspicions. 
Things are so against him that we lose all 
hope of his being exonerated, and that is sad 
because the girl who loves him is a lovely 
young creature who wins our hearts at 
once. 

The garrulous housekeeper does the only 
real acting in the play. The slovenly lodg- 
ing house proprietress had a good part and 
a fair conception of it. It would be worth 
her while to have a stiff course in stage train- 
ing, voice production and close study of 
character parts. She has "the makings." 

The last act arrives. With the rising of 
the curtain our hopes ascend. There's friend 
hero-detective with a superior smile curving 
his perfect lips. All will soon be well. He 
very politely ousts the inspector person from 
official desk, sits down behind it, summons 
with a fair hand (which now holds a cigar- 
el tc; the cigar lasted through five scenes and 
we can ask no more of it) the rest of the 
company,— all suspects by this time, — bids 
them be seated in a semi-circle, and proceeds 
to bawl them out one after another in the 
most gentlemanly manner (albeit crushing) 
and to enlighten us in the audience as to the 
murder. 

The ex-convict did not do it because he is 
left-handed, so he and his girl embrace 
tightly. The butler did not do it. for is he 
not the matron's brother and how could he? 



The nephew did not do it; he could not do 
anything much. The housekeeper did not do 
it, but she did give us a delightful perform- 
ance. The arms of the law did not do it. 
Silly to even mention that. The protege did 
not do it. (I like that boy.) "Cherchez la 
femme?" No, the ladies are all acquitted. 
The hero? How DARE you suggest such a 
thing? 

Well? 

After it was all cleaned up and everybody 
was happy, I saw the hero approach the 
Matron, lift her hand to his now tender lips 
and that one glimpse made me quite certain 
they were going to live happily ever after. 

© © © 
The Orpheum 

I have a "trade last" for the Orpheum 
policeman! And it's from a New Yorker at 
that. We all know how very unusual it is 
for those Gothamites to find anything admir- 
able outside of their own strip of an Island; 
I took my New York friend to the Orpheum 
this evening just to show him careless-like 
that the entire universe is not bounded by 
Hoboken on the west. His ejaculations of 
appreciation began with the paliceman and 
continued through the evening, and when 
I've written these few lines I shall go to bed 
with the sweet assurance that "San Fran- 
cisco knows how" and even New Yorkers 
have to admit it. 

What he said about the policeman? Oh, 
I'm not going to tell it here. I shall save 
that till next week and pass it on to him 
direct. Easier to tell him what another 
person thinks about him than to voice my 
own enormous admiration, which has been 
trembling on my lips these many months. 

Miss Georgia Campbell, Southern Lady, 
Charmer, and Beautiful Belle, in her "dream 
of the old South," gave an entertainment this 
evening that delighted those in her audience 
who do not know the South, and sent a 
poignant pang of pleasure to the heart of 
one who was born there and loves it well. 
The dim. old-fashioned drawing-room, the 
deferential darky butler, the mint juleps that 
he brought when he saw "Miss Gawga's" 
three gentlemen friends approaching, take 



The New Society Blue Book 

Wishes to announce that they are now making ready for press. 
This book will contain the names and addresses, phones, etc.. of 
the most prominent families in San Francisco. Alameda Co.. 
A\arin Co . San Wateo Co.. etc. Also men and women's clubs of 
high social standing. 

For Resi nations and Addresses. Communicate With 

Marguerite M. Pinchard, Publisher 

/65>» Mason St. "Phone Franklin 6912 San Frantlxo. Cat. 

Subscription Price SS.00 Per Year 




14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 14, 1920 



the spectator right across the Mason and 
Dixon line. Miss Campbell has a voice of 
exquisite quality and sings with indescribable 
charm a number of quaint old ditties of the 
South. She does not attempt anything big. 
She is an artist. Everything she does is 
perfect. Her dainty coquetry and delight- 
badinage with her three suitors are of the 
South, southern. It is a very unusual "act" 
that she presents — so genuinely good and 
true to life that it hardly seems like acting, 
but a bit of the real thing. Robert Buchanan. 
Archie Ruggles and George Sutton, who 
assist her. are thoroughly musical, — and that 
is saying a great deal. 

The Harry Hayden company gave a very 
amusing one-act play called "The Love 
Game" with four good actors who did their 
cleverly conceived parts very well indeed. 
I wonder who wrote it? 

I cannot recall an evening at the Orpheum 

when I have seen so many really good things. 

Frank Dobson is still "carryin' on" and 

George .Austin Moore, in songs and stories. 

has a southern dialect that is too good to be 

false. Betcha that boy knows who Robert 

E. Lee was! 

# * * 

The Frivolities are continuing to frivo- 
lovously frivol at the Columbia, and the 
whole thing has a metropolitan atmosphere 
that begins at the sidewalk where the 
limousines turn out their smartly dressed 



occupants into the brilliant foyer of the 
theatre, and pervades the handsome play- 
house, before as well as behind the footlights. 
We are not three thousand miles from New 
York, theatrically, as long as the enterprising 
managers of the Columbia bring such shows 
as this to our Coast. They are our Magic 
Carpet, and all the glories of Broadway are 
placed before us, without any of its attend- 
ant detractiveness. 

Next week, "The Humming Bird" with 
Maude Fulton and a fine cast. Hooray! The 
life of the theatre-goer is a joyous one 
after all. 

* * ■:■ 

The second week of the Jane Cowl engage- 
ment is drawing larger audiences than even 
the first rush, and it looks as if a third and 
then a fourth week would still find her hosts 
of admirers crowding the theatre. "It is like 
having a beautiful dream, seeing that play," 
said an enthusiastic lady the other evening, 
"all so perfect, so poetic, so sweet." Like a 
dream it is; not one of those vague, vanishy. 
tantalizing dreams that one cannot recall, but 
an inspirational vision whose details are im- 
pressed on the memory and held dear. 

Advance Announcements 

The Alcazar is having a wonderful summer 
season. There was never a time in its history 
when greater variety of widely contrasting 



dramatic successes were presented in rapid 
weekly succession. The skillful arrangement 
of plays exerts universal appeal to theatre- 
goers who want constant variety. From this 
week's thrilling entanglements of "The 
Crimson Alibi," there follows next Sunday 
\i\id contrast in "Why Marry!" the satirical 
comedy of marriage and divorce by Jesse 
Lynch Williams, in which Nat Goodwin was 
winning triumphs when his sudden summons 
came. It is one of the most brilliantly intel- 
lectual, and yet delightfully amusing 
comedies that any American dramatist has 
conceived. The persons involved are Dudley 
Ayr.es and Inez Ragan, as the idealistic 
young scientists, madly in love and defiant 
of public opinion; Henry Shumer as the 
philosophical judge; Brady Kline, Gladys 
Ernmons and Ben Erway as social climbers; 
Frederick Green as the butler and Al Cun- 
ningham as the well inlentioned clergyman 
who cannot stifle his conscience. 

Revival of "Peg O' My Heart" for the 
week of August 22, becomes a necessity to 
satisfy the demands of thousands away on 
vacation, or unable to secure seats during the 
phenomenal engagement of a month ago. 
The Alcazar's presentation of this romance 
has never been surpassed. 

An unusual vaudeville bill, headed by 
Singer's Midgets in their own enlarged act of 
ten scenes and one hour's duration, is the 







Here are the Five Dainty Principals in one of the Drama* if be unfolded at the Orpheum next mccl( 
by Singer's Midgets. The leading mar. also is i 



August 14. 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



SAM I-RAMC1SCO 



\« S)AUOlVI\V.V.fc 




J O^^^WrA.&^auX ^ | 



All Next Week— Starling Sunday 

SINGER'S MIDGETS 

IN THEIR NMY LAKliJiK ACT 

GEORG I A CAMPBELL | DOOLEV & ST OREV 

RAYMOND WYLIE & COMPANY 
RO Y LA PEARL & CO, I GOWNt & ALBERT 

MISSES SHAW & CAMBELL 

WILLA & HAROLD BROWlvE 



TOPICS OF THE DAY I 



ORCHESTRA 



Matinees— 25c to 75c Evenings — 25c to $1 
(Except Saturdays, Sunclajs and Holidays! 
MA'l'iNEK DAILY— Phone Douglas 70 
DO NOT PATRONIZE TICKET SOALPEKS 

ALCAZAR 

THIS WEEK ONLY— MASTER MYSTERY 

"THE CRIMSON ALIBI" 

WEEK COMMENCING SUN. MAT. AUG. 15 

Jesse Lynch Williams' Brilliant Satirical Comedy 

as Played by Nat C. Goodwin 

"WHY MARRY" 

An exposition of Marriage for Convenience and 

Get-Re!ief-Quick Divorce 

NEW ALCAZAR COMPANY 

DUDLEY AYRES— INEZ RAGAN 

SUNDAY MAT. AUG. 22— Request Revival 

To Accommodate Thousands Recently Away on 

Vacation or Unable to Secure Seats 

"PEG O' MY HEART'" 

SOON— David Belasco's "DADDIES" 

Every Evening. — Matinees Sun., Thurs., Sat. 

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE 
STATE OF CALIFORNIA, IN AND FOR 
THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN 
FRANCISCO. 
In the Matter of the Application of SOUTHER 
FREIGHT HANDLING AND STEVF.DOR- 
DOR1NG COMPANY for a change of its 
Corporate Name lo SOUTHER WARE- 
HOUSE COMPANY. No. 108448. Dept. 16. 
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE WHS AP- 
PLICATION FOR CHANGE OF NAME 
SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED. 

Souther F reighl Handling and Stevedoring Com- 
pany, the said corporation, and Kenneth Monteagle 
and A. T. Gibson, a majority of the Directors 
thereof, having Bled ;»nd presented an application 
that the name of said Souther Freight I landling and 
Stevedoring Company be changed t<. Si 
house Company. 

IT IS HEREBY ORDI RED that all r 
interested in said matter appear before tiie Superioi 
Court of the State of California in and for the City 
and County of San I ranciico, Department 1(» 
thereof, at the City Hall, No. 400 Van Ness 
Avenue, in said City and County on Monday the 
H)th day of August, 1920. at the hour ol 10 
o'clock A. M.. or as soon thereafter as counsel can 
he heard, to show cause why such applicaln 
change of name should not he granted- 

AND IT IS FURTHER ORDEREO that 

notice of said application and of this order be given 
'licalion of a copy of this order in The San 
Francisco News Letter, a newspaper of general 
circulation, printed and published in the said City 
and County of San Francisco. State of California, 
once a week for four successive weeks before said 
hearing. 

Dated this 22d dav of lulv. ' 

BERNARD I FLOOD. 
Judge of the Superior Court 

ENDORSED 

Filed lulv 22, I 

H 1 Ml I CRI VY. Clerk. 
Hv L I. WELCH, Depulv Clerk. 

MOM I AGI I & RIXIORD. 

Alton 'cant. 

14 Montgomery Stieet. S.m I i . 



Orpheum attraction slated to open Sunday 
afternoon. 

Ihirly tiny men and women, twenty ponies, 
three midget elephants, fifteen hunting dogs, 
numerous other animals and three carloads 
of scenic and electrical effects, are now in- 
cluded in Singer's Midgets' newest vaudeville 
presentation. 

Every variety of entertainment from the 
wild west ring to the fashion forum will be 
delineated by these remarkable vest pocket 
personages, it is declared. As artists, they 
qualify, regardless of their minuteness, which 
actually adds a refreshing air of novelty to 
their performances. 

An interesting bill accompanies the mid- 
gets. Georgia Campbell and the team, Dooley 
and Storey, both of this week, further aug- 
ment the approaching Orpheum offering. 

Newcomers will be Raymond Wylie and 
company, in "The Futuristic Jail-Bird"; Roy 
La Pearl, the noted aerialist with his com- 
pany; "Sassy" Lillian Gonne and Bert 
Albert, depicting old time school days; 
Misses Shaw and Campbell in an artistic 
musical act; and Willa and Harold Browne, 
who create "rag pictures" of extreme beauty 
from stray bits of cloth. Topics of the Day 
and Orpheum Orchestra are standard 
features, always found at the Orpheum. 



will receive something more than the "once 
over," and the prices are moderate. 



TECHAU TAVERN A CONTINUOUS 
ROUND OF FEATURES 

Techau Tavern at any time is feature time. 
Commencing with the popular luncheon 
served daily between 12 and 2. with tea 
during the afternoon, and then commencing 
at dinner the attractive jazz and symphony 
renditions of the Tcr.hau Ta.em dance 
orchestra ideally suited for dancing, and con- 
tinuing along to supper time the dancing 
pleasantly intermingling with numbers by the 
New Ait Revue and Ballet in a colorful 
offering of the lateal in the season's song and 

hits, all without e 

dull moment. After the theatre every dame 
iicky dance, with Hilson's orders and 
Melachrino cigarette* For the winning gentle- 
men. Saturday afternoons is generally a 
gala affair full ol life and music, for dancing 
draws it> devotees durim; the tea hour, from 
2:30 to 5:00. An added attraction is the 
free distribution of petite boxes of "Duval's 

Rouge." one ol those delicate crea- 
tions of the artist perfumer which is in great 
demand by those who desire always the 

a dull moment might well be applied 
function at the Techau Tavern. 



— There are many garages in town and the 
motorist is often in a quandary as to where 
to go. especially for permanent service 
There arc very few who give you the quality 
of service of Do-- on Taylor street, 

between O'Farrell and Geary. Here your car 











EVERYWOMAN'S 
STORE 

Consistent standards of excel- 
lence in style and quality, 
combined with great range in 
price, have gained the en- 
thusiastic patronage of all 
clever women who know 
Willard's. 

Willard's 

139-153 Geary Street 










E. F. HUTTON & GO. 

MEMBERS 

New York Stock Exchange 

490 California St. and St. Francis Hofel 
Branch: Del Monte Hotel 

Private Wires 
Coast to Coast 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIALTY 
ness Luncheon p m, 

548 Sacramento St., cor. Leidtsdorff 



Old Hampshire Bond 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

Hie Standard Paper for Business Stationery. 

"Made a little better than seems necessary." The 

riler papers ar<- tola in attractive and durable 

containing five hundred perfect sheets, plain 

or marginal ruled. The manuscript covers are sold 

in similar boxes containing one hundred sheets. 

Order through your printer or stationer, or. if so de- 

e will send a sample book showing the entire 

linr. 

BLAKE, M0FFIT & TGWNE 

Ertiblnhed IHSS 
>7 41 FIRST STRf.l T SAN FRANC IS< <i 



U. S. GARAGE 

750 Bush St. Phone Garfield 713 



PEARSON GARAGE 

345 Bush St. Phone Douglas 2120 

Repair Shop and Annex 350 Bush St. 



Largest and Most Complete Garages in 
the VI 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 14, 1920 



The Motorists 



"That big oaks from little acorns grow," 
is a trite phrase often quoted, but one of the 
examples of this in commercial life, is found 
in this city, when one recalls the early days 
of the automobile, and the now popular Ford 
first made its appearance in California. 

Seventeen years ago William L. Hughson, 
head of the large automotive distributing 
concern bearing his name, placed his order 
with Henry Ford, for the first carload of 
Ford cars for California, and which it was 
hoped would be sold in the territory that 
Hughson had as a distributor, namely Cali- 
fornia, Nevada and the Hawaiian Islands. 

From this humble beginning of a carload 
of Ford cars, has risen one of the largest and 
oldest automotive concerns operating on the 
Pacific Coast, operating branches where the 
Ford car is handled, at San Francisco, Los 
Angeles, Oakland, San Diego and Portland. 

Considered that oldest automobile concern 
in continuous operation, it has become a big 
factor in the distribution of automotive 
products. 

This organization likewise distributes the 
Fordson tractor throughout California, to- 
gether with the innumerable power farming 
machinery equipment designed exclusively 
for the Fordson. 

Headed by William L. Hughson, who has 
the reputation of being the best known 
western automobile man in the East, this 
company had its inception in 1903, being 
known during that period as the Holle Auto- 
mobile company. In 1904, when Henry Ford 
started to build the universal car, the agency 
was secured for it, and in spite of changes in 
other lines, it has been handled continuously 
ever since, a period of seventeen years, 
making of this company one of the oldest 
dealers handling the Ford car today, in the 
country. 

In 1906 the Standard Motor Car company, 
with a capitalization of $200,000, was incor- 
porated. In 1910 when Federal Motor Truck 
manufacture was started, the agency was se- 
cured by the Standard Motor Car company 
and has been handled continuously ever since 
that time. 

At about this time a branch was opened in 
Los Angeles, also one in Oakland. 

The Stoddard-Dayton line was handled in 
1911, 1912 and 1913, until financial reverses 
made it necessary for the Stoddard-Dayton 
company to discontinue manufacturing. In 
1913 arrangements were made to handle the 
product of the Kissel Motor Car company. 
The tremendous growth of business at this 
time necessitated an increased capitalization, 
so that a new company known as the Pacific 
Kissel Kar branch, with a capitalization of 



$500,000 was formed. In 1915 a branch 
was opened in San Diego, a little later in the 
same year a branch was opened in Portland. 
In 1917 the Seattle branch was established. 
For obvious reasons a change in name in 
June 1918, was made, the company then 
being known as the William L. Hughson 
company and still is. This did not disturb 
the personnel, being a change in the name 
only, the owners of the business remaining 
the same as the original organizers of 1903. 

The total business done by the company 
the first year was in the neighborhood of 
$35,000; the total business done during the 
year ending September 30, 1919, was be- 
tween four and five million dollars. The 
figures available for the 1920 fiscal year indi- 
cate that this high mark will be far outdis- 
tanced. 

Ever since the inception of the company it 
has been the aim of William L. Hughson to 
put it on the same substantial basis enjoyed 
by companies in other successful lines of 
business. This was no easy task when it is 
remembered that the automobile business is 
only about sixteen years old. During the 
early progress of this industry there were a 
few men that had the foresight to realize the 
tremendous possibilities ahead of them. 

Pioneers among these were William L. 
Hughson and Geo. W. Emmons, the owners 
of this organization. They brought with 
them not only the years of experience gained 
in other lines of business, but also the de- 
termination to conduct the automobile busi- 
ness, and apply to it the high ideals they had 
set for their goal in their former lines of en- 
deavor. These two veterans of the automo- 
bile business have adhered to certain charac- 
teristics that have made for progress and 
prosperity, and which are considered essen- 
tially good for any business. Prominent 
among these is service to the public, not 
necessarily free service, but good, prompt 
and efficient service. Price maintainance is 
another and important consideration. 

These two things coupled with a vigorous 
advertising policy and sales effort and a pro- 
gressive attitude when new and up to date 
features and appliances were considered, 
have placed this company at the head of the 
coast automobile and motor truck selling or- 
ganizations. 

Conservative financing and working in 
close touch and harmony with banking con- 
nections, which the best in every city where 
the company has located its branches, has 
enabled it even in periods of stress ana 
financial discomfort, to finance large stocks 
of goods where stocking up was deemed 
advisable. 



During the past year the company has put 
into effect a better business policy between 
the organization and its men, by .permitting 
each department to earn the monthly bonus, 
the size of which is dependent upon the 
workings of each individual department. The 
members of the organization, through the 
adoption of this plan, electing their own rep- 
resentatives who form the policies upon 
which to a great extent, the operation of the 
organization is guided. For five previous 
years an annual bonus to employees was in 
effect, but the plan recently established has 
proven so meritorious that many organiza- 
tions have followed in the footsteps of the 
Hughson organization, by installing a similar 
plan. 

It is also a well defined rule of this organi- 
zation to fill the jobs higher up with men 
from their own ranks, and not to go outside 
the organization to find men to fill these 
positions. An example of this can be found 
in the fact that each one at the heads of de- 
partments at the home office, as well as all 
of the managers at the various branches, are 
men who have risen from subordinate posi- 
tions in the organizations. 

These are some of the outstanding features 
which have made of this organization such a 
successful one. Its policies of conducting 
business, rigidly adhered to, stand out as an 
example for younger concerns to follow. 

Much of the credit, however, must be 
given to its directing head, William L. 
Hughson, for the leading position he has 
taken in all activities relating to the better- 
ment of the automobile industry in general, 
for aside from being president of the Motor 
Car Dealers' Association of San Francisco, 
one of the strongest organizations of its kind 
in the country, he has on many occasions 
been delegated by the authorities of the city 
and State to act as chairman of important 
committees and other activities of civic and 
governmental nature. 



Quality 

TIRE SHOP 

Expert Tire and 
Tube Repairers 

Q uality Retreading 



MARSHALL SQUARE 
VULCANIZING GO. 

10 Marshall Square 

Hi* SI. dtll MlrkM 
Phone Market 3837 



August 14, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 




Oakland Branch 




William L.Hughson, President 



'ami' 





Los Angeles Branch 




Home OJhct — San Francisco 




San Diego I ■ 



Portland 



Coastwise Automotive Distributors 
Established 1903 

BRANCHES: SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND LOS ANGELES SAN DIEGO ■ PORTLAND 



William L. Hughson Co. - 



18 

CELEBRATION ON OAKLAND'S 
WATER FRONT 

It was a gala day for Oakland, last Tues- 
day, the event being the formal opening of 
the Parr Terminal, which took place in the 
presence of 1 500 spectators, while among the 
speakers were the governor and several of 
the mayors of the bay communities. 

Ihe festivities opened with the arrival of 
a special train from Fourteenth and Franklin 
streets, bearing the invited guests. Ihe pro- 
gram included a trip of inspection of the 
terminal, its great warehouse and the rail 
lines approaching it; a luncheon served in 
the warehouse, the first of many to be 
erected, music and a series of speeches. 

Governor Stephens was escorted to the 
Terminal by Fred D. Parr, an old friend, and 
struck the light note in his speech, when he 
emphasized the necessity for ship facilities 
in this State, and especially in the region ol 
San Francisco Bay, while Mayor John L. 
Davie of Oakland, declared the occasion to 
be one of the most important in the history 
of Oakland. 

This new property, just completed and 
rcrdy for business, has 2008 feet of water 
Front, with sufficient sea wall for the locking 
of three 10.000 ton ships simultaneously. 

three transcontinental railroads, as well as 
the Sacramento and San Francisco electric 
lines, can operate directly to the wharf, 
there are 60,000 square feet of warehouse 
space, in the new buildings, which are all 
well equipped in the most modern manner. 

Edwrrd Rainey, secretary to the mayor of 
San Francisco, represented the mayor and 
emphasized the hand-across-the-bay policy 
which must be adopted by Oakland and her 
neighbors if this region is to become one of 
the great shipping regions of the world. 

Among the special guests who sat at the 
speakers' table were: Governor Willir.m D. 
Stephens, Congressman J. A. Elston, Mayor 
John L. Davie of Oakland, Mayor Frank 
Otis, Alameda; Max J. Kuhl end George C. 
Boardman of the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce, A. S. Levison, H. C. Capwcll, 
Edward Rainey, J. K. Know-land. W. W. 
Chapin, J. H. McCallum, president of the 
Harbor board, and Commissioners F. F. 
Morse ; nd W. H. Edwards. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 14, 1920 



Gcimany is buying hemp in large quanti- 
ties. If we were the ex-Kaiser we wouldn't 
go back home just now. — Charleston News 
and Courier. 



It has been judicially declared that woolen 
cloth is not clothing, which is as simple as the 
fact that very little clothing is woolen clolh. 
— Philadelphia Press. 



Weddinsr Presents: The chnirps' va-iety 
to select from pt Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell streets. 



SUNSHINE SERVICE CO. 

HIGHWAY AND 12TH AVE., SAN MATEO. 
Auto repairing, painting, top and curtain work, and upholstering. A full and com- 
plete line of automobile accessories at city prices. All our work guaranteed. Day and 
night sen ice. All work done by competent mechanics. Give us a trial and be convinced. 
Distributors and service for Exide batteries. Phone San Mateo 33. 




Fig; Packing Demonstration 

Mrs. Fred Hansen has installed a miniature packing planl in nur s?:r:, where she is demonstrating lo 
the public the modern methods and sanitary conditions under which 

SIERRA BRAND FIGS AND RAISINS Are Packed 

This special event should not be overlooked by anyone. 

Special prices on all of Mrs. Hansen's packs during this demonstration. 

Now at GOLDBERG, BOWEN & COMPANY, Grocers, 242 Sutter St. 



CLIN 1 ON CArE 1 LR1A Opposite Orpheum Theater 

Continuous Serving from 7 A. M. lo 8 P. M. — Music. Lunch and Dinner Orchestral and Vocal 



Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 



CAPITAL $3,000,000 
FIRE 



AUTOMOBILE 



ASSETS $22,500,000 
MARINE 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Co. in America" 

FIRE AUTOMOBILE WINDSTORM 



TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



REASONABLE RATES 



Graney's Billiard Parlor 



Finest in the World 
Perfect Ventilation 
924 Market Street 
61 Eddy Street 



EDDIE GRANEY, Proprietor 



We Casa del Rey 

is a million dollar fire-proof hotel, on 
the sunny bathing beach at Santa 
Cruz. It offers the advantages of 
tennis, golf, motoring, fishing and 
swimming, and is the center of Santa 
Cruz social life. 

MORRIS & WARNER, Props. 



H@ft@H Site Mfflttttla©w 



217 Second Avenue, San Mateo 
SPECIAL SUNDAY DINNER $1.00 
MEALS A LA CARTE 

Special attention paid to banquets, automobile 
parties and tourists. The only first-class a la 
carte restaurant in San Mateo. The hotel is 
entirely new; hot and cold water in every room. 
All well lighted. Rooms with private bath. 
Prices moderate. Summer rates given. Elevator 
service. 



EPPLER'S 

BAKERY and LUNCH 

886 Geary Street 



Branch Confectionery 
SUTTER and POWELL STREETS 

Phone Douglas 1912 



The Cecil Hotel 

of San Francisco offers 
the perfect combination 
of home and hotel life. 
Cuisine excellent. Lux- 
ury of billiard, card and 
reading rooms. 

Mrs. O. E. MORRIS. Proprietor. 



J. B. Pou J. Bergez C. Lalanne 

L. Coutard C. Mailhebuau 

BERGEZ-FRANkS 

Old POODLE-DOG Co. 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

Mujic and Entertainment Every F.\ening 
415-421 Bush St.. San Francisco 

(Above Kearny) 1 \. hj»ngr. Doug. 2411 



MY LONELY ONE 

Even as a hawk's in the large heaven's 

hollow 
Are the great ways and gracious of your 

love. 
No lesser heart or wearier wing may follow 
In those broad gyres where you rest and 

move. 

Most merciless, most high, most proud, most 

lonely — 
In the clear space between the sky and sea 
Wheel her huge orbits where the seawinds 

only 
Wander the sun-roads of Immensity. 
Yet have I known your heart and of what 

fashion 
Your love, how great, how hardly to be 

borne — 
Vour tenderness, too perfect for compassion, 
Your strength divine, too pure and proud for 

scorn. 
You are most beautiful; tho it is given 
But few to find you, fewer still to keep 
Your high path through the solitude of 

heaven, 
My lonely one, your watch upon the Deep. 
Now toward the gold glow of the sunset's 

splendor 
Veer your great vans — what haven in the 

west 
Now draws you — while the mellowing light 

makes tender 
Your dripping plumes — what islands of the 

blest? 
Lift me. Oh. lift me up to you forever. 
Beautiful Terror! Let your sacred might 
Stoop to me here and save — Oh, let me 

never 
Sink from you now to share a lesser flight! 
Even as I pray my wings of longing fail me. 
And my heart flags. In solitude you move 
Down the night's shore: not praying shall 

avail me 
To lift me. fallen from your faultless love. 
|oHN H vi i Whifi.ock in Literal? Digest. 



OH, MISTER YESTERDAY! 

When I was a kid, on a fresh Spring day. 
I useta go at sun-up to gel the smell o' May: 
And say! The waves o' perfumes that they 

would always be! 
All the flowers in the world, so it look to me, 
W.i- mixed with the good o' fresh-dug 

groun' — 
The kind o' smell that God His self would 

like to have aroun'. 
I couldn't find the smell o' the Spring today. 
Somethin' is happened — took it clean away. 
The same kinda apple-blooms was shinin' on 

the tree — 
I guess it ain't the Spring changed — it must 

be me. 
Take my money — take my house — every 

single thing — 
Oh. Mister Yesterday! — Let me smell the 

Spring! 

From "Smart Set." 



AUTOMOBILE STARTING AND 
LIGHTING SYSTEMS 

Give satisfactory results when given proper at- 
tention. We specialize on Electrical equipment, 
storage batteries, etc:, and guarantee satisfaction. 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

Brand & Cushman 
955 Post St. Phone Prospect 741 



AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE 
EXCLUSIVELY 

Union Indemnity Exchange 

of California 

Better Rates Quicker Service 

American National Bank Building 
Telephone Sutter 2645— Sutter 2646 



Want a Better Position? 

Bell Syllabic Shorthand in Six Weeks. 

Bell Touch Typewriting in Six Weeks. 

Our Complete Stenographic or "Dictaphone" 
Course in about Two Months. 

If you wish to prepare in ONE-FOURTH 
the time and at ONE-FOURTH the cost, EN- 
ROLL NOW. 

One of our courses makes an ideal Holiday 
for the wife, son or daughter, and PROTECTS 
Tl II. IR future for all lime. Individual instruc- 
tion. Day and Evening. 

Investigation costs you nothing, and may save 
regret. 

THE SYLLABIC INSTITUTE 
"The 6 Weeks' Business School." 

(Douglas 4316) 

CALIF. 



17(i Sutler Street. 
SAN FRANCISCO, 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

INSURANCE BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 




N W CORNEA 

POLK avo POST STS. 



Painted fur American Chide Comttanv l» C. Coin Phillips. Cowrivhl t<)2n 




toetttttztt* 



SATURDAY, AUGUST 21, 1920 



(T 



Autumn 

California's 
High S 



lerra 



=^ 



Air that invigorates 

Balmy days, coolest of nights and mornings 
Surroundings of wildest grandeur 
Finest of sport and outdoor life 

Yosemite 

Lake Tahoe 

Sequoia and Gen. Grant Parks — 

Kings and Kern Rivers Canyons 

Huntington Lake — 

Shasta Region 

Comfortable Hotels— Well Equipped Camps 
Trail Riding— Mountain Climbing— Fishing— Hunting 

Reduced round trip season lickeb on sale daily. Still lower round trip fares Friday and Saturdays — return limit 

fifteen days. 

For illustrated folder, "Outdoor Life in the Sierras," or "Outing Resorts" booklet, write Chas. S. Fee, Pais. Traf. M?r. 

65 Market St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Southern Pacific Lines 



^= 



J> 



Telephone Sutter 6654 



Importers 



GEO. W, GASWELL GO, 

COFFEE AND TEA 
Sp!ces._ Bafciw; Powder, Flavoring 
'■'j Extracts 
442-452 iSecond Street, San .Francisco 



For l!iat stubborn cough 
Use Old Snake Doctor's Cough Remedy 

SNAKE DRUG CO. 

Formerly G. Leipnitz & Co. 

Now Located at 

127-129 KEARNY ST. 



MacRORiE - McLaren co. 

FLORISTS. NURSERYMEN 
and 

LANDSCAPE ENGINEERS 

141 Powell Street, San Francisco 

Nurseries: San Mateo 

Phone San Mateo 1002 

Phone Douglas 4946 and Palace Hotel 



A. \V. BEST 



ALICE BEST 



BEST'S 

ART SCHOOL 

1625 California Street 

Lite Classes — Day and Night 

Illustrating Sketching Painting 



TIRES VULCANIZING 

THOMAS H. ELKINGTON 

Distributor for 

Kelly-Springfield Tires 

Long Mileage Tires and Second Hand Tires 

865 POST ST.. Near Hyde 

Phone PROSPECT 1566 




FIREPROOF 

STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1636 Market St. 

Bet. Franklin and Gough 
Tel. Park 271 San Francisco 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of Pro- 
prietors 



$ 23.828.500.00 
16.375.000.00 



If Assets. 30lh 
Sept. 1919 




$377,721,211.00 



SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E., General Manager 

351 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian Slates. New Zealand. Fiji, Papua (New 

Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australian Banking 

Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

Flead Office: London Office: 

GEORGE STREET. SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET. E. C. 2 

Agents: 
Bank of California. National Assn., Anglo cv London -Paris Nat'l Bank. Crocker Nat'l Bank 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO. CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 

STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and at LONDON. ENG.: NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND. ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.: MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Manager W. J. COULTHARD. Assistant Manager 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 California St.. San Francico, Cal. 
Member of the Federal Reserve System 
Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement and 7th Avenue 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30. 1920 

Assets $66,840,376.95 Capital Actually Paid Up $ 1.000.000.00 

Deposits 63,352.269.17 Reserve and Contingent Funds 2.488.107.78 

Employees' Pension Fund $330,951.36 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK. President 

GEO. TOURNY. Vice-Pro. and Manage. A. H. R. SCHMIDT. Vice-Pres. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE. Vice-President A. H. MULLER. Secretary 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE. Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN. Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL. Assistant Cashier 

G. A. BELCHER. Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN. Assistant Cashier 

C \Y I-IEYER. Manager Mission Branch W. C. HEYER. Manager Park-Presidio Dist. Branch 

O. F. PAULSEN. Manager Haight Slreel Branch 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JOHN A. BUCK E. T. KRUSE I. N. WALTER A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY A. H. R. SCHMIDT HUGH GOODFELLOW E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. A. CHRISTENSON ROBERT DOLLAR L. S. SHERMAN 

GOODFELLOW, EELLS. MOORE & ORRICK. General Attorneys 



THE ANGLO & LONDON PARIS NATIONAL BANK 

BOND DEPARTMENT 
Recommends the purchase of Sutter Basin Company Bonds. 

The Security is exceptional — a firSl mortgage on 55.000 acres of the famous Sacramento 
D '!ta. every acre under profitable cultivation; and the Unconditional Guarantee of 
Mr. J. Ogden Armour of Chicago, endorsed on the back ot every bond. 
8 Per Cent. Interest 
The Term of the loan will suit every requirement. One may invest for any length of lime 

Irom three years lo nine years. 
The Amount may be $100. which will return $8.00 a year; $500. which will return $40.00 
a year; or $1,000, which will return $80.00 a year. 

Complete information on request. Phone, write or call. 

Sutter and Sansome Streets Phone Kearny 5600 

San Francisco. California 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856. 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. XCVIII. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., SATURDAY, AUGUST 21, 1920 



No. 7 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA AD- 
VERTISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 259 Minna Street, near Fourth, San Francisco, Cal. Telephone 
Kearny 720. Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-Oflice as second-class mail 
matter. 

London Office — George Street & Company, 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) — I year, $2.50. Foreign: I year $5. 
Canada: I year, $3.50. 

Wouldn't you think that Europe had had enough Wrangeling 

to last her for awhile? 



We wonder (to go back to ancient history), if taking away 

their "vodka" didn't have something to do with the general uprising 
in Russia? 



"Warsaw has fallen ! " announce the newspapers with huge 

black headlines. We remember vaguely that we read that several 
days ago; but perhaps she has stood up again in the meantime. 



Besides the criminal waste involved in pouring good liquor 

down the sewers all over the United States (which eventually flows 
into bays or rivers), just think, you long-haired reformers, what a 
demoralizing effect it will have on the poor little fish! 



In a clever editorial in "Life." our two candidates for the 

presidency of the United States are described as "two highly polished, 
hard-shelled 'buck-eyes'." And under this shell, there are thoughts 
and ambitions, and schemes, about which we know nothing! 



The meeting of the S. P. C. A. which was held last Monday 

at the Society headquarters, makes us wish we could have been 
there, to put in a petition for their services in removing stray cats 
and dogs from the city streets. We should especially like to see 
vagrant cats wiped off the earth, and so relieve us of their unwelcome 
nightly serenades. 



The Bug river seems to be the only appropriately named 

section of Russia, — or Poland! 



The Western Union Telegraph Company has set a good 

example in its profit participation plan, which was recently adopted, 
the first bonus being paid last Saturday to 700 employes. If more 
firms and corporations followed it. there would be less strikes ui.l 
complications among the working classes. In fact under this plan, 
unions would soon be discarded as unnecessary. 



It is criminal negligence on the part of the police department 

of San Francisco, not to have traffic cops stationed at the various 
crossings on Mission street, in the congested down-town district. 
Most of the heavy traffic is done on this thoroughfare which is 
often so crowded that it takes unusual nimbleness in the bewildered 
pedestrian to dodge cars, trucks, wagons and autos. 



When we realized that most of the human hair which is 

shipped to the United States from China, is cut from the heads of 
the deceased, who have been the victims of all sorts of hideous 
illnesses, we shudder at the thought of perhaps wearing this "false 
hair" on our own heads. The unfortunates who must wear false 
hair should purchase it at reputable stores, and be sure of its origin. 



The three proposed amendments to the city charter, which 

give the Board of Supervisors control over the Board of Public 
Works, and Board of Health, and over the salary question of 
municipal employees, is. in our opinion, a very much delayed ^and 
very badly wanted jurisdiction. If these different boards are a "law 
unto themselves" as regards the expenditure of their budget appro- 
priations, and can increase the pay of their different officials over 
the veto of the Board of Supervisors, we wonder why the latter 
have been called "supervisors." when there is apparently nothing 
left to supervise! 



Lloyd George is taking Mannix at his word, in not allowing 

the archbishop to visit his native land, but permitting his mother to 
visit him in England. Mannix has stated that he wished to visit 
Ireland to see his mother after many years' absence, -and not for 
political purposes. Well, if we can't take the word of an 'archbishop, 
whose can we rely upon? 



That the accountant fraud is becoming a scandal is shown by 

the charges brought against the Institute of Chartered Accountants, 
a newly-incorporated private organization in this State, by the State 
Board of Accountants. The latter claims that members of this 
Institute are trading on the reputations of the members of the State 
Board, and that it is illegal for an accountant to designate himself 
as "chartered" unless he is the holder of a certificate issued by the 
State Board, and this can only be obtained by the proper 
examination. 



The age limit (from 2 to 4), of the children allowed free of 

charge in the kindergarten established at the old Green street 
Congregational church, for the benefit of working mothers in the 
North Beach district, who have no one with whom to leave their 
children, is certainly a very narrow one. and causes us to wonder 
what the poor women with children under two years, or over four, 
are going to do with them? 



We wonder if any other city in the world but San Francisco 

would allow a property like that lying along the Marina, to degen- 
erate into the condition which this strip of land into} 
It may be argued that it is under private ownership, but if so. why 
did the city allow it to slio from its possession into such indifferent 
or greedy hands? The site of the "World's Fair" in Chicago has 
been made into a fine park: San Diego's exposition grounds are a 
thing of beauty; only Sa» Francisco is guilty of letting such an 
eye-sore endure! 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 21, 1920 



Editorial 



San Francisco has some of the dirtiest streets in the 
The Filth of United States, if not in the world, and what makes 
San Francisco this condition more inexcusable, is the fact that it 
should be an extremely easy city to keep clean and 
healthful. In the first place, we do not have to contend with the 
volumes of smoke and soot, coming from hundreds of factories such 
as the eastern cities are cursed with ; in the second place, we could 
devise a way of using the ocean water to wash streets and sidewalks 
with (salt water is a mild disinfectant) ; and thirdly, we are blessed 
with an equable climate, thus making street cleaning an easy matter 
every day in the year. Also, the automobile has replaced the horse 
to such an extent that the only dirt from street traffic is an overflow 
of oil, which cannot be looked upon as a detriment. In fact, our 
southern cities keep the dust from flying by "watering" their high- 
ways with petroleum. 

Under these propitious circumstances, why do we patient inhabi- 
tants of San Francisco endure the existing filthy conditions of our 
streets and sidewalks? Certain districts are kept comparatively 
clean; the Western Addition doesn't reek with dirt; Presidio Terrace, 
the residence tracts south of Twin Peaks are as clean as country 
lanes; why should some parts of our city be so neglected? Why 
should empty lots be made into dumpgrounds? Why should fearful 
odors from the gutters assail our nostrils in a city swept by sweet 
ocean breezes and cleansed with fragment fogs? When nature has 
given us every advantage to work with, and we have failed to avail 
ourselves of these benefits; when conditions are so favorable that 
half our labor is accomplished before we begin, and still we neglect 
to further it. then the only conclusion to be drawn is, that as a city, 
we have no civic pride, and that our Board of Public Works abso- 
lutely fails to do its duty. 

Poor, persecuted, prosecuted, maligned Eugene Schmitz, with all 
the crimes of preceding and succeeding mayors heaped upon his 
shoulders, at least put the Board of Public Works to use occasionally, 
and kept our city clean literally, if not metaphorically. But the 
conditions of San Francisco's streets today are a disgrace to any 
city under the sun, and no better could be said of them, for the 
last ten years. 

The Civic Center is a dream come true, and we are proud of its 
promotion and accomplishment, but we can show the present admin- 
istration such squalor, such filth, such neglect, such rubbish-filled 
"vacant" lots, such unprintable offal, in some of our highways and 
byways, that the beauty of all the "Civic Centers" in the world could 
not sweeten these dirty spots! 



The stand of Samuel M. Shortridge, Repub- 
Shortridge Emulates lican candidate for United States senator, 
Washington against the League of Nations, preaching the 

doctrine of Washington and Americanism and 
opposing entangling alliances, is winning him commendation and 
support in all parts of the State. Many messages of congratulation 
were received by Shortridge following a recent address before the 
Rotary Club of Sacramento in which he said: 

"However much we may love mankind, I exalt 
America — I enthrone Americans above all other people, 
that we may perpetuate this Government to our children. 
I am, therefore, in favor of America and Americans, and 
am against, as I have been since its inception at Paris, the 
Wilson League of Nations. 

"There was once a great man and his name was 
George Washington. Taking it from Washington down 



to our present day, America should not imperil her destiny 
by tying herself up with Asiatic or European nations. You 
may say I am narrow, but I will say that the policy of the 
" American Government is one hundred years old and should 
not be abandoned. It was started with a small nation on 
the Atlantic and has spread from Plymouth Rock to the 
Golden Gate. 

"Let us remember the history of this country — the 
dangers we have avoided — and now standing here as an 
example for all the world. One hundred and forty-four 
years ago our fathers put forth their Declaration of 
Independence. Their declaration should be, must be our 
declaration. We should not, we must not surrender our 
independence or imperil our destiny by European or Asiatic 
alliances, such as the Smuts-Wilson League of Nations." 

The following are a few solid facts which show why Samuel 
Shortridge's campaign is meeting with the endorsement of the 
majority of the clubs, and organizations, and the rank and file of 
California: 

Samuel M. Shortridge has been given unsolicited more editorial 
support from the California press than all of his opponents com- 
bined. Indorsements of Shortridge are sweeping the State. 
Shortridge could stay in his law office attending to his personal 
business and still be nominated and elected. 

Ne\er before has there been such a popular demand for a candi- 
date for the United States Senate as there is this year for Samuel 
M. Shortridge. The many years of unselfish, loyal efforts of 
Shortridge for public betterment and for the success of Republican 
ideals will be rewarded. 

Samuel M. Shortridge is one of California's best known citizens, 
both in the State and out of it. He will bring credit to California. 
He will be California's advocate and champion. A place of leader- 
ship in the upper branch of Congress awaits him. 

Samuel M. Shortridge, Republican candidate for United States 
senator, represents the true Americanism as opposed to inter- 
nationalism. He stands for the full right and privileges of American 
citizenship, for the welfare of American business and for the 
protection of American labor. 

Samuel M. Shortridge deserves much of the Republican party 
and he will make a great senator in the National Capital. His 
candidacy on the Republican ticket, ardently supporting the Repub- 
lican National ticket is meeting with widespread and enthusiastic 
favor in all parts of the State. He should be carried into the high 
honor by an overwhelming majority. 



"San Francisco has the most beautiful 
"Down to the Haven!" harbor in the world!" said enthusiastic 
friends once, after a prolonged visit to 
Europe, where they had visited all the great harbors. And we, who 
are devout Californians, do not doubt this. In fact, we do not want 
to doubt it. It is beautiful, wonderful, with its ocean tides sweeping 
swiftly through mountainous cliffs, and frowning headlands, and then 
spreading its arms gently out in the tawny robes of the hills, under 
the smiling blue skies. Almost land-locked, its great size affords 
unlimited sea-room, its softly sloping shores unlimited wharfage. 

During the last few years we have watched the concrete piers 
evolve, starting from China Basin, gradually past the Ferry building, 
on along the water front, under the shadow of Telegraph Hill. We 
have "sat upon the headland heights, and listened" — not to the 
"faint sobbing of the sea" — but to the regular stamp, stamp, stamp, 
of the pile driver, building new piers, that stretch out into the water, 
and take into their embrace all sorts of water craft, from the gicat, 
slow-moving, stalely Oriental liners, down to the awkward oil 
freighters. We have watched this encroachment of concrete arms 
along the Embarcadero with great pride, but we realize at the same 



August 21, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



time, that with our wonderful advantages, we should have accom- 
plished more. 

The site of our city is a natural harbor, a God-made haven; but 
smaller cities, with little or no real wharfage, have taken mighty 
strides during the years that we have been almost at a stand-still. 
In looking over shipping journals, one reads of Oakland Harbor, 
Los Angeles Harbor (twenty years ago it boasted one lonely dock, 
where little coast-wise steam schooners tied up at intervals) ; Seattle ; 
even small Tacoma, which is now aspiring to take her place as an 
important Pacific port. 

"Los Angeles Expands! " we read. (And it really has in operation 
twelve steamship lines, reaching ports in the Orient, South America, 
India, Africa, Europe). "Tacoma Improves," — she has just put 
through a "contract involving 2,000,000 cubic yards of dredging and 
filling, and 45,000 yards of rock-rip-rapping (whatever that may be, 
but it sounds hard!) Seattle intends inaugurating another steamship 
line to the Orient, in the near future; Oakland possesses miles ot 
ship-building plants, and her dockage is growing out into the bay so 
fast that it will soon meet San Francisco's, and then we won't need 
ferry boats any more; and no doubt we will some day hear that San 
Diego (whose original boast it was that she could harbor all the 
battle fleets in the world in her bay!) is second in importance as a 
shipping center on the Pacific Coast! None of these sea ports have 
the natural facilities that we have, and yet they are mentioned 
(with the exception of little Tacoma), hardly less often than are we! 

But that we have a brilliant future before us, some of the following 
facts will prove: 

The bulk of the increase in passenger traffic and commerce 
between Pacific Coast ports and the Orient, prophesied by San 
Francisco Shipping men, should be easily secured by San Francisco. 
Fifteen vessels, to be operated from Coast ports, are now under 
construction in Eastern shipyards; five of these being allotted to the 
Pacific Mail S. S. Company of this city, their sailings from San 
Francisco to be every two weeks, instead of the present monthly 
sailings. This company will establish a new and direct line from 
this Coast (we hope from San Francisco) to Vladivostok and 
Shanghai, without touching Japanese ports, a route for which an 
insistent demand has been made, due to rapidly increasing volume 
of inter-commerce between the United States and China : this route 
to be established before the end of the year. Five more of these 
vessels have been apportioned for service under the flag of the 
Admiral line of the Pacific Mail S. S. Company: and the remaining 
five to be put into commission by the Matson Navigation Company. 

A new service was instituted last fall by the Pacific Mail, between 
San Francisco and Baltimore. This line forms an important con- 
nection with its other routes, and will extend the operations of the 
Pacific Mail more than half way around the globe. 

This same enterprising company will build its own pier in Manila. 
The construction of such a pier will insure Manila's being the center 
of American shipping and commerce in the Orient. 

Direct steamship service from Pacific Coast ports to the cast coast 
ports of South America, wai inaugurated last May. the fust sailing 
on May 15th. This line is under the management of M 
Swayne & Hoyt. and the present plan is to dispatch one steamer a 
month, via the Straits of Majellan. to River Platte and return. 
Just now this service contemplates making South American east 
coast ports only, and it is expected that Pacific Coast merchants 
will find this directly advantageous to them, in the exploitation of 
South American business. 

Horacio Bossi Caceres. consul general for the Argentine in ;>an 
Francisco, has addressed a very cordial letter to San Francisco 
business men through the Chamber of Commerce, offering his 
co-operation in connection with the establishment of this service. 
Cacera has invited merchants to call on him who have goods to 
ship to the Argentine. He will be glad to accept price quotations, 
samples and a statement of conditions governing transactions, with 



the idea of placing these before the leading merchants of his own 
country. 

The consul has taken a very strong stand in favor of greater 
commercial relationship between San Francisco and the Argentine 
Republic, and it is a certainty that local business men will find his 
assistance invaluable. 

There is "now a project in Congress to create a free zone at New 
York, Baltimore, New Orleans, Seattle and San Francisco, which 
should tend toward bigger business for this port. Lest advocacy of 
the free port or zone should be misconstrued, let us say that it has 
nothing to do with a general free-trade policy. The creation of such 
a zone would give great impetus to world trade, and would in no wise 
interfere with our custom laws or with operation of a protective 
tariff. This free port or zone is made especially for the arrival and 
departure of vessels, which would bring into such a zone raw 
materials or finished products to be reconditioned, or sorted, or 
manufactured, or broken up into small parcels, and re-exported to 
other lands, or exported into the rest of the United States. The 
free port or zone is nothing new. The zone may be operated by a 
private corporation, or it may be under the control or the ownership 
of a government, or a city. It could mean only beneficial results 
for our city. 

But especially should we build up an immense Oriental trade, and 
in the opinion of Mr. Anton Woltring, of the firm of A. Culp, 
exporter, who has recently returned to this country from the East 
Indies, we should take advantage of the Dutch East Indian market, 
which the changed conditions resulting from the war, opened up 
to the United States and Japan, the Dutch East Indies having 
depended largely upon Germany for their imported goods. Mr. 
Woltring says that Japan has spoiled her chances in this market by 
delivering inferior goods, and that "Holland is too small a nation to 
furnish her colonies with enough capital and clever business men, 
so that many estates and other large concerns are in the hands of 
English, French, German, and even Japanese capitalists. With the 
exception of the Standard Oil Company, one of the largest concerns 
of the East, American capital is not much interested. 

"The Indies are open for almost all the American goods, and in 
return can export to America sugar, rubber, lea, coffee, cocoa, 
copra, quinine, and tobacco." 

Also, the Chinese boycott against Japan should gain business for 
the Pacific Coast : there is a great demand in China for yarns and 
piece-goods, and cotton mill machinery. 

The following interesting schedule of receipts between this 
country and Japan, is given by the "Baltimore Journal of 
Commerce:" 

"Japan's growing trade with America was emphasized by figures 
made public January 9th by the Treasury Department. In 1914. 
the value of merchandise we imported from Japan was $107.- 
355.897; in 1915 it was $98,882,638: 1916. $147,644,228; 1917. 
$208,127,478: 1918. $284,945,439: 1919. $303,993,041. 

"The principal items in 1919 were: Raw silk. $137,157,405: 
tea. $13,420,037; silk fabrics. $10,939,396; and soy bean oil. 
•?8. ( W4,776. The exports of the United States to Japan totaled in 
value $326,462,269 in- 1919. being the first time the balance in 
trade was in our favor with Japan. 

Whst we have written is only a fraction of what various shipping 
publications could tell you. and. taking everything into consideration. 
do you think we are too optimistic when we prophesy great things, 
great business, great doings for San Francisco as a shipping center? 
Don't you think there are times coming that are worth living for 
awhile longer to see? Don't you feel that in the very near future. 
»c will behold a water front teeming with trans-Pacific. trans- 
Isthmian, trans-world commerce: when every inch of space along the 
Embarcadero. from China Basin to the Presidio, yes. and further.— 
past Baker's Beach, will be occupied by long stone arms, reaching 
(Continued on Pae- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 21, 1920 



Town Crier 

Hear the Crier: Who the Devil Art Thou? 

One That Will Plav the Devil, Sir, With You. 



The iridescent dreams of the benevolent assimilation of the 

Japanese, indulged by some pious people, do not commend them- 
selves to persons who know the tropics. Any experienced missionary 
will say that he would rather try to do well for any tropical stock in 
the jungles far away from contact with white people, than in the 
centers of commerce. We have civilized the Indians off the face of 
the earth. We would be in the way to do the same thing for the 
Japanese if our people could find a proper home among them. We 
cannot manage the negro problem in our own land. Yet we go to 
the ends of the earth to effect benevolent assimilation. "Vanity of 
vanities," saith the preacher. 



A correspondent writes to know whether the impulse to jump 

from any high elevation is an indication of suicidal tendencies on the 
part of the person afflicted with that emotion. The impulse to jump 
from a high building, or other great height, is not suicidal. It is 
the rag-tag and bob-tail of a condition of things when our ancestors 
had dominion over the ether and could take unto themselves wings 
and flee away — at will. It is an impulse, therefore, which savors of 
a mighty fine epoch — void of commutation tickets and street car 
fares, and when a woman could dry her week's washing in two or 
three minutes by simply taking a hop on one foot and away, trailing 
it in her wake as she mounted to the sun. My correspondent has 
nothing to fear providing he restrains the latent impulse to hop off 
into the etherial and perform an aerial stunt without the support of 
an airplane. 



-One of those conscientious people who, when discovering a 



great truth, feel it incumbent upon them to make it known for the 
benefit of their fellow creatures through the medium of the daily 
press, gravely announces that "clothes do not make the man." Of 
course clothes don't make the man, but they make all of him 
except his hands and face during business hours, and that's a 
pretty considerable area of the human animal. A dirty shirt may 
hide a pure heart, but it seldom covers a clean skin. If a man looks 
as if he had slept in his clothes, most men will jump to the con- 
clusion that he has, and he will never get to know them well enough 
to explain that his head is so full of noble thoughts that he hasn't 
time to bother with the dandruff on his shoulders. And if he wear 
blue and white and striped pants and a red necktie, he will find it 
difficult to get close enough to a deacon to be invited to say grace 
at his table, even if he never pays for anything except coffee or 
beans. 



A local paper has a letter signed "Tourist" and headed "Los 

Angeles and its Earthquake Situation." In several paragraphs of 
newsy and interesting English, this touring individual rattles along, 
making up his facts (?) as he goes and leaving the impression that 
the entire Coast is one great earthquake cradle where nature does 
the rocking and the natives sleep the sleep of innocence. This 
"Tourist" tells us that the street cars of Los Angeles "run in all 
directions." It would be more remarkable if they all ran in one 
direction. He also finds no "iron, coal nor timber" in the city limits. 
Neither could he find any orange groves, for they have been cut 
down that depots and brick buildings might be builded in their place; 
yet the orange industry cuts no small figure in the southern field. 
This young man should quit touring and go and live in the South. 
He could then grow up with the country and ascertain that the 
South is possessed of resources undreamed of by the casual visitor. 



Theatres in this city have for many years enjoyed a 

remarkable immunity from fatal accidents. But this has rather been 
I he result of extraordinary good fortune than of any special wisdom 
on the part of the management. All habitual playgoers must be 
aware that with few exceptions the means of exit at our theatres, 
in case of fire or of sudden panic among the audience resulting from 
a false alarm, are lamentably inadequate, especially when the highly 
inflammable nature of the interior fittings and scenery is taken into 
consideration. These remarks apply with particular force to many 
of our most liberally patronized places of amusement, many of 
which are literally death traps, the approaches being out of all 
proportion to the number of persons which the buildings themselves 
are capable of holding. In too many instances there is but one 
known entrance, consisting of a long narrow passage wherein dozens, 
if not hundreds of people would inevitably be crushed in the event 
of a sudden rush being made from the building. Few will deny 
that there is ample room for improvement in this respect, or that 
the public has a right to demand that some immediate reform should 
be made. 



Everybody today dependent upon the beneficence of a San 

Francisco landlord is complaining of exorbitant rents and a general 
predilection of all property owners for profiteering. Apartments that 
four years ago rented for thirty dollars by the month now command 
twice that amount and yet the cry continues, "Sleep where you make 
your money." "What are we to do?" cries the distressed and 
puzzled renter. I faintly remember a story, told by Artemus Ward, 
I think, of a man who was imprisoned for long, weary years in a 
room by himself, enduring patiently the nameless horrors of solitary 
confinement. One day, when his luckless condition of isolation and 
solitude had become insupportable, it occurred to the unhappy man 
to open the window and step out. The application of this anecdote 
to the rental situation is, I think, sufficiently obvious. There is plenty 
of room in the woods surrounding Mill Valley. The apartment 
dwellers appear to occupy the somewhat ludicrous attitude ot 
endeavoring to obtain by threats and entreaties deliverance from 
conditions that they have no disposition to resist. 



A recent court decision holds that it is not ordinarily an act 

of negligence to step on board a moving street car. Of course it is 
not negligence to board a moving car. It's a necessity. Since when 
did a Market street car come to a full stop to pick up a five-cent 
fare? The man who waits for a street car to stop for his con- 
venience must have a tolerably good opinion of himself. He must 
get on the best way he can and take his chances. Same thing if 
he wants to get off. Shall the entire system fail of its schedule 
because some part of its freight seeks delivery? What is a passenger 
that the United or Municipal Street Railway should wait for him? 
It's a great business, this of hauling live freight to and fro in the 
streets of San Francisco, and to see the way the poor abject, nervous, 
breathless devils rush to their places along about 5 o'clock, and are 
jostled and jerked and pushed hither and thither suggests that their 
inalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness are for 
the time being denied them until they, under God's providence, strike 
the sidewalk. Step lively, now! Jump, ye tarriers, jump! 



An English contemporary complains of the license accorded 

the American press and wonders greatly thereat. While it is a 
pretty general truth that where the press is free from control nobody 
is free from the press; officials and public men who are honest, 
and private citizens who keep within the circumference of their own 
affairs, are seldom assaulted, and even when they are, the assault 
falls harmless. 



It looks as if the Oakland commuters would be forced to sleep 

in the same town where they make their livings! 



August 21. 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



> w"4»-'WiWW/r^^^^ 



"Ave Caesar, We Who Are About To Die, Salute Thee" 

By Eleanore F. Lewys-Ross. 



^////////////////>7////^^^^ 



Ymrtr'/"'-----'.'-, ,- ,,,.,,,,,. ^,„„. 



The paper fell from her thin, nerveless fingers to the floor; 
presently, in a mechanical, hopeless manner, she picked it up and 
read it again. There was no heading, no date; evidently his 
stenographer had been unusually hurried — 

"Madame — I have always had the reputation of being truthful to the point of 
brusqueness, so that you, having known me all these years, will pardon my 
almost brutal frankness in your case. 

"I will give you six months more to live; that is all. Perhaps a change, a 
stay in some quiet country place, will prolong this time, but I doubt it. You 
have besought me for the truth; you must therefore forgive my manner of 
rendering it. 

"Very sincerely, 

Austin Brummell, M. D." 

Rising slowly, with the crumpled letter in her hand, the girl 
walked to the mirror and stood gazing at her reflection. 

A figure, slight almost to thinness, but with grace in every line of 
it. A thin, spiritual face, lighted up with great dark eyes and 
clustering black hair. A face of one whose mind is always conqueror 
of its body; and yet, through it all, an amused, satirical expression 
lurking behind it, as if the soul was laughing at the utter futility 
of keeping its fleshly domicile "like a holy temple" for the relentless 
ravages of dissolution in the end! 

Six months! Why, it was ridiculous! She pinched one slim arm 
hanging listlessly at her side, in a cruel spasm of anger, and it left 
a dull red mark on her delicate flesh. Moving restlessly around the 
room (her pretty room, full of dainty pieces of bric-a-brac, mostly 
Oriental, that she had bought from time to time with her hardly 
earned dollars, and all the more precious for that reason) she at last 
paused at the window, throwing it wide, and leaned out into the 
night. 

A glorious yellow moon was rising over the dark spires and house- 
tops of the city — a full, harvest moon. The wind came softly from 
the sea, caressingly, pregnant with whispered secrets of the dusk. 
It was an evening such as is sometimes grudingly bestowed upon 
us; all the more beautiful because of its rarity. But an evening that 
creates in the soul of the solitary dreamer a sudden sickening 
aversion to its self-inflicted solitude. 

From the group of urchins playing in the street came the thin 
childish chanting of some game; down the paved walk strolled a 
pair of lovers, the man speaking earnestly and low. the girl now and 
then breaking into nervous little thrills of laughter. 

All the world seemed to have found its mate; each different breed 
, of humans had paired. Why not she? Of what consequence, to 
what end, this soul-withdrawing? Did one ever meet one's ideal? 

And she had but six months more to live! Well, she would live 
them ! 



The man at her side glanced at her occasionally with the self- 
satisfied, assured look of possession that to a woman of individuality 
is like the checkrein on a restive thoroughbred. 

There were a dozen couples at the long, well-laden table, about 
as illy-matched as one could find on this mis-mated globe; and still 
apparently ludicrously unconscious of their own incongruity. The 
girl's soul laughed within her. 

Here a parrot tied to a loggy, well-fed hog: a monkey with a 
tortoise; a fat. sleek little duck with an eagle; a butterfly with a 
toad, and so on. down the vista of shining after-dinner faces. And 
the prevailing spirit of the place was merriment! 

"1 must be gay, too!" she muttered to herself. "Only a few more 
months! 1 must be gay!" 



And so she did not demur at the fourth and fifth filling of her 
glass, but smiled instead. 

And when she was called upon for a toast, she arose to the 
occasion bravely. 

Poor, slight figure, almost as thin and wan as the mummy brought 
out at Egyptian feasts ! With cheeks and lips as crimson as flaming 
pomegranate blossoms, she stood a moment silent, then raised her 
glass with a little ripple of laughter. 

"We are told to 'let the dead past bury its dead', 'the morrow take 
care of itself, and so in acquiescence with these bits of wisdom from 
lips long dead themselves, I drink to the present, the only event in 
life that we are sure of! So here's to a short life and a merry 
one." 

The door bell rang sharply, and she heard hurried footsteps on 
the stairs. A girl came in swiftly, after her preparatory knock. 

"That letter you received a few days ago from Dr. Brummell, you 
remember?" she began nervously, opening and closing the small 
handbag she carried. "It was sent to you by mistake. I was in an 
awful hurry that evening, and after the doctor had signed all his 
correspondence, I mixed up the envelopes. It should have gone to 
a patient of his who is dying of consumption. Here is the letter that 
should have reached you. I am more sorry than I can say, because 
I know that the doctor has every hope of your recovery." 

She held out the letter to the rigid figure in front of her, but her 
companion did not offer to take it. Instead, she broke into a ringing 
peal of laughter, and dropped limply onto the couch by the window. 
"You must excuse me," she at last said, brokenly. "But of course 
you can't understand how perfectly funny it is! Thank you for 
coming and telling me. though; it was very kind of you. As for the 
letters getting mixed up — " She paused for a moment, and stared 
unseeingly out at the brilliant sunshine, the sparrows importantly 
busy with their continuous nest biulding, fluttering in and out of the 
eaves in the house across the cobbled street, and then her face 
grew gray and wan; all the light died out of her amused eyes; she 
drew a little gasping breath: 

"It really does not matter," she added quietly. 



The boldest dash of criticism recently observed, is that letter 

addressed to a daily paper who trusted to the promises of Charles 
Ponzi. the "mystery financier." now enjoying the hospitality of the 
Boston jail. This betrayed innocent complains that "had not the 
public prints gone out of their way to attack this purely business 
undertaking, all contracts would have been legitimately fulfilled and 
no one would have lost a cent." I don't like to be thought "stuck 
up." I am not unsocial, and the News Letter has no desire to lose 
from the fold even the most unworthy of its subscribers, but really 
I have an aversion to fools. Possibly, because, like other nuisances, 
they are so exceedingly plentiful. The number of fools, says the 
sage, is to the number of wise men as the number of times one gets 
nothing for something is to the number of times one gets something 
for nothing. 



"Down to Haven" 
(Continued from Page 5) 
out into the sea. and taking into their embrace all sorts of water 
craft, from the slow-moving, stately, all-round-the-world liner, to the 
ungainly, into-every-port old freighter? 

San Francisco is the most beautiful port in the world! Here's 
to making it the busiest! 



8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 21, 1920 



Miss Maude O'Connor is visiting Mr. and 
Mrs. Leigh Sypher at their attractive home, 
"Gardenholm," in Santa Barbara, and is 
being extensively entertained. Mrs. Milo 
Potter entertained recently in honor of Miss 
O'Connor at a luncheon which she gave at 
El Mirasol. 

Mrs. Wendell P. Hammon and her little 
grandson have returned from Santa Barbara, 
where they have been visiting for the past 
six weeks. 

Mrs. Charles Butters and Mrs. Thomas A. 
Richard have returned from Santa Barbara, 
where they have been staying at El Mirasol. 

The William Lee Hathaway home at 
Pebble Beach has been the scene of much 
informal entertaining all summer. Last 
week-end Miss Mabel Hathaway had as her 
house guests Mr. and Mrs. John Douglas 
Short, Mr. and Mrs. George Wolfe and 
Captain Alva Conklin. 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman McLaren, formerly 
of San Francisco, who have made their home 
in Los Angeles for the past two years, have 
planned to return north to be established 
here permanently. 

Mrs. William Henry Pool of Woodside was 
luncheon hostess recently at her home follow- 
ing her return from Del Monte, where she 
and Mr. Pool passed several days. The 
guests at the luncheon included: Mesdames 
H. McDonald Spencer, Evan Williams, Harry 
N. Stetson, William Duncan, Charles Mc- 
Cormick, Bernard Ford, Edward J. Tobin, 
Latham McMullin. 

Complimenting Mr. M. H. De Young and 
his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. 
Nion Tucker, who are visiting in Seattle, 
several delightful affairs have been given 
during the past week, one of the most at- 
tractive having been the dinner at the Seattle 
Golf club on Tuesday evening, August 17, 
at which Mr. and Mrs. J. C. C. Eden were 
hosts. 

Miss Deborah and Miss Edith Pentz, two 
attractive members of the younger set of 
Marin county, were hostesses Tuesday after- 
noon at a delightful "porch" luncheon which 
they gave at their home in San Rafael. The 
affair was in honor of Miss Betsy Dibblee. 

Miss Anne Weatherbee of New York, who 
is a visitor in California, is a guest of Miss 
Lorna Williamson at the Willard F. William- 
son home on Mason street. Later in the 
season Miss Weatherbee will visit Miss Maye 
Colburn at her home in San Rafael and at 
her apartments at the Fairmont hotel. In- 
numerable affairs have been planned in 
honor of the charming visitor. 

Cornelius Vanderbilt, Jr.. son of the New 
York millionaire, has written the Bellevue 
for reservations. In his letter young Vander- 
bilt identifies himself as "special corre- 
spondent of the New York Times." He is 
due here early in September. 

Mrs. Henry Foster Dutton who has been 



visiting in the East as the guest of Mr. and 
Mrs. Thomas Fortune Ryan and other friends 
in New York has returned to California con- 
trary to her plans and has joined Mr. Dutton 
at the Webber Lake Country club. 

Mr. and Mrs. LeRoy Schlessinger, of Bur- 
lingame, will leave this Saturday for a 
tour around the world. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Judson and her 
daughter, Mrs. Frank Somers, who have 
been at the Mount Diablo Country club for 
the past few weeks, have returned to town. 

Mr. and Mrs. Winfield Scott Davis, who 
passed the early part of the summer season 
at their home in Ross valley, are touring the 
North on a several weeks' trip. On their 
return they will open their town house for the 
winter. 

Mrs. D. J. Verdenal and her daughter, 
Mrs. Blanche Verdenal of Hollywood are in 
town for a few weeks and during their visit 
will be at the Bellevue hotel. 

Mrs. John Page of Santa Barbara, who 
has been visiting in Burlingame and Tahoe 
all summer, has returned south. 

Mrs. F. S. Loop and her daughter. Miss 
Virginia Loop, who make their home at the 
Fairmont, will leave in about three weeks for 
the East, sailing soon after for Europe. 

Mr. and Mrs. James L. Laidlow and Miss 
Louise Laidlaw, who have been staying at 
the Fairmont, have left for Del Monte for a 
week's visit, having motored down. 

The youngest of the Marin county social 
world were entertained at a delightful party 
which Mrs. Edwin L. Griffith gave Monday 
afternoon at her beautiful home in Ross 
valley in honor of the birthday anniversary 
of her granddaughter. Miss Betty Griffith, 
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Millen Griffith. 

Mrs. Edward Barron and daughter. Miss 
Evelyn Barron, are at Del Monte for another 
of their long visits. They have been enter- 
tained by Mr. and Mrs. George B. Carpenter 
of Medford, Oregon. 

Tallant Tubbs is at the Arlington in Santa 
Barbara. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Lichtenberg, who have 
been at the Lichtenberg home in San Rafael 
for some time, are in town for a few days at 
the Fairmont. They plan to return to their 
ranch in northern Marin county, where they 
will entertain their daughter, Mrs. Hugh 
Porter. Mrs. Porter has been at the ranch 
"Casa Mia" for the past few weeks. 

Mrs. Leroy Linnard returned to the Fair- 
mont after a fortnight's visit at Del Monte. 

In a group who enjoyed a delightfully in- 
formal picnic on Sunday in charming Ross 
valley were: Misses Anne Peters, Constance 
Hart, Lorna Williamson; Messrs. Edward 
Maltby. Andrew Talbot, Benno Hart, Jr.; 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis Langton. 

The members of the San Francisco Yacht 
club will give a dance at the club house in 
Sausalito on Saturday evening. A number 



of yachting parties have been made up for 
Saturday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hobart and Miss 
Ruth Hobart entertained several guests over 
the week-end at their summer camp at Sand 
Harbor in Lake county. 

Miss Sara Coffin was hostess at a luncheon 
which she gave Wednesday afternoon, 
August 12, at her home in San Anselmo in 
compliment to Mrs. Toppee Thurston. 

Mrs. James Ward Keeney and Mrs. George 
Harding have returned from a visit to Mr. 
and Talbot Walker in Montecito. They 
motored north, stopping at Del Monte en 
route. 

Stephen Parrolt, who has been passing his 
summer vacation from Harvard University 
in California, has been visiting in Santa 
Barbara. Upon his return from the south, 
he will prepare to leave for Cambridge to 
re-enter college. 



"Young man. are you satisfied with your 
present position?" 

"Naw, but it's fifty-fifty. The boss isn't 
satisfied with the way I fill it, either — Pacific 
Mutual News. 



Economy 



Clever women know that the 
true test of economy is not 
"how much did you pay?" 
but rather "What value did 
you receive. It is these women 
who buy at Willard's. 



Willard' s 

The Specialty Shop of Smartness 

139-153 Geary Street 



TBa 



FOR 

Exdrasnv® 

Elftte^ininllnfil' 

Management of 
Halsey W. Manwaring 



.©antes 




August 21, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



IDEAL SUMMER DAYS BRING MANY 
FROM CITY TO DEL MONTE 

The clerk of the weather has been lavish 
with his number of perfect days at Del 
Monte. The sun shines brightly and the 
cool, sweet breeze keeps one feeling exhil- 
arated. Society folk are taking advantage 
of the wonderful August days and spending 
the hours at their favorite pastime, either 
golf, tennis, swimming or motoring. Horse- 
back riding seems to be everybody's favorite, 
for never were the ponies at Del Monte so 
much in demand. It is a recreation that has 
an appeal all it's own and at Del Monte there 
is every incentive to go for a canter along 
the beautiful bridle paths and interesting by- 
ways. 

Miss L. Robbins is an expert rider. She 
is at Del Monte with her father and mother, 
Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Robbins of Los Angeles. 

Miss Caroline Poole, young daughter of 
Colonel and Mrs. J. Hudson Poole, residing 
at Del Monte Lodge for the summer, is a 
splendid little equestrienne. 

Miss Katherine Ramsay, visiting with Mr. 
and Mrs. Chas. G. Blythe at Pebble Beach, 
the Misses Mary and Elizabeth La Boyteaux 
of New York, Miss Corinne Dillman, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Dillman of 
Sacramento, Mrs. Overton and Miss Overton 
of San Francisco, Miss Constance Uhl, 
Piedmont, Mme. de Mailley, San Francisco, 
and Miss Winifred West, are among the 
active young folk who ride every day. 

Mrs. Edward Barron and daughter. Miss 
E. Barron, are back at Del Monte for another 
of their long visits. They have been enter- 
tained by Mr. and Mrs. George B. Carpenter 
of Medford, Oregon, who have been making 
Del Monte their home for the past year and 
a half. 

Interesting visitors from Chicago, indulg- 
ing in golf and other out-of-door pleasures at 
Del Monte, are Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Gridley. 
Mr. Harold Swift, and Mr. Paul S. Russell. 
Harold Swift is one of the family of Swift, 
the famous packers of the Windy City and is 
a brother of Charles and Edwin F. Swift. 
His mother, Mrs. G. T. Swift, is visiting at 
Briarcliff Lodge, BiiarclirT Manor. N. Y., at 
the present time. The gentlemen of this Del 
Monte party play one round and very often 
two rounds of golf a day on the Del Monte 
course. Mr. and Mrs. Herman Spoehrs of 
Arizona, who are spending the summer at 
Carmel, are intimate friends of Harold 
Swift. 



AT CASA DEL REY 



Miss Onida Nelson, who has just returned 
from a trip through the Orient, is making a 
tour of California by motor, stopping at the 
Casa del Rev for a few days with a party, 
including Mrs. Marie A. Dee. Dr. R. H. 
Downer and Mr. Lafayette Smallpage; they 



WHY NOT ELECT A PRACTICING ATTORNEY 
FORJUDGE? 

The people of San Francisco will be called upon this fall to elect 
eight Judges of the Superior Court. 

In that connection we wish to point out that for the past twenty years 
or more the people of this city have not elected a practicing attorney to that 
office. Every judge elected during that time has either been an incumbent 
by appointment or elevated from the Justice or Police Courts. 

Of the present sixteen Superior Court Judges six were first appointed 
by the Governor, four were Justices of the Peace, four Police Judges and 
one Deputy District Attorney when elected. 

It would seem as though a practicing attorney might bring to that 
office a new appreciation of the present widespread demand for an 
improvement of judicial procedure so as to expedite business and do away 
with some of those vexatious delays which are so exasperating to both lawyer 
and client. 



\////////////////////////////////m//m////m/m///////,//s////,,., /./,.-,, ,.s.^ 



will leave for the Big Trees, Del Monte, 
Lake Tahoe and other places of interest. 
After a brief stay here Miss Nelson is 
planning an extensive journey through South 
Africa, Egypt and other countries, returning 
by way of the Orient. 

Mr. and Mrs. B. Fielding, with their at- 
tractive daughter. Miss Fielding, of Calcutta, 
India, are also guests at the Casa del Rey 
and are making a motor trip across the 
continent. 

Lieutenant and Mrs. L. K. Swenson (Mrs. 
Milo Abercrombie) stopped at the Casa del 
Rey for a few days on their honeymoon. 

An interesting party of San Franciscans 
who spent the week-end at the hotel included 
Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Heywood. Mrs. Helen 
Howard and Frederick Vincent. 

Mr. E. H. Ferguson, of the famous Jane 
Garden ranch of Sacramento, motored down 
with his two sisters, spending several days at 
the Casa del Rey. 



BRADLEY SARGENT PROVES HIS 
POPULARITY 

Don't you think it speaks well for a man 
to have more than a dozen clubs form, just 
to boost his candidacy? Well, that's what's 
happened to Judge Bradley Sargent, candi- 
date for Judge of the Superior Court of San 
Francisco. 

Judge Sargent has been Judge of the 
Superior Court for twelve years, and has 
practiced law in this city for many more. 
Clubs in every assembly district, and in the 
Twenty-fifth Senatorial district, are claiming 
him as their choice, and he has the endorse- 
ment of the following: 

The Lafayette Club. Eureka Valley Club. 
Noe Valley Club. Visitacion Valley Club. 
Presidio Club (composed of 200 business 
men). Sixth Avenue Club. Richmond Club 
(consisting of army and navy men in the 
sen ice.) 

The officers of the Park Presidio District 



Club are: President, Fred Lorenzen; vice- 
president, C. H. Barker; secretary, Mrs. Rose 
Peters; treasurer, J. M. Kidd. 

In the Twenty-fifth Senatorial District the 
club is known as the Army and Navy Service 
Members Club with Bob Morrison as presi- 
dent; 0. A. Adams, vice-president; V. 
O'Shea, secretary, and Dot Raising, 
treasurer. 

Judge Sargent is the father of a world war 
hero. Lieutenant Bradley V. Sargent, Jr., 
who gave his life for his country, in the 
Argonne. October 28, 1918. Three of the 
Judge's nephews served in the great war — 
Captain Charles Sargent, Lieutenant B. E. 
Sargent, and First Sargeant Wade Sargent. 

Surely the Sargent family has a record to 
be proud of! 



TWO CONSCIENTIOUS JUDGES 

Frank S. Brittain. 80 Cerritos avenue, this 
city, and John F. Nourse. 3512 Geary street, 
both of the District Court of Appeals, First 
Appellate District. Division Number Two. are 
coming up for re-election, on the 31st of this 
month. The Appellate Court came into 
existence several years ago, when both 
Brittain and Nourse were appointed by the 
Governor. They have shown good judg- 
ment, discrimination and careful attention to 
their duties. Their decisions have been fair 
and popular, and when judges do their duty 
conscientiously in every way. and prove their 
efficiency in every manner rwssiblc, it seems 
all unnecessary trouble and expense that 
they should have put themselves up to popu- 
lar vole in order to hold their offices by re- 
election. 

However, since these two good judges will 
be on your ballot on the 31st.. they should 
iiy unanimous vote. 



No man is ever true to a woman in both 
thought and deed unless his love for her is 
utterly hopeless. — Smart Set. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 21, 1920 




ociot 




Society is interested in the garden fete 
which will take place on the afternoon and 
evening of Friday. August 27, at the beauti- 
ful Ross Valley home of Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
Bothin. The proceeds from the affair are to 
be used for the benefit of the Protestant 
Episcopal Old Ladies' Home on Golden Gate 
avenue. 

Mrs. Eleanor Martin entertained at dinner 
last Friday at her home on Broadway in 
honor of Prince Carol of Rumania and his 
party, who left for the North to visit in 
Portland and Seattle before going East. 

Mrs. Herbert E. Coil of Woodland has an- 
nounced the engagement of her daughter. 
Miss Kathleen Nelson Coil, to David Farragut 
Ashe, the son of Mrs. Francis H. Davis and 
a brother of Gaston B. Ashe. After the 
wedding, which will take place in the spring, 
the young couple will make their home in 
San Benito county. 

Miss Marion Filmer, who will become the 
bride of Donald Bradford on September I , 
entertained a few of her friends informally at 
tea last Friday afternoon at her home on 
Scott street. 

Dr. and Mrs. William Lyle of New York 
have arrived in California to pass the next 
few months, returning East early in the 
winter. The visitors are the guests of Mrs. 
Eugene Joly de Sabla and Mrs. Clement 
Tobin at the Tobin home in El Cerrito. Dr. 
and Mrs. Lyle will visit in Del Monte for 
several weeks during the summer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Nixon, who visited in 
San Francisco during the period of the 
Democratic convention, sailed from New 
York last week to remain abroad until late in 
the fall. They will divide their time be- 
tween London and Paris. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Birmingham, who have 
passed the early summer months in Belve- 
dere, have returned to town, and are enter- 
taining their daughter, Miss Alma Birming- 
ham of Chicago. 

Mrs. Edgar Zook. who has been ill at her 
home in San Rafael for some time, will leave 
as soon as her health permits for a ten days' 
stay at Lake Tahoe. 

Colonel H. Compton Jones, U. S. A., who 
has been visiting his parents, Colonel and 
Mrs. W. K. Jones at the Presidio, has left for 
West Point, where he has been made an 
instructor in the department of mathematics. 

Mrs. Helen Uhl and her daughter. Miss 
Constance Uhl, of Piedmont, were at Del 
Monte for a few days. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Lilley, who have 



a beautiful home in San Rafael, are in town 
for a few days, staying at the Palace. 

Mrs. Joseph D. Peters and her daughter, 
Miss Anne Peters, who have been at the 
Casa del Rey in Santa Cruz, have returned 
to their apartments at the Fairmont. 

An engagement of interest to the younger 
set of society is that which was announced 
of Miss Dorothy Mann to Innes Randolph, 
son of Mrs. Marion Randolph of New York. 
Miss Mann, who is an unusually attractive 
girl with dark brown hair and brown eyes, 
is tall and very graceful and quite an athlete, 
being devoted to all out-door sports. She is 
the daughter of Mrs. Maude Daulton Mann 
and Seth Mann and a sister of Daulton 
Mann. With her mother. Miss Mann will 
leave in about ten days for Yokohama, 
where the wedding is to take place and 
where Randolph is in business. Their plans 
are not definite, and it is not yet known 
whether the prospective bride and bride- 
groom will make their home in the Orient or 
in New York. 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel C. Jackling and Dr. 
and Mrs. Herbert Allen have returned from a 
fortnight's visit at Tahoe. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. Dibblee and their 
daughters have joined the summer colony at 
Feather River Inn. 

Mrs. James Bull of the Fairmont, and 
wife of Commodore Bull, entertained a few 
friends informally at dinner recently. 

Miss Margaret Lee, the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Cuyler Lee, will go East to school 
this fall, joining her sister. Miss Rosamonde 
Lee, in New York. 

Mrs. Willard Drown has returned to town 
after a visit at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry Horsley Scott at Pebble Beach. 

Mrs. Charles H. Holbrook, Jr., who has 
been at the Ambassador in Santa Barbara 
for the past three weeks, will return to San 
Francisco within the coming fortnight. 



Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Anderson gave a 
dinner last Thursday at their home in San 
Rafael. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Duncan will super- 
vise the erection of their new home in El 
Cerrito, expecting to take possession early 
next spring. The property adjoins that of 
Richard Tobin above the polo field. 

Mr. and Mrs. George A. Moore have 
opened their home in San Rafael after a visit 
of several months in New York as the guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Geissler at their 
country place there. 

Thursday evening Miss Dorothy Fithian of 
Santa Barbara, entertained at a delightful 
dinner in honor of Miss Geraldine Graham 
and her fiance, Whitney Warren, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Welch chaperoned 
a group of the friends of their daughter. 
Miss Marie Welch, at dinner, followed by a 
theatre party, one evening last week. 

Mrs. George Rodman Shreve announces 
the engagement of her daughter, Mrs. Re- 
becca Shreve Stockton, to Captain R. Leslie 
Shaw of the Bedfordshire regiment of the 
British army. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Donahoe Grant and 
the Misses Josephine and Edith, who have 
been abroad all summer, will arrive in New 
York this week, with plans to come West 
immediately. 

Mrs. G. A. Humphreys Davis is visiting in 
San Francisco from her home in New 
Zealand. She will be a guest at the home of 
her sister, Mrs. Leonard Chenery, for the 
next three or four months. 

Commander John Powers, U. S. N., en- 
tertained a few friends at dinner last Friday 
evening at his quarters at Mare Island, later 
taking his guests to the dance at the Country 
club. Those who shared the pleasure of the 
evening were: Captain and Mrs. Henry 
Odell, U. S. N., Commander and Mrs. John 
Poole, Miss Vere de Vere Adams. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Payot, who have 
been sojourning at Aetna Springs for the 
past month, have returned to San Francisco 
and taken apartments at the Hotel Cecil. 

Commander and Mrs. Kirby Crittenden, 
who are passing the summer at Ross, are 
entertaining as their house guests Mr. and 
Mrs. Paul Fay, who will remain across the 
bay for several days. 



Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

SPECIALIZES IN 

TAR SHAMPOOS 

MR. and MRS. A. F. COSQROVE 

TELEPHONE KEARNY 2842 



August 21. 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 



Library Table 



A Modem Crusader 

"J. Wilbur Chapman — A Biography," 
which Doubleday, Page & Co. will publish, 
is the history of a spiritual genius, a minister 
who was able to make goodness a sensation. 
Perhaps the most remarkable feature of his 
ministry was that he achieved these results 
without violating the canons of good taste 
and shocking the proprieties, but through the 
sheer force of a strong and consecrated per- 
sonality. 

Starting as pastor of two little country 
churches in adjoining Indiana villages Doctor 
Chapman soon made his influence felt 
throughout the United States and beyond. 
Accompanied by his biographer, Dr. Ford C. 
Ottman, he made evangelistic tours of the 
British Isles, the Holy Land, the Philippine 
Islands, Australia, New Zealand, Tasmania, 
China, Korea and Japan. The final outpour- 
ing of his energies was in connection with 
the Nationa IService Commission organized 
by the Presbyterian church to aid in the war. 
Completely exhausted at last, he died in a 
New York hospital a month after the sign- 
ing of the armistice. 

The book is the work of an intimate friend 
and associate of this great modern crusader. 



Inspired Patriotism 

Because of the demand for Margaret 
Prescott Montague's new story, "Uncle Sam 
of Freedom Ridge." Doubleday, Page & 
Co. advanced the publication date of the 
book from August 5 to July 7, bringing it 
out in celebration of the Fourth of July. 
Miss Montague, whose poignant little "Eng- 
land to America" was awarded the 0. Henry 
Memorial Prize by the Society of Arts and 
Sciences of New York, has written in "Uncle 
Sam of Freedom Ridge" a cry of patriotism 
which is finding echo in the hearts of thou- 
sands of Americans who set love of country 
over politics. 

The story is a plea for a return to the 
high purpose which characterized our na- 
tional endeavot dining the w.ir. Whatever 
his political opponents say of him. they will 
all admit the discriminating literary taste of 
President Wilson who said of the story in his 
historic interview with Louis Seibold: "The 
lady has written a story which breathe 
patriotism so pure and wholesome as to make 
the other things of life seem of little conse- 
quence. 1 wish that e\ery person that ques- 
tions the benefits to humanity that will be 
guaranteed by the League of Nations might 
read it." 

Miss Montague has had many requests to 
publish the story in the native languages of 



the foreigners who are such a considerable 
per cent of Americans, because it is felt 
that they, too, should have an opportunity 
to appreciate the beautiful lesson in practi- 
cal, livable patriotism and wholesome Ameri- 
canism which the story teaches. 



Dreams That Came True 

Why Harold MacGrath sometimes dips his 
quill in rainbows instead of sober ink he ex- 
plains by recalling his own rich background 
of experiences which, though actual, seem 
like the realization of the little boy's wishes 
in the fairy tale. 

"I have had some of my boyhood dreams 
come true," says Mr. McGrath. "I have 
ridden elephants through jungles. I have 
seen prowling tigers on the station platforms 
at night — from the safety of my car win- 
dow! Once my wife wanted to bring home 
a baby elephant that was for sale at Prome 
in Burma. But I argued her out of it, with 
hay at twenty dollars the ton. I have found 
cobras on the cement floor of my shower 
bath in Mandalay. Not being a duly ac- 
credited amateur, I can't claim the standing 
high jump. I have been robbed by guides 
and monkeys and ringed-neck crows and 
hotel keepers. I have been stranded in 
Egypt and Japan. But, oh,. 1 have seen 
things." 



Kipling in Vermont 

Rudyard Kipling's new "Letters of Travel" 
remind us that the prophet of England is 
linked to America, especially New England, 
by very close ties: It was in Vermont that 
Kipling met his wife and there on a little 
farm not far south of Brattleboro where 
Massachusetts. Vermont and New Hampshire 
meet, that he built his first home and did 
some of his best work lying on a rug in 
front of a blazing fire of pine. 

"Now that 1 have heard the long, unhur- 
ried drawl ol Ycimont." he writes in record- 
ing his impressions of these days, "my won- 
der is. not that the New England tales should 
be printed in what, for the sake of argument, 
we will call English and its type, but rather 
that they should not have appeared in 
Swedish or Russian. Our alphabet is too 
limited. This part of the country belongs by 
hwrs unknown to the United States, but 
which obtain all the world over, to the New 
England story and the ladies who write it." 



The Russian Peasant and the Revolution 
An incident which shows why Bolshevism 
is so generally accepted by the Russian 
•ts because it promises what they have 



so long desired — ownership of the land, is 
told by Colonel Andrew Kalpaschnikoff in 
his recent book, "A Prisoner of Trotzky's" 
(Doubleday, Page & Company). 

"When the Bolsheviki told the farmers to 
take the land," says Colonel Kalpaschnikoff, 
"my brother was still on our estates near the 
Volga, and was asked to preside at a meet- 
ing of the representatives of the villages. 
They asked him to mark on the map of the 
estates a division of the land. Afterward 
they expressed the desire to discuss the 
question of the price and were much dis- 
appointed that my brother could not make 
out the deed, as all notaries' offices were 
closed; they even went further and offered 
to deposit the money at the bank, if my 
brother would give a written promise that he 
would turn over the estates to them and not 
to other buyers who might turn up later. 
Such is the psychology of the Russian people 
as they pass through their revolution." 



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TELEPHONE GARFIELD 835 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 21, 1920 



Sunbeams 



"In these days it's almost impossible to get 
what you want." 

"I know it. There was a time when my 
husband would give me anything I asked for 
if I only cried a little. Now I have to go 
into hysterics."- -American Legion Weekly. 



"Is he a lyrical American?" 

"Yes; he likes baseball, has a motor car, 
owes a mortgage, pays alimony and thinks 
the motion pictures have grand opera beaten 
a mile." — Life. 



Once a year the newsboys of a certain dis- 
trict of London are taken for an outing up 
the Thames by a gentleman of the neighbor- 
hood, where they can bathe to their heart's 
content. 

As one little boy was getting into the 
water, a friend observed: "I say Bill, ain't 
yer dirty!" 

"Yes," replied Bill. "I missed the train 
larst year." — Tit-Bits. 



An old colored man was burning dead 
grass when a "wise guy" draped himself over 
the fence. "You're foolish to do that. Uncle 
Eb," he told the bent figure; "it will make 
the meadow as black as you are." 

"Don't worry 'bout dat, sah," responded 
the undisturbed Uncle Eb. "Dat grass will 
grow out an' be as green as you is." — 
Pacific Mutual News. 



When the train stopped at a little station 
in the south a tourist from the north emerged 
and gazed curiously at a lean animal rubbing 
itself against a scrub oak. "What do you 
call that?" he asked a native. 

"Razor-back hawg, suh." 

"What's he rubbing himself against the 
tree for?" 

"He's stroppin' hisself, suh, jes' stroppin' 
hisself." — Everybody's Magazine. 



Don't smoke around the tank. If your 
life's isn't worth anything, gasoline is! — 
Pacific Mutual News. 



Jud Tunkins says that this year's farm 
hands expect to make enough to come back 
next year as summer boarders. — Town Crier. 



No woman is really lost to hope until she 
is so fat that it is impossible to hug her. — 
Smart Set. 



STUDIO GOSSIP 

By the Eavesdropper. 

[NOTE. — The Studio Gossip will be glad lo 
"eavesdrop" on any movie star's wire and tell you 
what you want to know about these people. Just 
send a note addressed to her in care of "The News 
Letter.' ] 

San Francisco is getting to be very popu- 
lar as a locality for motion picture sets. The 
Goldwyn Pictures Corporation has taken its 
companies "north" on no less than three of 
its big pictures 'within the last six weeks. 

The fact that Los Angeles could not sup- 
ply sufficiently crowded traffic scenes to suit 
Al Green, Jack Pickford's director in "The 
Man Who Had Everything" may be taken 
either as a compliment to the southern city's 
rigid traffic laws, or laid to the door of the 
goddess Alrinach (who presides over earth- 
quakes and storms at sea). 

The Palace hotel was used recently in 
scenes for "The Great Lover" — also several 
roadhouse shots were taken in the vicinity 
of Tail's at the beach. 

Not only are the scenes for Will Rogers' 
next picture, "The Guile of Women," being 
taken this week in San Francisco, but San 
Francisco will get the credit. The first 
caption in the picture is "Through the 
Golden Gate to San Francisco." The story, 
in which Rogers plays the .part of a Swedish 
sailor, will be taken for the most part in San 
Francisco, along the water front, on the bay, 
and in a residence on "Nob Hill," which is 
being used as the home of the president of 
the steamship line in the picture. It is per- 
haps the first time that San Francisco has 
had opportunity to display the beauty of its 
bay in a photodrama and receive credit for 
it on the screen. 

Many of the motion picture people in Los 
Angeles are natives of San Francisco, and 
while earning big salaries and living in the 
southern part of the State, never lose their 
fealty for the town of their nativity. Irene 
Rich is one of these. Miss Rich left San 
Francisco three years ago, to venture inex- 
perienced and without influence, into the 
moving picture game. She is now one of the 
most written of and photographed feminine 
"leads" in filmdom. At her studio she is 
called everything from a "peach of a girl," 
a "regular girl." a "real girl," and even "a 
princess." It is her San Francisco vim and 
democratic, co-operative spirit that does it. 
she says. While she has a very pretty home 
in Hollywood, she often steals away to the 
city of her birth, and returns to work re- 
freshed and radiant. She makes no pretense 
of the fact that "she's just had a breath 
of life." 



THE STREAM'S ENDING 

By Richard Leigh 

Turbulent with dash and roar 

Down the rocks you come a leaping. 

All the wild adventure o'er, 

To the lake that lies a sleeping. 

Spreading out its lilied floor. 

Far away the mist-hung mountain 

Whence you sprang, a crystal fountain. 
Gliding down the purple hills. 

Scattered in a skein of rills. 
Gathered to a singing stream. 

Falling thence into a dream. 
Through dim lanes of willows brimming. 

Past the angler stealing by — 
Arrowhead and dragon-fly, 

And the madcap swallows skimming. 
Next o'er pebbles hoarsely humming. 

On through darkling pine woods drumming. 
Out into the sunlight glancing; 

Oh, but it was merry going 
Round the tumbled boulders dancing. 

O'er the mill-dam overflowing. 
Free of foot to gleam and wander. 

All your happy heart to squander! 

Now your waywardness is done, 

All your laughing course is run; 
Ah, my wild and wanton rover, 

All your shining quests are over! 
There's an end of all your singing, 

All your fluting and your flinging; 
In the bosom of the lake 

You your long quietus make. 
Placid as the nenuphars. 

Silent as the mirrored stars. 

— Munsey's Magazine. 



The Pathways to happiness are ten. And 
after each attainment there is the crash of a 
broken commandment. — Smart Set. 



How much pleasanter life would be if one 
could kiss a pretty girl and yet not have to 
read her 12-page letter the next day! — 
Smart Set. 



COPHETUA'S QUEEN 

By Theodosia Garrison 
My neck was never bowed before I hung a 

jewel on it. 
My hands were always free until I weighted 

them with rings. 
Till I found the golden robe .and the pride 

to don it, 
Till I wore the silken shoon with their silver 

strings 
I ran free and ragged with the world's wild 

things. 

Yet honor is a jewel, and one is proud to 

bear it. 
And duty makes the rings I wear and one 

would keep them bright, 
A king's love is a golden robe and glad am I 

to wear it. 
And 1 must walk in careful paths to keep my 

shoon aright. 
/ n>on</cr /ton* Ihc broo]( xeould feci to na^n/ feci 
lonighl ! 

— Everybody's Magazine. 



"These are gloomy limes." 
"No wonder, with everybody out of 
spirits." — Town Crier. 



August 21. 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



Pleasure's Wand 

"We Obey No Wand But Pleasure's" 
By "Casu." 



bill this week assures every visitor, be he in 
search of fun, phantasy, music, merriment, 
sentiment or smiles, a satisfying evening. 



Shades of Montmartre at Columbia. 

Maude Fulton has written a play about 
things that she understands, reproduced 
scenes and characters so true to place and 
type that while the drama does not achieve 
greatness, it entirely escapes mediocrity. In 
it she plays the part of the heroine, a little 
waif of the Paris slums, a cafe companion- 
dancer to an Apache. All that is in the past. 
We find her in bohemian New York, accupy- 
ing a studio next door to a pair of im- 
pecunious young men, one an artist chap 
and the other a very amusing newspaper 
person. 

Toinette (Miss Fulton) is a good neigh- 
bor; she makes biscuits for breakfast and 
darns their socks. Her comfy little ways, 
her delightful camaraderie and her funny 
breaks into American slang, all endear her 
to these lads and the play starts off with a 
most engaging studio scene, where the three 
of them sit and chat and make real talk, so 
genuine and so natural that one is reminded 
of DuMaurier, Murger and other of those 
writing fellows who have lived and loved in 
Paris' Quartier Latin and then made it 
famous. 

Miss Fulton knows her Paris and she has 
an accent that is pure gold it is so perfect. 
In intonation and idiomatic errors, it is abso- 
lutely all right. Her bird-like articulation is 
well managed, and any one who has listened 
to those chic little French feminine things 
chattering in another language will totally 
disagree with an eminent local dramatic 
critic who does not care for this accent and 
thinks it should be "sacrificed" so thai the 
audience can get all the lines. Pull the wool 
out of your ears. Thomas! I heard every 
word she uttered and I was sitting away up 
by the curtains — not the curtain — also I was 
reading a last week's program all about the 
Frivolities, but that is another story. 

Oliver Morosco has made the most and 
the vest best that could be made out of Mill 
Fulton's good material. The play runs along 
with delightful smoothness; the pauses and 
the action are all well arranged and erf. 

Toinette has become a filler in ,< smart 
dressmaker establishment in New York. Her 
Apache lo*er who is dumb and terribly 
tragic, follows her and the scene in which 
she dances the old waltz with him and then 
adroilly locks a door on him and makes her 
escape, is well done. Of com so. the Apache 
dance is old and il was a good idea not to 
overdo it. Just enough to give us the spirit 
of the thing. 



The story runs on in a most interesting 
fashion. Types are introduced that call 
forth our unfeigned admiration, and if only 
I had the right program I'd tell you who 
played the different parts. I know that 
Henry B. Walthall was Jules Leferier, a very 
distinguished Frenchman with a legion button 
in his coat and a bad cold in his voice, and 
I recognized Florence Oberle in the New 
York dame of fashion. An old love affair 
between these two is an interesting part of 
the plot. 
- Toinette's and the young newspaper man's 
love affair is very prettily carried on. The 
simplicity of Miss Fulton's methods and her 
knowledge of just how to dress herself are 
two of her assets. 

There are very few flat spots in the play; 
some of the lines are bright, not brilliant; 
the human-being element is strong in every 
part of it. It is a most enjoyable play. 



Orpheum. Big Work by Little Folk. 

We take the children this week to see 
vaudeville, and it is difficult to say whether 
they or we have the best time. Squeals of 
delight are heard all over the theatre as 
Singer's Midgets proceed with their variety 
entertainment. The remarkable talents of 
these tiny people shine in every part of their 
interesting act. and the smallness of. the 
artists seems to increase the greatness of 
their ability. 

Miss Georgia Campbell is in her second 
week, charming her audiences at every per- 
formance. She is like a lovely flower sway- 
ing in the soft summer breeze when she 
dances; like a meadow laik when she sings; 
like a true southern lady when she smiles and 
losses her dainty head. 

Raymond Wjrlie'i <ompany gives a very 
attractive performance. The variety of the 



Big Revue at the Curran. 

The critic has called this show "refreshing 
throughout" and while the phrase suggests 
a shower bath rather than a musical comedy 
with satirical tendencies, he is right; it is a 
refreshing, a delightfully exhilarating affair. 
The lyrics are uncommonly good, real poetry 
in several cases, and the music is pleasing. 

The girls are many and marvelous, just 
one pretty thing after another. The scenes, 
particularly the gypsy camp and the trap- 
per's clearing in the Northwest, are works 
of stage art, and the variety of them shows 
that the producers went the limit to make 
the Satires of 1920 memorable in scenic 
effect. 

Fanchon and Marco who wrote the songs 
and music are brother and sister, an unique 
twain. A large audience enjoyed an evening 
of diverting entertainment, beautifully pre- 
sented and well acted. 



Alcazar. 

Jesse Lynch Williams' very clever comedy. 
"Why Marry?" is now playing at the Alcazar 
and is one of our stock company's triumphs 
this season. The play is sparkling with 
bright lines, and these are read with intelli- 
gent understanding in every case by the 
actors. Full of world wisdom that is bandied 
back and forth, creating laughs and gasps of 
admiration, the play is almost Shavian in 
spots. 

The three acts take place in "A country 
house not far from the city," and the city in 
this instance is undoubtedly New York, for 
those cynical bits of flint could be struck 
from no other forge, methinks. It is a 
"talky" play and the esprit de corps of the 
Alcazar players serves them well in keeping 
the conversational ball a-rolling. 

Emily Pinter and Ben Erway. as the juve- 
nile lovers, start things going: their methods 
are most modern. Gladys Emmons (in the 
play. "Lucy." wife of a perfect brute of a 



The New Society Blue Book 

Wishes to announce thai they are now making ready for press. 
This book will contain the names ar.d addresses, phones, etc., of 
the most prominent families in San Francisco. Alameda Co.. 
Marin Co.. San Mateo Co.. etc. Also men and women's clubs of 
high social standing. 

For Reservations and Addresses. Communicate With 

Marguerite M. Pinchard, Publisher 

1659 Mason St. Vhont Franklin 6912 San Francisco. Cal. 



Subscription Price SS.OO Per Year 




14 



man), held my attention by her poise, her 
excellent enunciation and the admirable 
manner in which she uses her voice and pro- 
nounces her words. These qualities should 
be the rule rather than' the exception. Miss 
Emmons has temperament and considerable 
emotional expression. It is a pleasure to 
listen to her. After all, why should three- 
syllable words be jerked out in one syllable 
and that one almost unintelligible? Why 
should "Victorian" become "Victorn?" Must 
"Paris" be called "Pairce"' And "News — 



;?" Is 



to be 



r'" 



Rafael Brunetto made a truly good clergy- 
man, in locks, manner and temperament. 
The part suited him perfectly. So well was 
he cast in this churchman role that I must 
own my desire to see him do a romantic part 
is not so insistent. I think we may conse- 
crate him to the Church. His collar buttons 
naturally in the back. 

Brady Kline has a tremendous part and he 
makes good in it. Oh, what a horrid hus- 
band for a nice girl to have, and so rich 
withal! He is utterly convincing and does 
not "miss a point. Rather too much clipping 
and slurring in his speech, but otherwise 
very effective in the part. Al Cunningham's 
"Uncle Everett" is very wordy and we must 
forgive him if some of his lines got away 
from him and came back at the wrong place. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

As the witty, cynical, devoted husband whose 
wife in Reno sends him a telegram every few 
hours, Mr. Cunningham made a success. He 
has a heartiness about him that is agreeable. 

Every member of the cast brought out all 
the humor in the play in a most satisfactory 
manner. I admired Frederick Green's 
butler; it is good to see a small part played 
carefully and made the most of in an un- 
ostentatious way. 

Like the children with a box of sweets, 
we've saved the best till last. Miss Ragan 
and Mr. Ayres are a most lovable pair of 
lovers. They have -some very pretty scenes 
full of unusual interest. As Helen, Inez 
Ragan is earnest and appealing, and her 
voice when she pleads with her lover has a 
wonderfully thrilling quality. The import- 
ance of being Ernest, the hero, is keenly felt 
by Mr. Dudley Ayres. 

Rosebrook's musical program consisted of 
such fitting selections as "I Wonder Why I 
Love You," "That's Why," "The Marriage 
Market," "Stop, Look, Listen," "The Honey- 
moon," and added greatly to the enjoyment 
of the evening. 



ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS 
Orpheum 

Due to their extreme popularity and the 
peculiar interest they hold for children and 



August 21, 1920 

grown-ups, Singer's Midgets are held over 
one more week at the Orpheum in top head- 
line position. This is an unusual honor 
seldom accorded. The midgets' second week 
starts Sunday. 

The turn as thousands of San Franciscans 
have witnessed this week, consists of thirty 
tiny men and women in a variety of scenes 
and exhibiting such an assortment of skill 
as seldom has been witnessed. A large 
menagerie of animals accompanies the act, 
making it take the appearance of a full 
grown circus, but presented by people who 
are far from being full grown. 

An entirely new bill of vaudeville accom- 
panies Singer's Midgets' second week. 
Clarence Oliver and George Olp will be seen 
in "The Bee Hive," their latest and said to 
be their neatest offering for advanced vaude- 
ville. These two vaudevillians are known 
here for their "Discontent" and "The Wall 
Between," two sketches which set them 
firmly in the hearts of San Francisco's vaude- 
\ille going populace. 

Lovelt's Concentration is described as a 
real mystery, embracing music, science and 
mirth. A revelation in mind reading and 
psychic power entirely different from that 
offered by other acts coming under this de- 
scription, is their accomplishment. The band 
of mystery, a jazz quintette playing numbers 



• 



: ■ — ~ ' 




The Band of Mystery a one of the features of Ceorgc Lovelt's Coneentralion. a pretentious mystery act 

at the Orpheum next meelt. The hand plays at the whim of its leader although 

the musicians are blindfolded and cannot sec his gestures. 



r> , w , w^ , w,W^^^^ - ■w////«w///////#///////;/////////^^^^^ 



August 21, 1920 




S,. W ^,. V &#vuu*Cuuaut ^' 



Starting Sunday 



IS THE[R FINAL WEEK 

Singer's Midgets 



And a Brand New Orpheum Bill Consisting of 
DUFFY & SWEENEY I DAVE HARRIS 

Oliver and OIp 

W. HORLICK & SARAMPA SISTERS 
JOHN ORREN & LILLIAN DREW 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

in a manner described as baffling, goes with 
the act. 

Jimmy Duffy and Mr. Sweeney, two lively 
young Yanks, will indulge in a "kidding" 
number, built on American lines of humor. 
Dave Harris, one of vaudeville's foremost 
syncopationists, will be heard in a variety of 
numbers. W. Herlic and Sarampa sisters 
will be seen in descriptive dances. John 
Orren and Lillian Drey will offer their "barn- 
yard" episode. Arco Brothers will prove 
their claim to being athletes supreme. Topics 
of the Day and Orpheum Concert Orchestra 
are other featured numbers. 



ARCO BROTHERS 



TOPICS OF THE DAY 



ORPHEUM CONCERT ORCHESTRA 

Lovett's Concentration 

MATINEE DAILY— Phone Douglas 70 
Matinees— 25c to 75c Evenings — 25c to $1 
(Except Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays) 
DON'T BUY TICKETS from SCALPERS 

ALCAZAR 

THIS WEEK— THE SATIRICAL COMEDY 

"WHY MARRY" 

WEEK COM. NEXT SUN., MAT., AUG. 22 

Enormous Popular Demand Revival of the Adorable 

Comedy of Romance 

"PEG 0' MY HEART" 

Ideal Play With the Ideal Cast 
NEW ALCAZAR COMPANY 

INEZ RAGAN DUDLEY AYRES 

SUN. MAT.. AUG. 29— First Time in the West 
Special Permission of David Belasco 
"DADDIES" 
Delightful Comedy About the Lillle Foreign War- 
Waifs Adopted by American Bachelors. 
Ever y Evening. Matinees Sun.. Thurs., Sat. 

SUMMONS 
No. 108559 
In the Superior Court of the Slate* of California, 
in and for the City and County of San P rancisco. 
Edward Craig. Plainliff. 

vs. 
Julia Elizabeth Craig, Defendant. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the Stale 
of California in and for the city and County of San 
Francisco, and the complaint filed in the office of 
the County Clerk of said City and County. 

The People of the State of California send Greet- 
ing lo Julia Elizabeth Craig, Defendant. 

You are hereby required to appear in an action 
brought against you by the above-named plaintiff 
in the Superior Court of the State of California, 
in and for the City and County of San Francisco, 
and to answer the Complaint filed therein within ten 
days (exclusive of the day of service) after the 
service on you of this summons, if served within 
the City and County ; or if served elsewhere within 
thirty days. 

The said aclion is brought to obtain a judgment 
and decree of this Court dissolving the bonds of 
matrimony now existing between plaintiff and de- 
fendant, on the ground of defendant's extreme cruelty 
and desertion, also for general relief, as will more 
fully appear in the Complaint on file, to which 
special reference is hereby made. 

And you are hereby notified thai unless you 
appeal and answer as above required, the said 
Plaintiff will take judgment for any money or 
damages demanded in the complaint as arising upon 
contract or will apply to the Court for any other 
relief demanded in the Complaint. 

Given under my hand and the Seal of the 
Superior Court of the State of California, in and 
for the City and County of San Francisco this 
28th dav of July, A. D. I92tt 
(Seal) 111 MULCREVY, Clerk. 

Bj I |.WEI CH. Deputy Clerk. 
J \V. HendeiMM,. 508 Humboldt Bank Bldg.. San 
Francisco, Cal., Attorney for Plaintiff. 



Alcazar 

The Alcazar, as a practical business insti- 
tution, lends attentive ear to the demands of 
the people, so here comes merry, irresistible 
"Peg 0' My Heart" again next Sunday to 
gladden thousands unable, from force of cir- 
cumstance, to see this adorable play during 
its record-breaking presentation a month 
ago. There will be no change in the "Peg" 
cast so enthusiastically acclaimed as one 
never surpassed in any theatre of the land. 
Triumphs were won by Inez Ragan as the 
witching little Irish American lass; Dudley 
Ayres as the magnetic, delightfully poised 
Jerry; honored Emelie Melville in her 
original character of the proud British 
matron; Ben Erway and Emily Pinter as the 
priggish brother and sister; Brady Kline as 
the amorous Brent; Rafael Brunetto as the 
family solicitor and Al Cunningham as the 
haughty butler. An ideal cast for an ideal 
play. 

"Daddies," to follow Sunday matinee. 
August 29, for the first time on the Pacific 
Coast, is another special manifestation of 
David Belasco's brotherly affection for the 
Alcazar. This play tugs at the heart-strings 
of all lovers of helpless childhood. 



15 



ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE 
STATE OF CALIFORNIA, IN AND FOR 
THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN 
FRANCISCO. 
In the Matter of the Application of SOUTHER 
FREIGHT HANDLING AND STEVEDOR- 
DORING COMPANY for a change of its 
Corporate Name to SOUTHER WARE- 
HOUSE COMPANY. No. 108448. Dept. 16. 
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE WHY AP- 
PLICATION FOR CHANGE OF NAME 
SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED. 

Souther Freight Handling and Stevedoring Com- 
pany, the said corporation, and Kenneth Monteagle 
and A. T. Gibson, a majority of the Directors 
thereof, having filed and presented an application 
that the name of said Souther Freight Handling and 
Stevedoring Company be changed to Souther Ware- 
house Company. 

IT IS HEREBY ORDERED that all persons 
interested in said matter appear before the Superior 
Court of the State of California in and for the City 
and County of San Francisco, Department 16 
thereof, at the City Hall, No. 400 Van Ness 
Avenue, in said City and County on Monday (he 
30th day of August, 1920, al the hour of 10 
o'clock A. M., or as soon thereafter as counsel can 
be heard, to show cause why such application for 
change of name should not be granted- 

AND IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that 
notice of said application and of this order be given 
by publication of a copy of this order in The San 
Francisco News Letter, a newspaper of general 
circulation, printed and published in the said City 
and County of San Francisco, State of California, 
once a week for four successive weeks before said 
hearing. 

Dated this 22d day of July, 1920. 

BERNARD J. FLOOD. 
Judge of the Superior Court. 
ENDORSED 
Filed July 22. 1920. 

H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 
By L. J. WELCH. Deputy Clerk. 
MONTEAGLE & RIXFORD. 
Attorneys for Applicant. 

14 Montgomery Street. San Francisco, Cal. 



CLEVER EXTRAVAGANZA AT 
MARQUARDS 

See the "extravaganza extraordinaire," 
entitled "Hello, California," at Marquard's. 
corner of Geary and Mason streets. As its 
name implies, this little show is full of local 
color and colloquialism, and should especially 
appeal to all sons and daughters of the 
West. 

Marquard's serves dinner de luxe from 6 
to 10, and also an after-theatre supper from 
I I to I. Go to this "smart place for smart 
people." 



Jenkins was sitting down to breakfast one 
morning, when he was astounded to see in 
the paper an announcement of his own 
death. He rang up friend Smith at once. 
"Halloa, Smith ! " he said. "Have you seen 
the announcement of my death in the 
paper?" "Yes," replied Smith, "where are 
you speaking from?" — The Observer. 



E. F. HUTTON & GO. 



MEMBERS 



New York Stock Exchange 

490 California St. and St. Francis Hotel 
Branch: Del Monte Hotel 

Private Wires 
Coast to Coast 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIALTY 
Btuli 

548 Sacramento St., cor. Leideidorff 



Old Hampshire Bond 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

Tfte Standard Paper for Business Stationery. 
"Made a lillle better than seems necessary." The 
typewriter papers are sold in attractive and durable 
boxes containing live hundred perfect sheets, plain 
or marginal ruled. The manuscript covers are sold 
in similar boxes containing one hundred sheets. 
Order through your printer or stationer, or. if so de- 
sired we will send a sample book showing the antire 
line. 

BLAKE, M0FFIT & TGWNE 

Established 
I [RST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 21, 1920 



wornohih 




Summer time, vacation time, and play 
time have hit hard in all parts of the country 
at this season, exerting a wilful influence 
quite upsetting the scheduled plans of the 
ordinary individual and cutting deep into 
such erstwhile interests as the high cost of 
living, political conventions, suffrage, pro- 
hibition, etc. 

Its motor away for Mr. America, Mrs. 
America and little America, from cradle 
occupant to high school graduate. For the 
time being the larger interests are in the 
background, change and rest are the thing. 

And why not? All work and no play 
makes Jack a dull boy. We must have 
occasional relief from our typical high pres- 
sure existence. 

The time is now — Let's go. 
There are hundreds of automobiles of all 
descriptions now upon the Lincoln Highway 
between New York and San Francisco 
carrying their occupants into new fields of 
scenic and historic interest and into a new 
and delightful environment of wholesome, 
health-giving enjoyment. 

Reports even as early as June to the 
Lincoln Highway Association in Detroit re- 
vealed that more than one thousand tourists 
passed through Salt Lake City. Utah, in the 
first twelve days of that month, that seventy- 
five cars took on supplies at Evanston, Wyo., 
on the Lincoln Highway in one day. Similar 
reports came from all along the line. 

And what of the Lincoln Highway trip 
that may be enjoyed by an even greater 
number of tourists this year than ever be- 
fore? What of the present conditions of this 
great highway spanning eleven States be- 
tween New York and San Francisco? What 
of the scenic and historic attractions that 
make of this the favored route of all long 
distance motor travel? 

Radically different are the conditions 
which the motorist will find upon this trans- 
continental thoroughfare today from those 
existing but a few years back. 

The Lincoln Highway permanently defined 
and connected in its entirety extends with- 
out a gap from Forty-second street and 
Broadway, New York City, to Golden Gate. 
In the past five years millions of dollars have 
been expended in its improvement, yet it 
must not be taken for granted that it is today 
in any sense a finished and perfected boule- 
vard. Far from it. 



Excepting for a very few miles all of the 
Lincoln Highway from the eastern terminus 
to the Missouri river is improved road. 
Upon this stretch through the States of New 
Jersey. Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana and 
Illinois an extensive building program is 
under way this year and the detours necessi- 
tated by this work form the most irksome 
part of the drive. 

But three years ago the New Jersey and 
Pennsylvania sections of the Lincoln High- 
way were well kept scenic boulevards, 
macadam paved and perfectly maintained. 
The surprising and tremendous development 
of motor truck travel which centered upon 
and still taxes this section of the highway 
proved too great a burden for this type of 
surfacing; the road could not stand the 
burden. It gave way. Every effort, how- 
ever, is made to keep the highway open to 
travel by the most practical means of main- 
tenance and in a large instance the road is 
being rebuilt with more durable material, 
planned to carry and care for traffic of all 
descriptions for the present and in the 
future. 

Like conditions, although to a lesser de- 
gree, exist in Ohio, Indiana and Illinois. The 
amount of new construction under way in 
these States upon the Lincoln Highway will 
surprise and impress even the least interested 
of those who travel this route by motor car. 
Millions of dollars are being expended at 
this time to make of this a straight through, 
interstate artery of commercial and passenger 
travel originally conceived by the founders 
of the Lincoln Highway. 

A great expanse of constructive improve- 
ment is to be observed by the traveler as he 
continues westward across the great grain 
producing Stales of Iowa and Nebraska. 
But from the Mississippi river west to the 



Coast, with the exception of California, the 
permanent hard surfaced road has not as 
yet fully come into its own. However, the 
ice is broken, a start has been made. 
Responding to the ceaseless efforts of the 
Lincoln Highway Association directed to this 
end since 1913, great progress is being made. 

Even in Iowa, long known as the muddiest 
of mud road States, concrete section of the 
Lincoln Highway have made their appear- 
ance. They are also to be seen in Nebraska. 
Much of the route in these two States is 
gravel and where not otherwise improved is 
well graded and drained. A constant effort 
is necessary to keep these other than hard 
surfaced sections of the Lincoln Highway in 
condition for travel, but as the interest in 
the road exists in the communities along the 
route, the work is done and done well. 

Evidence of highway betterment is to be 
observed all across Wyoming. No terrors to 
the motorist are presented in Utah where the 
desert country is first encountered. Though 
not as yet completed the Goodyear cut-off 
across the lower arm of the Great Salt Lake 
Desert is open for travel and offers a ma- 
terial saving in mileage eliminating what has 
heretofore been the worst section of the 
Lincoln Highway between the two coasts. 

At various points in Nevada road work is 
under construction, much of this being 
directly financed through the Lincoln High- 
way Association with funds contributed for 
this purpose to assist where local means are 
in no sense adequate. 

California'-s boulevards are the delightful 
promise at the end of the transcontinental 
run. 

Not only actual road improvement is to be 
observed on the trip across the Lincoln High- 
way. Though such work is of course of first 
importance, featured with it is to be noted 
the great improvement resulting from stand- 
ard bridge construction and further the com- 
munity improvement resulting from beautifi- 
cation, improved hotel and garage service 
and other marked indications of advance- 
ment. 

To those who have made this great 3200 
mile drive, the panoramic picture ever re- 
mains fresh and inspiring. The Lincoln 
Highway carries those who travel it through 
the heart of America; every stopping point 




L. E. PENNIMAN 

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA DISTRIBUTOR OF 

Ensign Carburetors 

605 VAN NESS AVENUE 
Near Turk St. San Francisco 

PHONE PROSPECT 5610 



August 21, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



is the location of an historic event in the 
past, every mile of the road is America at 
its best today. 

The highway traverses the industrial 
centers of the East; the richest producing 
area of the Middle West and the scenic para- 
dise and playgrounds of the West. 



A most efficient lubricant is "Oildag," 
manufactured by the Acheson Oildag com- 
pany, whose Pacific Coast agents are Fred 
Ward and Son, 170 First street, this city. 
This new oil is recognized as an ideal gas 
engine lubricant, and for this reason has won 
high favor in the automobile, motorcycle, 
motor boat, aeroplane and commercial car 
field. It eliminates carbon troubles, it is 
unaffected by temperature, its effects are 
saving in oil, and as the use continues, it 
will build up the irregularities of the metal 
parts, establishing a film or veneer that will 
render the surfaces highly polished. In the 
case of gas engine units, this creates a better 
fit between the piston rings and cylinders. 
This increases the compression and affords 
more power from a given quantity of gas or 
gasoline. 



In conjunction with the National Traffic 
Officers convention to be held in this city, 
August 23 to 27, there will be a meeting of 
the northern division of the California Auto- 
mobile Trade Association, according to an 
announcement yesterday from State Secre- 
tary Robert W. Martland's office. 

Martland has stressed the importance of a 
large and representative attendance at this 
meeting of the trade association, in view of 
the importance of the matters being brought 
up before the traffic officers convention. It 
is understood that the association has several 
recommendations along the line of proposed 
changes in traffic regulation to submit to the 
larger body. 

The Automobile Association meetings will 
last for two days, August 23 and 24, after 
which they will merge with the larger con- 
vention. As is the customary plan, their 
first day will be devoted to craft meetings 
and the second to the general meeting. 

As a special feature the delegates will 
gather at the Ferry building at 9 o'clock a. 
m. on August 23 and will march in pro- 
cession up Market street to the Exposition 
Auditorium where the convention is to be 
held. The gathering will close with a ban- 
quet, speeches entertainment and dancing. 



ART NOTES 

There has been a great deal of interest 
manifested in the mid-summer exhibition at 
Del Monte gallery. 

The large marine by Armin Hansen, en- 
titled the "Salmon Trawlers," is a striking 
note on the walls of the gallery, as is also 
his "Men of the Sea," one of the most dis- 
tinguished canvases yet painted by a Cali- 
fornia artist. This picture, if not sold, will 
go East for exhibition. His "Salmon 
Trawlers" was one of the notable pictures in 
the spring exhibition of the National 
Academy, New York. Afterward it was on 
exhibition at the Chicago Institute. 

Hanson Puthoff's two pictures "Indolent 
June" and "Scintillating Light" show this 
artist at his highest mood in subjects which 
delight him — stupendous mountain ranges 
veiled in silvery mists — and again, he paints 
high rugged peaks bathed in the radiance of 
sunshine. His picture "Indolent June" won 
much admiration for the artist during the 
past year's exhibition of the Pennsylvania 
Academy where it was shown for the first 
time. 



— There are many garages in town and the 
motorist is often in a quandary as to where 
to go, especially for permanent service. 
There are very few who give you the quality 
of service of Dow & Green, on Taylor street. 
between O'Farrell and Geary. Here your car 
will receive something more than the "once 
over," and the prices are moderate. 



BUILDING ACTIVITY ON POWELL ST. 

A realty firm which has been very busy 
lately is the A. C. Blumenthal Company, 
which has just consummated a deal for the 
General Candy Stores Company, which will 
build a three-story reinforced concrete struc- 
ture on Post street, between Powell and 
Stockton, at a cost of $100,000. with fur- 
nishings at a cost of $150,000. 

The above lease is an additional site to the 
place now being altered on Powell street, 
between Eddy and Ellis, which was leased 
from the Pope Estate Company, through the 
Union Trust Company, and this site has been 
increased through the additional lease of the 
Continental hotel, to an era of 52 feet front 
by 100 feet depth, to run for a period of ten 
years, at a total rental of $54,000. Both 
transactions were closed by Blumenthal. 



LAUNCHING OF FIRST DIESEL ENGINE 
TANKER 

The Union Construction company of Oak- 
land recently launched the 2200-ton oil 
tanker Charlie Watson, built for the 
Standard Oil company, the first ship to be 
constructed in the Oakland yards by private 
contract since the organization of the 
company. 

All the machinery and electrical equip- 
ment were made on the Pacific Coast. The 
engines are a product of the Skandia 
Pacific Oil Company of Oakland. This vessel 
is the first Diesel engine tanker ever built 
here for the Standard Oil Company, and the 
first vessel of that type to be launched since 
the signing of the armistice. 

The fact that the Union Construction 
Company has been able to secure such a 
large amount of work places the yard among 
the permanent assets of the east bay, and 
eliminates it definitely from the war industry 
classification. 



A SPELL BINDER IN THE LAUNDRY 
BUSINESS 

A man who can invest in most poetic and 
flowery language as prosaic a matter as the 
Thirty-seventh Annual Convention of the 
Laundry Owners National Association, and 
Allied Industries, is certainly a person who is 
going to attain heights in the advertising 
field. Such a m.in is ITiomas F. Alford. of 
the Publicity Committee, in the above 
ciation. who can poetize over a trip to Cali- 
fornia, glory in the "majestic hills and can- 
yons, lakes, rivers and trees, the sublimity of 
God's handiwork." instead of telling the 
laundry men of Now York how many Chinese 
wash-houses we have here in California' 



A NEW FORM OF INSURANCE 

It will pay you, business or professional 
man, to investigate the new form of insur- 
ance which Mr. F. A. Stearns, manager of 
the Accident Department, Shreve building, 
will be pleased to explain to you. A small 
annual payment will insure you an income of 
a thousand dollars a month, in case you break 
down, and are unable to work. The contract 
is non-cancellable by the company, and 
covers every form of mental or physical dis- 
ability; it is issued like life insurance, on 
medical examination. 

This company is fifty-two years old, with 
assets of more than fifty million dollars. 



One half the profiteers don't know how 
the other half profits. — Life. 



USE 

Associated Products 

"More Miles to the Gallon" 



Associated Oil Company 



Sharon BUg. 



San Francisco 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Sti. 
Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without 
dining in the finest cafe in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner $1-75 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 21, 1920 




LOOKING A PLAIN SITUATION SQUARE 
IN THE FACE 
By Annie Laurie 

(From San Francisco Examiner April 8, 1920) 

[Editor's Note: Mayor Rolph, in a letter 
to Judge Henry M. Owens, on the later *s 
resignation from the office of Judge of the 
Police Court, which office he filled during the 
absence of Mr. Sylvester J. McAtee, con- 
gratulates Judge Owens upon the highly 
officient manner in which he conducted the 
business of this department. The following 
tribute from Annie Laurie shows more vividly 
that Judge Owens is a broad-minded humani- 
tarian above all things, in his dealings with 
men and women. The citizens of San Fran- 
cisco will have a chance to place this just 
Judge in the Superior Court, at the primary 
election, August 31, 1920.] 

Police Judge Owens 
please step to the plat- 
form and get a Distin- 
guished Service Medal 
pinned to your coat. 

Talk about the Croix 
de Guerre — if ever a 
man went over the top 
in the face of an age- 
long and bitterly vindict- 
ive enemy you have 
done that very thing, and 
done it right here in San 
Francisco, this very 
week of this very month 
of this very year. 
You have looked a perfectly plain situation square 
in its plain, hideously revolting face — instead of 
turning your head away, and pretending that you 
didn't see it. Or, if you did see it, you didn't 
know what it meant. 

When you announced in open court the other day 
that hereafter men arrested in vice raids are to be 
held for examination, just as the women arrested in 
such raids are held, you turned the great white light 
of every day commonsense upon an outrageous and 
absolutely ridiculous situation. 
oOo 
What if two lepers were found walking down 
the gangplank of some trans-Pacific steamer, when 
the ship docked here in San Francisco? 

Would the health authorities arrest the woman 
leper, and let the man leper go free? Not if any 
man or woman who can read and write knew about 
it. No, thank you. 

Leprosy is just as hard to bear, just as hideous 
an affliction whether it is brought into a country or 
into a community or into a family by a man or by 
a woman. 

We're not talking morals or reform — we're not 
even talking "double standards" or "single stand- 
ards." We're just talking plain facts. And it's 
about lime we did. Of all the stupid, blind, deaf 
and dumb, feeble-minded things in human experi- 
ence, this ridiculous way of shutting up one source 
of infection and letting the other step out absolutely 
free to endanger the health of the whole com- 
munity, is and has been the most appallingly 
incredible. 

oOo 
And the worst of it is that they set loose the 
more dangerous one of the two. Women of that 
class do not as a rule go home to innocent children 
and decent, self-respecting husbands. Men caught 
in such raids do sometimes go home to innocent 
children and honest, helpless, trusting wives. 

Why disinfect the dining-room with so much pains 
and scientific attention to detail and let the typhoid 
carrier stay in the kitchen and cook all the meals 
for you? Isn't it just about time that we civilized 
men and women of the twentieth century stopped 
letting old-fashioned customs and old-fashioned ideas 



stand in the way of absolutely plain, simple, com- 
monsense ways of dealing with great human and 
national problems? 

I don't care whether Judge Owens believes in the 
"double standard" or the "single standard." It does 
not worry me in the least to wonder whether he is 
interested in the cubists or in the new music or in 
temperamental dancing. I don't care whether he 
likes roast beef rare or well done, and I don't think 



it is my affair to care. But I do care when he has 
the courage and the commonsense to say from the 
bench something which should have been said from 
the bench and shouted from the housetops and 
insisted upon at every Board of Health meeting 
since there has been such a thing as a Board of 
Health in existence on earth. 

More power to you. Judge Owens. You're a 
Daniel come to judgment. 



YOUR CLIENTS 

are sure to hear, sooner or later, about the New Policy which the 
Pacific Mutual originated and recently perfected. 

It would be a matter of good business for you to tell them yourself 
inslead of waiting for your competitor to do so. 

The NON-CANCELLABLE DISABILITY INCOME 
POLICY is the last word in complete protection againsl eveiy disability 

$1000 A MONTH FOR $200 A YEAR 




WRITE FOR COMPLETE INFORMATION 

F. A. STEARNS, Manager Accident Department 

SHREVE BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
THE 

Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 



ASSETS OVER $2.50000,0 



INCORPORATED 1826 



OF NEW BRUNSWICK, NEW JERSEY 

WWU& Al» AOTOMOSDLE DNSUlRANCffi 

"Ninety-four Years of Service" 



Pacific Department 

266 Bush St. 



Wm. W. Alverson 

Manager 



Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 



CAPITAL $3,000,000 
FIRE 



AUTOMOBILE 



ASSETS $22,500,000 
MARINE 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Go. in America" 

FIRE AUTOMOBILE WINDSTORM 



TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



REASONABLE RATES 



Graney's Billiard Parlor 



Finest in the World 
Perfect Ventilation 
924 Market Street 
61 Eddy Street 



EDDIE GRANEY, Proprietor 



t& Casa del Rey 

is a million dollar fire-proof hotel, on 
the sunny bathing beach at Santa 
Cruz. It offers the advantages of 
tennis, golf, motoring, fishing and 
swimming, and is the center of Santa 
Cruz social life. 

MORRIS & WARNER, Piops. 



IHI©ft©H St Mfflftfew 



217 Second Avenue, San Mateo 
SPECIAL SUNDAY DINNER $1.00 
MEALS A LA CARTE 

Special attention paid to banquets, automobile 
parties and tourists. The only firsl-class a la 
carte restaurant in San Mateo. The hotel is 
entirely new; hot and cold water in every room. 
All well lighted. Rooms with private bath. 
Prices moderate. Summer rates given. Elevator 
service. 



EPPLER'S 

BAKERY and LUNCH 

886 Geary Street 



Branch Confectionery 

SLTTER and POWELL STREETS 

Phone Douglas 1912 



The Cecil Hotel 

of San Francisco offers 
the perfect combination 
of home and hotel life. 
Cuisine excellent. Lux- 
ury of billiard, card and 
reading rooms. 

Mrs. O. E. MORRIS. Proprietor. 



J. B. Pou J. Bergcz C. Lalannc 

L. Coutard C. Mailhebuau 

BERGEZFRANKS 

Old POODLE-DOG Co. 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

Music and Entertainment Every E\ening 

415-421 Bush St., San Francisco 

(Above Kearny) Exchange. Doug. 2411 



THE 'DERNER CRP IN ENTERTAINMENT 

Possibly you have seen one of the many 
cartoons by Briggs. entitled: "Someone is 
always taking the joy out of life," but from 
recent indications there is at least one place 
where the aforementioned joy may be re- 
placed in large and generous quantities. 
Techau Tavern, always thronged with 
laughter crowds, wreathed in perpetual 
smiles, dancing to the hypnotizing music of 
the Techau Tavern Dance Orchestra, or mid 
the slanting beams of the spotlight 'neath a 
dazzling splendor of color, a Revue disports, 
dispensing the topical catch of the moment 
in a galaxy of color, pretty artists, gowned 
in creations of the modiste's latest designs. 
Dancing, gliding over an oval floor with the 
smoothness of unconscious effort, the guests 
find unending pleasure for it is never too hot 
or too cold, thanks to the dispensation of 
modern science applied to the newest 
methods of ventilation. And the menus — 
Epicurean Delights designed by the master 
hand of artists of cuisine. After the theatre 
every dance is a lucky dance and the Satur- 
day afternoon tea dansants are an ever in- 
creasing attraction. 



F. A. LEACH, JR., GETS PROMOTION 
AS P. G. & E. OFFICIAL 

Frrnk A. Leach, Jr., who has been the 
manager of the Oakland office of the Pacific 
Gas and Electric company, has been ap- 
pointed assistant general manager ol that 
corporation, it became known today. 

Leach has been connected with the cor- 
poration for twenty-two years and has been 
the manager of the local office for sixteen 
years. He was the third president of the 
Oakland Chamber of Commerce after it was 
reorganized from the old Board of Trade 
in 1909. He also served on the board of 
directors of that organization for fourteen 
years. 



A SCHEME THAT FAILED 

Two young women entered a car and 
found only standing room. One of them 
whispered to her companion: "I'm going to 
get a seat from one of these men." She 
sailed down on a sedate looking man. and 
boldly opened fire: "My dear Mr. Green, 
how delighted I r.m to meet you! You are 
almost a stranger. Will I accept your seat> 
Well. I do feel tiled. I heartily admit. Thank 
you so much." The sedate gentleman, a 
total stranger, of course, looked, listened, 
then quietly arose and gave her his seat, 
saying: "Sit down. Jane, my girl. Don't 
often see you out on a washing day. lou 
must feel tired. I am sure. How's your 
mistress?" The young lady got her seat, 
but lost her vivacity. — The Observer. 



AUTOMOBILE STARTING AND 
LIGHTING SYSTEMS 

Give satisfactory results when given proper at- 
tention. We specialize on Electrical equipment, 
storage batteries, etc., and guarantee satisfaction. 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

Brand h Cushman 
955 Post St. Phone Prospect 7-tl 



AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE 
EXCLUSIVELY 

Union Indemnity Exchange 

of California 

Better Rates Quicker Service 



American National Bank Building 
Telephone Sutler 2645— Sutter 2646 



Want a Better Position? 

Bell Syllabic Shorthand in Six Weeks. 

Bell Touch Typewriting in Six Weeks. 

Our Complete Stenographic or "Dictaphone" 
Course in about Two Months. 

If you wish to prepare in ONE-FOURTH 
■he lime and at ONE-FOURTH the cost. EN- 
ROLL NOW. 

One of our courses makes an ideal Holiday 
Foi the wife, son or daughter, and PROTECTS 
I 1 II 1 . IR future for all time. Individual instruc- 
tion. Day and Evening. 

Investigation costs you nothing, and may save 
regret. 

THE SYLLABIC INSTITUTE 

"The 6 Weeks' Business School." 

376 Suilcr Street. (Douglas 4316) 
! RANCISCO. CALIF. 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

INSURANCE BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Fhcne Kcamy 391 San Frcncisco 



Wedding Presort*: The choicest < 
to select from rl Manh's. vntn >i tw 
| -[ Post -" ' Po* 




N w CORN EM 

POLK >ra POST STS. 



When Summer Smiles, Remember Winter's Frown 

The prudent man looks beyond his immediate wants 
and lays by a store of necessary things for future use. 

He lets no opportunity go by to provide ahead for 
the future comfort and -welfare of his family. 

His forethought is rewarded not alone in comfort 
realized, but in money saved through timely buying. 

Builders, Look to the Future Now 

Summer favors your building operations and offers 
the golden time in which to prepare for winter needs. 

That new house, begun or contemplated, will not 
afford the comfort you anticipate if not heated 
properly. 

The best time to install a heating plant is during 
building construction, when it can be done with a 
minimum of labor and expense. 

Let us help you plan the heating installation and lay 
out the preliminary work that can be most eco- 
nomically done NOW. 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company 

445 Sutter Street San Francisco District San Francisco, Cal. 



SUNSHINE SERVICE CO. 

HIGHWAY AND 12TH AVE., SAN MATEO. 

Auto repairing, painting, top and curtain work, and upholstering. A full and com- 
plete line of automobile accessories at city prices. All our work guaranteed. Day and 
night service. All work done by competent mechanics. Give us a trial and be convinced. 
Distributors and service for Exide batteries. Phone San Mateo 33. 




^^^^^^m 



Quality 

TIRE SHOP 

Expert Tire and 
Tube Repairers 

Q uality Retreading 



MARSHALL SQUARE 
VULCANIZING CO. 

10 Marshall Square 

Hi* SI. kk Hirhtl 
Phone Market 3837 






CLINTON CAFETERIA 



136 O'FARRELL STREET 
Opposite Orpheum Theater 



Continuous Serving from 7 A. M. lo 8 P. M.— Music. Lunch and Dinner Orchestral and Vocal 



750 Bus 
345 Bus 

Repair 
Largest 


U. S. GARAGE 
h St. Phone Garfield 713 


PEARSON GARAGE 

h St. Phone Douglas 2120 
Shop and Annex 350 Bush St. 


and Most Complete Garages in 
the West 




i&vMimmatotttttxztt,. 



SATURDAY, AUGUST 28, 1920 



tr 



Autumn 

in 

California's 
High S 



lerra 



= ^ 



Air that invigorates 

Balmy days, coolest of nights and mornings 
Surroundings of wildest grandeur 
Finest of sport and outdoor life 

Yosemite — 

Lake Tahoe — 

Sequoia and Gen. Grant Parks — 

Kings and Kern Rivers Canyons — 

Huntington Lake — 

Shasta Region 

Comfortable Hotels— Well Equipped Camps 
Trail Riding— Mountain Climbing— Fishing— Hunting 

Reduced round trip season tickets on sale daily. Still lower round trip fares Friday and Saturday*— return limit 

fifteen days. 

For illustrated folder, "Outdoor Life in the Sierra*," or "Outing Retort*" booklet, write Cha*. S. Fee, Pa**. Traf. Mgr. 

65 Market St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Southern Pacific Lines 



V 



J 



Telephone Sutter 6654 



Importers 



GEO. W. GASWELL GO. 

COFFEE AND TEA 

Spices, Baking Powder, Flavoring 

Extracts 

442-452 Second Street,. San Francisco 



For that stubborn cough 
Use Old Snake Doctor's Cough Remedy 

SNAKE DRUG CO. 

Formerly G. Leipnitz & Co. 

Now Located al 

127-129 KEARNY ST. 



MacRORIE - McLAREN CO. 

FLORISTS. NURSERYMEN 
and 

'.NDSCAPE ENGINEERS 

141 Powell Street, San Francisco 

Nurseries: San Mateo 

Phone San Mateo 1002 

; Phone Douglas 4946 and Palace Hotel 



A. W. BEST 



ALICE BEST 



BEST'S 

ART SCHOOL 

1625 California Street 

Life Classes — Day and Night 

Illustrating Sketching Painting 






TIRES VULCANIZING 

THOMAS H. ELK1NGT0N 

Distributor for 

Kelly-Springfield Tires 

Long Mileage Tires and Second Hand Tires 

865 POST ST.. Near Hyde 

Phone PROSPECT 1566 




FIREPROOF 

STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1636 Market St 

Bet. Franklin and Gough 
Tel. Park 271 San Francisco 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital „.. 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of Pro- 
prietors 



Aggregate Assets. 30th 
Sept. 1919 




$ 23.828.500.00 
16.375.000.00 

23.828.500.00 



$377,721,211.00 



SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E., General Manager 

351 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian Slates, New Zealand, Fiji, Papua (New 

Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australian Banking 

Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

Head Office: London Office: 

GEORGE STREET. SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 2 

Agents : 
Bank of California, National Assn.. Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bank, Crocker Nal'l Bank 



-THE CANADIAN RANK OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO. CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Rese.ve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 

STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and at LONDON. ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE. 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Manager W. J. COULTHARD. Assistant Manager 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 



SAVINGS 



COMMERCIAL 



526 California St., San Francico, Cal. 
Member of the Federal Reserve System 
Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH ..Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement and 7th Avenue 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30. 1920 

Assets $66,840,376.95 Capital Actually Paid Up $ 1.000.000.00 

Deposits 63.352,269.17 Reserve and Contingent Funds 2.488.107.78 

Employees' Pension Fund $330,951.36 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK. President 

GEO. TOURNY. Vice-Pres. and Manager A. H. R. SCHMIDT. Vice-Pres. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE. Vice-President A. H. MULLER. Secretary 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE. Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN. Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL, Assistant Cashier 

G. A. BELCHER, Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN. Assistant Cashier 

C W. HEYER. Manager Mission Branch W. C. HEYER. Manager Park-Presidio Dist. Branch 

O. F. PAULSEN. Manager Haight Street Branch 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JOHN A. BUCK E. T. KRUSE I. N. WALTER A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY A. H. R. SCHMIDT HUGH GOODFELLOW E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. A. CHRISTENSON ROBERT DOLLAR L. S. SHERMAN 

GOODFELLOW. EELLS. MOORE & ORRICK. General Attorneys 



THE ANGLO & LONDON PARIS NATIONAL BANK 
BOND DEPARTMENT 

Recommends the purchase of Sutter Basin Company Bonds. 

The Security is exceptional — a first mortgage on 55,000 acres of the famous Sacramento 
Djlta, every acre under profitable cultivation; and the Unconditional Guarantee of 
Mr. J. Ogden Armour of Chicago, endorsed on the back of every bond. 
8 Per Cent. Interest 
The Term of the loan will suit every requirement. One may invest for any length ol time 

from three years to nine years. 
The Amount may be $100, which will return $8.00 a year; $500, which will return $40.00 
a year; or $1,000, which will return $80.00 a year. 

Complete information on request. Phone, write or call. 

Sutter and Sansome Streets Phone Kearny 5600 

San Francisco, California 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856. 

SAN F££NClftCfi 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. XCVIII. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, SATURDAY, AUGUST 28, 1920 



No. 8 



The suffrage fight in Tennessee is apparently ending 

snarl of "red tape." 



All the candidates for all the offices are sure of nomination 

at the primaries! 



That University "free love" couple are finding out that two 

cannot live on love, even when it's "free." 



-Have you noticed the frequency of authors with German 



names, in the Bolshevik publications? 



Luis Salazar, who succeeded Esteban Cantu as governor of 

Lower California, pleads for an "honest" press. Poor man, did he 
never hear of Diogenese? 



Expose your limbs, dear girls, and wear transparent waists, 

but on no account be guilty of the immodesty of showing your ears, 
even if they are like the ears of heroines in fiction — "rosy shells." 



America is ahead again this year in the Olympian sports 

held in Finland. We have shown Europe what we can do in the 
grim game of war, or the pleasureable one of sports. 



Why not create a "third party" of women, and put up a 

member of the fair sex for president? That's an idea for you! 
Certainly men have made a mess of the world as it exists today! 



Italy looks upon the Soviet government as a sort of war time 

expediency, to judge from her opinion that this form of govern- 
ment cannot continue to exist following the restoration of peace in 
Russia. 



Mexican robbers use hypnotism, putting their victims in a 

trance, while they ransack the house. There have been "spell 
binders" in these United States for many years, in big and little 
business, and many a victim has wakened out of his trance, to find 
too late that his savings have vanished. 



President de la Huerta must belong to the species of long- 
haired reformers! He has just ordered gambling stopped in Mexico 
City. This last piece of news coming fast on the surrender of Villa 
and Cantu, shows a strange reactionary feeling against the wild life 
in our Southern City. 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA 
ADVERTISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott, 259 Minna Street, near Fourth, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Kearny 720. Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post Office as second- 
class mail matter. 

London Office: George Street &s Company, 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year $2.50. Foreign: One 
year $5.00; Canada, one year. $3.50. 



-Celestino Gasca, 



governor of the Federal District, which 
comprises Mexico City, is trying to abolish his own office, contending 
that his work is not necessary, since the City Council is well able 
to handle municipal affairs of the capital. American holders of 
superfluous offices in the city and State, please take notice! 



That fine of $250 against the Italian who fired a ranch near 

Boulder Creek, is a very inadequate punishment for an incendiary. 
The outcome of incendiarism, and also, of highway robbery, may be 
as bad as murder, and severe penalties should be instituted for both 
these crimes. 



Climb the heights of Twin Peaks some day, when the air is 

clear, and only a blue haze, like an azure chiffon veil is hanging 
over the seven hills of San Francisco, and throwing purple shadows 
in its valleys. Breathe in the breath of old ocean, look down upon 
the roof-tops of your town, and get a perspective of your life and 
its purposes. 



Americans in the vicinity of the Anatolian hills, where a fight 

is raging between the British-Greek soldiers and the Turks, seem to 
view the battle as if it was something staged for their amusement. 
"Two American institutions on the Bosphorus. commanded an 
excellent view of the struggle, and were safely out of the range of 
the Nationalists' bullets," says the news item. 



The scandalous condition of the transport "Sheridan," is a 

disgrace to the United States Naval department. The exigencies of 
war might possibly be distorted into an excuse for these conditions, 
but when the country is at peace, and in a prosperous state, the 
criminal negligence on the part of the officers of the vessel, should 
be summarily dealt with. 



Flowers that bud and bloom, and wither and drop from their 

stems, without being plucked to bring some message of cheer to the 
sick soul, are as pathetic as lives that have budded and flowered in 
vain. It facillates the strength of a plant to keep its blooms cut, 
and the gorgeous blossoms in the conservatory at the park, and in 
the beds and gardens in the city and suburbs, should be gathered 
and sent to hospitals or poverty stricken homes, where they would 
lighten weary hours. Flowers are like beautiful thoughts, and should 
be scattered broadcast. 



Weird manifestations of healing are said to be evinced in a 

house in Tipperary. Ireland, the scene of the recent murder of Police 
Inspector Wilson. The item says that "all the statues and holy 
pictures began to bleed, at a certain hour. A soldier with a smashed 
leg. and a little girl victim of tuberculosis, were miraculously cured." 
It is this universal characteristic of religious superstition which 
impedes the Emerald Isle in her fight toward independence as a 
nation. A state must be founded on a sound basis of stability and 
practical common sense to endure. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 28, 1920 



Editorial 



Next Tuesday, the 31st of August, will decide 
All Classes whether we, as a State, appreciate one of our finest 

for Shortridge statesmen. That we do not appreciate our litera- 
teurs, our artists, our musicians, is a sad, but 
accepted truth; election day will show whether or not we fail, as 
criterions regarding the administration of our political affairs in 
Washington. 

Samuel Shortridge, candidate for United States senator, should 
receive the unanimous vote of the fair sex, for he was one of the 
first advocates in this State of the enfranchisement of women, and 
for thirty years' constant campaigning in the Republican party, he 
has consistently tried to impress the rank and file with the justice ol 
granting women the full rights of American citizenship. 

Two more Los Angeles women's organizations have endorsed 
Samuel M. Shortridge, Republican candidate for United States 
senator, whose campaign is meeting with widespread support in 
Southern California. 

Shortridge is the senatorial choice of the Woman's Republican 
Club of the Thirty-seventh Assembly district. Endorsement of the 
candidate was signed by Mrs. Louise A. Brunnig, president, and Fay 
F. Stoddard, secretary, following a rousing meeting there. 

A similar endorsement was voted by the Woman's Republican 
Club of the Thirty-fourth Senatorial district, the officers of which 
are Mrs. Sterrett Ford, president; Miss Florence Burr, corresponding 
secretary; Mrs. Robert Hancock, secretary, and Mrs. Eugene Burr, 
treasurer. 

Captains of industry and agricultural men should give their 
allegiance to Shortridge. He is solid on the tariff question, and 
believes that all of our industries, particularly our citrus industry, 
need adequate protection. 

Shortridge combines practical political sense and patriotism with 
Idealism. He upholds the government of Washington and Lincoln, 
and pays a tribute to "the brave boys who fought for it, and by their 
valor added new glory to the flag of the Republic." The soldier 
vote should be strong for Shortridge. He does not believe in 
"entangling alliances." 

All Republicans of California should support Shortridge. He has 
been unswerving in his loyalty. While others doubted and were 
halting, he went forward, giving of his time, his means and his 
splendid talents, without limit. 

He should be upheld by men of sterling private character, because, 
although he has been in the political limelight for over thirty years, 
there has never been occasion for the crooked finger of scandal to 
be pointed at him, and his opponents in the political field have never 
been able, throughout his long public and private career, to invest 
him with a single questionable deed. 

I he rank and file should uphold him, because above all things, he 
is a humanitarian! Vote for Shortridge! 



We are living in a most contradictory and 
A Contradictory Age inconsistent age! Never has brutality been 

so rampant as during the last six years; 
never have there been so many diabolical contrivances for the 
torturing and killing of human beings, nor so many wonderful 
surgical operations for the patching up of the human body. Never 
have we, as American citizens, been so domineered over, so sup- 
pressed, so rigidly made to toe the mark, to think as we are told, 
like a huge family of mischievous children, who "must be seen, and 
not heard." And yet. never have there been so many great voices 
crying for freedom, all over the globe! 

The United States went to war to save democracy for the world. 



at a time when we were in the grip of the most autocratic adminis- 
tration that America has ever experienced! Never has capital, 
coining new fortunes from the suffering of humanity, been so greedy, 
and still, never have captains of industry made so many concessions, 
not only in wages, but in voluntarily using thoughtful consideration 
for the comfort of their employees! 

"We have taken unto ourselves wings," but the present genera- 
tion is described by churchmen and other reformers, as the most 
materialistic, and extravagant in the history of Christianity. 

Prohibition rules (so we are told), and yet statistics show that 
drunkenness is on the increase, and not the decrease; women are 
showing their independence by taking off all the clothes they dare, 
and shortening their skirts to their knees, and yet never have we 
seen less "ogling" by men on the streets. 

To come down to provincial business, the present administration 
of municipal affairs has been the most costly in the city's archives; 
never has the poor, long-suffering public been taxed so excessively, 
and yet never has the city been in so neglected and filthy a condi- 
tion. The manufacture of wine is unlawful, and still the vineyardists 
of the State are reaping a rich harvest from "wine grapes!" 

In summing it up, we can only repeat the words of Dickens, in 
his masterpiece "The Tale of Two Cities," which no doubt, have 
applied to all ages in the past, and will apply to all ages in the 
future: "It was the worst of times, it was the best of times; it was 
the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness." 



Oh, there's a lady in our town, 
A Charlatan And she is wondrous wise! 

At least, she would have us think she is. She tells 
us that she is, and in a manner so frank and naive that it is almost 
childish in its unabashed effrontery. The subject of these few 
remarks is a visitor claiming New York City as her home port, but 
whose speech is branded with the rusty iron of the uncultivated 
parts of the State of Maine. She has a meagre vocabulary, half of 
which she does not know how to pronounce, and she talks for hours 
on end. What does she talk about? Well, she has an inexhaustible 
line of chatter which is supposed to convince you that she is a 
human analyst. With all her appalling ignorance the woman is 
clever. She is so glib that she keeps even the least impressionable 
of her listeners awake; they are hoping against hope that soon she 
will say something. She is so monumentally commonplace that she 
has the mediocre mind buffaloed from the start, and it is of that 
type of intelligence that her large following is made up; the pathetic 
ergerness of the masses of people who are not accustomed to think- 
ing for themselves and regard her flashy platitudes as brilliant reve- 
lations, is the real secret of her success. Success? Well, wouldn't 
you call it success if you were able to talk a thousand people into 
taking a "course" at twenty-five dollars a person? We'll say you 
would! We were present at the opening lecture of this remarkable 
charlatan. The very word — charlatan! A most fitting word. It 
means a person who chatters, prattles, talks much and loud; prates 
in his own favor and makes unwarrantable pretensions; a quack, a 
mountebank. Now we have this lady classified, labeled, held up to 
ihe public view. We have been wondering wearily ever since that 
evening when we sat for two or three or four hours and listened to 
her till we thought our mind was gettting seasick, why no attention 
has been given to her and her astonishing antics. Surely there are 
some people in San Francisco whose sense of humor, if nothing 
else, will save the city from being gulled to the extent of a thousand 
of its precious souls sitting at the feet of this humbug? Of course, 
the few hundred dollars worth of advertising in the daily mess, — 
I mean to say our daily press, — effectively paralyzes the pens of any 
newspaper writers who have observed the case (the maudlin moan- 
ings of a sob sister do not count), but there are others who should 
be roused; there are pens that should be dipped and dipped deep 
into the rich ink of honest scorn, then raised and raised high in the 



August 28. 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



air of sane thinking, and swung hard with the strong arm of 
denunciation. Out upon you, fie upon you (these must shout) 
bold-faced ignoramus! You shall not go on to the next town and in 
your flaming robes prance up and down a platform telling your new 
dupes how many San Franciscans you roped with your cheap 
chatter, at twenty-five dollars per- citizen. 

What this person has done is this: She has taken the book of 
M. 0. Stanton, entitled "The Encyclopedia of Face and Form 
Reading. Showing Personal Traits, Both Physical and Mental," 
published in Philadelphia by the F. A. Davis Company, and 
proceeded to pilfer from its pages a few of the superficial truisms, 
adapt them to her ready tongue, and then solemnly deliver her 
wonderful "discovery" to the half-baked portions of the communities 
she visits. And the way she gets away with it! I daresay that many 
of her pupils can at least read. Why not, then, go to Haeckel, 
Herbert Spencer, Cousins, Fowler, Lavater. Lewes, Maudsley, and a 
dozen other who have written learnedly on this subject in which 
some of the greatest minds have been interested? "All is symbolic 
in Nature. Form is not form only; it unfolds something inward." 
Now, does not a statement like that appeal to the reasoning intellect 
a thousand times more strongly than ridiculous ramblings of an 
illiterate imposter. 



We heave a great sigh of relief, for we have 
Commerce Reports had part of our burden taken from our backs! 
(we have been commanded to use the pronoun 
'we" in stead of "I," although we insist that this form is antiquated; 
so please, dear reader, if we ever have occasion to say "We stamp 
our feet," or "we shake our heads," do not think that we are a 
hydra-headed centipede; we are quite normal, with the usual 
number of heads and limbs) ; we heave a sigh of relief, we say. 
For many weeks, numerous and sundry bulletins have fallen upon 
our desk, like autumn leaves. They have to do with the big business 
of the world, — stocks, bonds, commerce reports, agricultural news, 
mining, shipping. They have fallen faster and faster since we have 
taken up the great and complicated job of trying to make a 
confirmed weekly stronger. And we, who know nothing of finance, 
who have never traveled outside our own beloved State, who never 
have had more than 39 cents in our pockets at one time, tear off 
the covers of these bulletins feverishly, and glance wildly at the 
contents: 

"Papyrus, which grows in great abundance in the Belgian Kongo 
(the Kongo was in Africa in our school days) principally along the 
lower Lualaba, near the lakes of Kabuli, Sjemba. Kisali and Neaga, 
is to be exploited by a large company, which has been granted a 
concession." — Well, those words are a mouthful, but if this trans- 
action does not make note-paper cheaper in San Francisco, what's 
the use of bothering to remember them? 

"With the coming of June, the sponge fishing season opens in 
Tunisian Coastal waters, for the summer campaign (that last word 
has a familiar sound just now), lasting until October." Personally, 
we consider sponges very unsanitary, and much prefer good crash 
wash cloths. 

"The Hungarian Chamber of Commerce for Switzerland was 
formed at Zurich, on July 8. 1920. It has 355 founding members, 
and is under the direction of Mr. Dyonis de Laskay. a former Austro- 
Hungarian Consular officer in St. Gall. The Chamber's offices are 
at Loewanstrasse 16. Zurich." We are not very conversant regarding 
Hungarian things; we do like Hungarian music, though, and Hun- 
garian Goulash is a very good dish. 

"A cablegram from Consul General W. S. Hollis. at London, dated 
August 13. 1920. stales that the British embargo on the following 
products, has been removed: husk meal, offal of corn. bran, 
middlings, mill dust and screenings, pollard and sharps." Isn't it 
just like England to take off the embargo on old stuff like this, 
which nobody wants? 

"The area planted in sugar in the Philippines in 1920. is estimated 



by the Bureau of Commerce and Industry and by planters and 
manufacturers, to be about 550,000 acres, a 20 per cent increase 
over last year." What does this matter to us, when we are still 
paying 25 cents per pound for this saccharine substance, which we 
are sure is mixed with sand, or something, because it takes twice 
the amount that it used to, to sweeten anything now! 

We stare at the headlines, which seem to look up at us reproach- 
fully, as if to say: "Why don't you make use of us in some way, 
Mrs. Editor? All good editors should write learned discourses on the 
subjects in our pages. We can't help suspecting that you're not half 
as bright as you assume to be! Do you know anything at all about 
the rubber market in Paraguay? Or the number of importers in 
Funchal, Madeira? Or about the seven Prefectures of Aichi, Fukin, 
Gifu, Ishikawa, Shiga, Toyana, Shizuoka, in Yokkaichi, Japan? 
Ah, ha, we thought not! Aren't you laying down on your job as 
editor. Madam? Do you realize what an ignoramus you are, not to 
know all about these things?" 

We bundle up the closely printed pages guiltily; we feel almost 
like traitors to our country, when we think that the poor Government 
has gone to the expense of ceaselessly sending this instructive matter 
in to us, and we have not printed a paragraph upon it! We think: 
"We must speak about the levying of a naturalization tax of 3 per 
cent on all unregistered foreign securities, in the French Chamber of 
Deputies, on May 27, 1920," and then another bunch of bulletins 
falls upon us, and we exclaim — "Mercy! that item is out of date 
by now!" Still they come, and after a while, we have a fantastic 
picture of ourselves being flooded over, and snowed under, by these 
grimly inevitable reports, like the babes in the woods, covered with 
leaves! 

But we have found a way out! No more do we greet these pages 
with a sinking heart! We have come across a good Samaritan, to 
whom we are soon going to deliver our heavy pack, and he will 
weed out what he wants, and enlarge upon the interesting items, and 
generally absorb into his masculine brain a great deal of literature, 
and emit it again, properly digested, for the benefit of our patient 
subscribers. 



There is so little home life in San Francisco. So 
Living In many of you writer people and artist people and 

Your Trunk business people, detached and semi-detached, are 

perching on the bare limbs of the "to-rent-furnished" 
quarters, eating your meals here, there and everywhere, believing 
that you are saving time and thought by so doing, when as a matter 
of fact you are wasting much of the first, expending an undue 
amount of the second, and destroying utterly your manners and your 
digestion : besides boring your acquaintances with your tales of 
portions, prices and places. Go on with it. continue then to stick 
your paper up against the ketchup bottle and twist your legs round 
the chair and wipe your knife and fork with the napkin before using 
them! It is such an independent way of living and leaves all that 
extra time for your work, while no disturbing intervals for the 
common civilities of existence occur. Or. perhaps you dine at your 
club? In that case you do have to drop an occasional good-evening- 
how-are-you. unless you get there early and secure the table in the 
corner with your back to the room. It may be that you live in an 
apartment alone, with an excrescent appendage known as a 
kitchenette? Well, friends, all joshing aside, we who know not 
home, are missing one of the sweetest and most sweetening things in 
life. I mean the kind that has a real mother in it. and beautiful 
restful furniture: a place where there is order and comfort and 
peace and a good cook; where a spirit of friendliness is established 
and an abounding interest in one another's affairs flourishes. Little 
loving sacrifices are made and accepted. Pictures and a piano and 
lots of books, fresh air. open fires, shaded lights, quiet voices, 
laughter, sympathy — all of these go to make up the happy home. 
I have just spent an evening in such an one and I feel like a stray 
cat, read* to howl with homesickness. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 28, 1920 



— u a 



Once upon a time, a certain distinguished clergyman, resident 

a great many miles from San Francisco, accidentally left behind him 
his manuscript o! a sermon recently delivered. On the first two 
pages was written a list of the various churches in which the same 
sermon had been successfully delivered during its life of just eight 
years, and of the actual dates of delivery. As was clearly indicated 
by the very numerous corrections, erasures and interlineations, there 
had been at least five separate and distinct progressions in the 
original breadth of view. His subject was represented by the one 
brief word, "Charity;" and the sermon had finally developed into an 
interesting evidence of one of the distinctive elements making up the 
acceptable personality of the man, viz., his habitual readiness to 
study, acknowledge, adopt and publicly use the best of each year's 
newest thought. This is suggestive of the thought that personality 
is not the expression nor the equivalent of earnest enthusiasm, but 
that it is the very field of the cloth of gold, rich as a foundation, 
and richer in the prizes which it may produce in the tournament 
of life. 



— — The Soviet form of government, born during the first year 
of the Russian revolution, without pride of ancestry or hope of 
posterity, will be of short life, as it has been full of trouble. Though 
young in years it is already decadent and unsteady on its pedal 
extremities, being inebriated with the exhuberance of its verbosity. 
Given to dreams and hallucinations, its production is sterile, unfruit- 
ful, in fecund, and leaves a dark brown taste; has a tendency to 
enlarge on the unreal, and disdains to hew to the line; is principally 
noted for evolving a looseness of words and a constipation of facts. 
Its early demise is predicted, animation now being suspended. Over 
its remains, when finally laid to rest in the Potters' Field of Misfits 
should be erected a monument with this inscription: "That which 
was, is no more. That which was, was nothing." 



"The Appendicitis Club" has been formed at Kalamazoo, 

Mich., for protection against that much dreaded bodily ailment, with 
a present membership of 700. A fund has been accumulated by 
means of regular dues and occasional assessments, which fund may 
be drawn upon for cost of medical and surgical treatment of any 
member afflicted in respect to that useless and bothersome part in 
his midst, known as the vermiform appendix. The club might be 
thought to be the offspring of some joker's imagination, but it has 
actually been organized and is now doing business. Whatever fate 
may ultimately befall it, one incidental result is pretty sure to 
happen, there will be a notable increase in cases of appendicitis and 
a corresponding decrease in those vulgarly diagnosed as plain 
bellyache. 



When the business sky was blotted by the rain clouds, thick 

and black, and every sort of trouble seemed to join to hold you 
back — did you not in solemn earnest in your inmost soul conclude, 
you would make a mighty hustle — when the times got good? Now 
the money is a-moving, and the fields are getting white, and there's 
always "something doin' " if you grab the chance aright. And you 
need not lose a minute, if you're diligent and shrewd — just jump in 
and make your fortune, for the times are good. 



It is no secret that in the East, and in fact the whole country, 

the accumulations of the savings in the banks largely belong to 
women. The average woman in her limited sphere is as good a 
financier as the lord of creation. And her native proclivities for 
saving in a small way are even more times strongly developed. 
Women for years have been forcing themselves into all the avenues 
of independent and self reliant avocations. They invade every 
department of clerical employment, and many of them reach 
important executive positions. With the causes that bring about this 
changed condition I have nothing to do, but there can be no doubt 
that having either from choice or necessity changed social and 
economic conditions, women's struggle in the world has brought her 
into contact with the methods and manners of men and that she has 
profited by the experience. So long as she broiled the matutinal 
steak and wielded only the maternal slipper it was held that the 
husband's and father's part was not only to provide for the present, 
but to safeguard the future. Only when she threw away the apron, 
the needle and the frying pan, and invaded with her fetching smiles 
and deft fingers the seats occupied by the sterner sex, was it thought 
necessary to give her the ballot and consider her a part of the body 
politic. The advance of the one will be found to keep step with 
the march of the other. 



R. H. Birdshaw, of San Jose, "at the suggestion of a friend," 

exhausts himself and me by a letter of inquiry regarding a wonder- 
ful proposition which has been put up to him whereby he is to attain 
title to a $265 diamond by an initial payment of $85. By what 
devious course of reasoning the gentleman convinces himself that 
he has a claim on me for my good offices I am at a loss to know. 
The News Letter long since discontinued the practice of preaching 
to fools, if for no other reason than that the salary of the office is 
loo small and difficult of collection. In these short cuts to wealth 
a class of ignorant people are imposed upon by the artful and 
mercenary. A clever set of lazy, vagabondish men are making a 
living out of the credulity of the simple minded who permit them- 
selves to be imposed upon by the unscrupulous devices of tricky 
minds. But in these progressive days one should not be permitted 
the luxury of credulity without paying for it. 



-Once upon a time, a bright young fellow, who as a boy 



wasn't afraid to chew tobacco before his teacher and who was born 
of honest parents of the unmanicured variety, found himself broke 
on the streets of a great city. Upon asking a friend, whom he 
chanced to meet, for assistance, he proudly refused the offer of a 
silver dollar and said in a manner most majestic: "No; if at this 
stage of my career I permit myself to be satisfied with small things 
I will be nipping ambition in the bud and always remain a nobody. 
I must have a million dollars by tomorrow at 4 o'clock." When his 
friend, both looking and expressing displeasure, turned away, the 
young man wisely thought three consecutive times and then pro- 
ceeded to enter the practice of the law. Samuel M. Shortridge has 
not the million dollars yet — but he is running for the United States 
Senate and will be elected this fall. 



"When," said Samuel Shortridge, "I stood up on the rostrum 

at Los Angeles and listened to the extravagant elogiums of the 
gentleman who introduced me, I wondered if the expression which 
I endeavored to assume for the occasion in any way resembled the 
god-like cast of countenance of Judge A. of Arizona. No one can 
look into the face of Judge A. without at once setting him down as 
a magistrate of profoundest learning, and he is admired and revered 
by all who know him. A cowboy, however, upon seeing the judge 
for the first time, at once denounced him as a 'd — d old hypocrite,' 
and upon being indignantly expostulated with, stubbornly adhered 
to his original opinion, giving as a reason : "No man can possibly be 
as wise as that man looks. 



August 28. 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



THE MAN OR THE MONKEY ? 

By Eleanore Farrand Ross. 



W//////////////////^^^^^^^ 



■ ■■■-■• ■■■-' ~~ 



No one except the servants knew that Bruce Sterling kept a pet 
baboon in his tumble-down old mansion on the stark outskirts of the 
city; for the servants, like the monkey, were well trained and 
Sterling was very wealthy. For the matter of that, no one, even of 
his most intimate friends, were aware of the existence of said 
mansion. 

Bruce Sterling occupied an apartment on "Nob Hill." He was as 
ugly as his pet of the suburbs, blessed with ordinary brains, a talent 
for theatricals, good-natured as a rule, but a man who never forgot 
or forgave an insult or an injury. He dabbled in law (the profession 
in which his father had made his millions) and his great wealth 
would have thrown a glamour over him in the eyes of "society" had 
he the nature of a hedge hog. 

In his younger days he had been violently in love with Geraldine 
Ashley, but Gerry had dismissed him in short order. Afterward, 
her cruel remark to a mutual friend, that "she abominated monkeys," 
came to Bruce's ears. For Miss Ashley was one of those unfortunate 
girls who sacrifice friendship and good manners for the sake of some- 
thing to sharpen their wit upon. 

This experience was Bruce's one and only love affair. Not that 
he became a woman hater; he simply appeared to lose interest in 
women, although he still kept up with the social swim. 

Now. Miss Ashley, though sometimes as sharp as an adder's sting 
in her remarks, had once or twice lapsed into a too passionate 
expression of love in her letters to a certain friend who, fortunately 
or unfortunately, was already burdened with a help-mate, and these 
letters, after the affair had waxed and waned, became such a night- 
mare to the girl that she began to lose appetite and sleep, and as a 
consequence, some of her youthful beauty. 

In a moment of mixed emotions, in which desperation, remorse 
and a feeling of confidence in Bruce Sterling as her father's chief 
adviser, all played a part. — she told of her indiscretion to the lover 
whom she had treated so brutally. 

Biuce was sympathetic and quite assured that with very little 
trouble these letters would soon be in his possession. "You know 
Meredith is a great friend of mine." he said, soothingly. "In fact, 
I may say I once saved his reputation, if not his life." He smiled 
strangely. "1 may convince him that he owes me something aside 
from mere money." The two had been sitting behind the usual 
conventional palms, watching their acquaintances gyrate over the 
floor in the modern atrocities called "dancing," and a friendly and 
benign atmosphere appeared to envelope them. Gerry had curbed 
her usually acid tongue and Bruce had been his pleasantly enter- 
taining self. No one. looking upon them, could have suspected the 
worried condition of the girl's mind, or the bitter feelings in the 
man't heart. They were, apparently, just two friends chatting 
amicably. 

But as Bruce gave his promise of assistance, the girl, who had 
been holding her fan over her lips, dropped it impulsively and 
grasped his hand. "Bruce, you are a prince!" she ejaculated. 
"What can I do to repay you?" Bruce smiled again, squeezed her 
hand lightly and then dropped it. "When the time comes." he said 
pleasantly, still as if their discussion was of the weather and its 
inconsistencies, "will you do exactly as I ask you?" 

Gerry stared. "Of course. That goes without asking. But why 
the melodrama, my friend?" 

****** 

Where the road turns from the bay toward the hills, in the 
southern outskirts of the city, it is lined with stark, stiffly standing 



eucalyptus trees. The wind sweeps in almost without ceasing from 
the western side of the peninsula, and the sound in their branches 
is like the sound of the sea. In spring the scene is fair enough; the 
hills green, and in some places aflame with poppies, yellow with 
buttercups, azure with lupine and lavender with sweet wild iris. The 
wind is modulated; just a soft sigh now and then, the bay is blue 
and when the tide is high, the smell of the sea is fresh and bracing. 
One looks from the windows of the train and thinks: "Why, this 
isn't such an ugly spot, after all. It might be quite jolly for a 
vacation, just to live in some little shack on the hills here and have 
a boat and go rowing and fishing. Must be full of game in season. 
Ihink I'll inquire about land around here, by Jove!" 

And then the trip is made again in late autumn, and again one 
looks from the windows of the train and shudders, and is glad to 
reach the noisy, dirty, bustling, ugly, indifferent old city. For the 
scene in autumn is a very different scene. We see it when the tide 
is out, and the mud flats lie bare and evil-smelling, and the hills are 
burned brown and are naked of any shrub, and the sea fog drives 
in, and smothers the stark eucalyptus trees, and the voice of the sea 
moans and wails in their branches! 

In a canyon between these desolate hills, back from the road, 
surrounded by sighing trees, apart from any other place of abode, 
and guarded by a high fence picketed with spikes, stands an old 
ramshackle mansion, showing signs of an old-time elegance, and 
breathing forth that utter loneliness which come to a habitation 
which has known popularity and the laughter and chatter of crowds, 
and now stands deserted. Its blinds are always drawn and its 
windows have the look of eyes with half closed lids, eyes thai say: 
"There is so much that I could tell you; I might ruin some fair and 
high-sounding names if I would; great schemes and intrigues have 
been born within me. and have gone out into the world and 
destroyed men; strange things have I seen in my day. I have — 
perhaps — winked at murders .... There is so much that I 
could tell you." 

* * * * * * 

The brilliancy of the Mardi Gras ball was at its height in the gayly 
decorated halls of the St Francis hotel, when the Beast sauntered in. 
H here was a rather shocked silence and then a burst of applause as 
he came forward in his baboon skin, made obeisance to the Queen 
of the evening, and then mingled with the marked throng, seemingly 
seeking some person, with bright twinkling eyes that searched the 
crowds piercingly. Paying no attention to the jibes and questions 
thrown at him. except now and then lo utter a guttural protest, he 
wandered in and out among the guests still intent on his quest. 

"Chappie is overdoing it. don't you think? " asked a jovial monk, 
after receiving a rough push and growl as the only answer to a 
pleasant remark. 

"Yes. even to the smell." assented his companion, sniffing dis- 
gustedly. For. in truth, that indefinable but distinct wild-animal 
odor came to the nostrils of those who lingered in the baboon's 
vicinity. 

Gradually, however, the interest he had created waned and he was 
left comparatively speaking, to his own devices. 

When presently, a masker in a chauffeur's suit, approached a 
young woman in the costume of a flower girl, handed her (covertly) 
a note, and passed into the hotel lobby followed by the baboon and 
the recipient of the note, the volatile merry-makers only paused for 
the second, lo speculate cynically on this realistic revival of "Beauty 
(Continued on Page I I ) 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 28. 1920 




ociot 




■"5^5- 



News has come from the East of the an- 
nouncement of the engagement of Miss Lani 
Sewell of Bath. Maine, to John Winslow 
Williams of Baltimore. The tidings were 
told at a luncheon given at the home of 
Mrs. Harold Sewell, mother of the bride- 
elect, in Cape Small Point, Maine, where 
they are passing the summer. Relatives of 
the bride-elect in California are Mrs. Nor- 
man McLaren and Miss Elizabeth Ashe, as 
Mrs. Sewell was Miss Millie Ashe of San 
Francisco. Williams is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Winslow Williams of Baltimore. Md.. 
and a graduate of Yale. 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Brooke and Miss 
Cecile Brooke have returned from a visit of 
several months on the Atlantic coast and 
are at their apartments in the Fairmont. 
John Brooke, jr., who has been attending 
college in the East, returned to California 
with his parents and sister. 

Colonel Robert McMillan has arrived at 
his new station at Mobile, Ala. Mrs. Mc- 
Millan, prior to her departure to join her 
husband, is visiting her father. Judge T. Z. 
Blakeman. at the Hotel St. Francis. 

A delightful affair of next month will be 
the garden fete which Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
N. Stetson will give at their home in Bur- 
lingame for the benefit of the American 
Academy in Rome. Saturday evening, Sep- 
tember 18, has been chosen as the date for 
this event. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jean de St. Cyr were hosts 
at a handsomely appointed dinner, Sunday 
evening, at their home in El Cerrito, where 
they entertained seventeen guests. Covers 
were placed for Mr. and Mrs. Shaffer 
Howard, Mr. and Mrs. George Cameron, Mr. 
and Mrs. Joseph Oliver Tobin, Mr. and Mrs. 
Rennie Pierre Schwerin. Mr. and Mrs. 
George Howard, Mrs. William Hinckley 
Taylor, Mrs. George Harding of Philadel- 
phia. Mrs. James Ward Keeney, Robert 
Burroughs of New York, Campbell Stewart 
of New York, a house guest of the De St. 
Cyrs, and the hosts. 

Mrs. John Johns has gone to Santa Bar- 
bara, where she is to enjoy a visit of several 
weeks as the guest of Dr. and Mrs. Henry 
Pritchett, who are in California on their an- 
nual visit from New York. Mrs. Johns will 
return to her home in San Mateo the first 
of next month. 

In honor of Miss Juanita Ghirardelli, 
bride-elect of Harry Magee, Miss Lorna 
Williamson was a luncheon hostess Monday 



in this city. Monday Miss Williamson enter- 
tained for Miss Ann Wetherbee, an eastern 
visitor who is her house guest. 

The Misses Betty and Elena Folger were 
house guests of Mrs. John A. McNear at her 
country place on the Russian river over the 
past week-end. 

Mrs. George S. Bryan, wife of Com- 
mander Bryan, navigator of the U. S. S. 
Idaho, is in town and is a guest at the Cecil. 

Mrs. George U. Hind was hostess at tea 
Tuesday afternoon at her home in San 
Rafael in honor of the Misses Katharine and 
Laura Branston. The home was charm- 
ingly decorated for the occasion with 
hydrangeas and delphinium from the Marin 
gardens. Society from Ross, San Rafael 
and Mill Valley motored to the Hind home 
to greet the Misses Branston. Receiving with 
the hostess were: Mesdames Christine 
Brooks, George Adams Martin, Aimer New- 
hall, Robert Harrison, Eric Ord, Miss Alice 
Carr. 

Tallant Tubbs, who is passing the sum- 
mer season at the Hotel Arlington in Santa 
Barbara, was host at luncheon last Sunday 
at the Santa Barbara Country club, compli- 
menting Miss Geraldine Graham, and her 
fiance, Whitney Warren, Jr., of New York. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold de Ropp, who are 
visiting Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Trimble in the 
South, were also honored guests. 

Mrs. Walter H. Seymour, who makes her 
home at the Palace hotel, presided at 
luncheon in the Palm court in honor of her 
sister, Mrs. Clarence L. Six, of Stockton, 
who is visiting her other sister. Miss Anne, 
Peters, at the Fairmont. 

Mrs. John Rounsefell, who is occupying 
the Alpha Phi sororiety house on the Stan- 
ford campus during the summer, entertained 
on Tuesday at a charming bridge luncheon. 

Miss Josephine Moore entertained week- 
end guests at her charming summer home in 
the Santa Cruz mountains last Saturday and 
Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Madson. 
who have taken possession of their new 
home on Jackson street, were the guests of 
Miss Moore as were Miss Dorothy Crawford 
and Vincent Butler. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Washington Dodge 
(Florence Bandman) have been entertaining 
as their house guests the Misses Natalie and 
Elyse Robert, who are visiting in California 
from their home on Park avenue in New 
York. 

Miss Beatrice Clifton and Drury Tallant, 



son of Mrs. Frederick H. Tallant, were mar- 
ried last week in Oakland and are passing 
their honeymoon in the south. The news of 
the marriage comes as a surprise to the 
friends of the young couple on both sides 
of the bay. The bride is a graduate of one 
of the local private schools. Tallant is the 
grandson of Mr. and Mrs. John Landers and 
a brother of Mrs. Pearl Landers Whitney 
and a cousin of the Misses Elizabeth Anne 
and Beryl Whitney. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Barr McCutcheon of 
New York have purchased a home site at 
Pebble Beach adjoining the William W. 
Crocker place. Mr. and Mrs. McCutcheon 
have been visiting in Del Monte for the past 
month and have been extensively entertained 
during that time. 

Miss Ellita Adams, the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Edson Adams, who is planning to 
leave in the near future for the Atlantic 
coast, entertained at luncheon several days 
ago at the Woman's Athletic Club. Those 
in the party were: Misses Mary Julia 
Crocker. Elizabeth Watt. Margaret Buckbee, 
Mary Emma Flood, Catherine Bentley. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ezra Thomas Stimson have 
just returned from an extended motor trip 
through the Northwest and Yellowstone 
Park. 

Following an extended visit in the North 
Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Vandcrbilt, Jr., are 
expected to arrive in San Francisco during 
the earily part of September. Mrs. Vander- 




August 28, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



bilt prior to her marriage a few months ago 
was Miss Rachel Littleton of New York. 

Upon a visit to his mother, Mrs. Arthur 
Lord, Andre Lord of Paris has arrived in the 
city for the first time since his departure for 
Paris two years ago, to enter business. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Judd Ryan, who 
have been visiting in Australia since last 
November, have returned, bringing with 
them as their guest Mrs. Hubert Lee-Steere, 
a prominent member of the social world of 
Melbourne. The visitor is the daughter of 
Sir James Lee-Steere and will be extensively 
entertained prior to her departure on Tues- 
day, when she will sail on the Ventura 
for her home in Australia. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Clinton La Mon- 
tagne, who have taken an attractive place 
in Palo Alto for the summer, entertained 
Monday evening with a barbecue in the hills 
of Woodside. The party • motored into the 
hills to enjoy the moonlight supper. 

Mrs. Lawrence Webster Fox, Jr., who has 
been passing the summer at an attractive 
country place in Ross, assembled a group of 
friends at luncheon last Friday afternoon at 
the Fairmont hotel. The affair was given 
in honor of Mrs. L. Webster Fox. mother-in- 
law of the hostesses. 

Major and Mrs. Frank Andrea of Port- 
land, Ore., who are visiting in California, are 
being entertained by their friends in Santa 
Barbara. Mrs. Ajidrea was Miss Georgiana 
Leadbetter of Santa Barbara and Portland. 
Mrs. Hancock Banning of Santa Barbara, 
who motored north and is a guest of Mrs. 
Irving Wright at her home on Van Ness 
avenue, was the guest of honor at a 
luncheon given last Friday afternoon in the 
Grey room of the Fairmont hotel. Mrs. 
James H. Bull was hostess. 

Major and Mrs. Henry T. Burgin. U. S. 
A., have left Fort Mason for Fort Leaven- 
worth, Kans., where Major Burgin will be 
stationed. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alan Cline will leave in the 
near future (or the East, where they will 
make their home. 

Judge and Mis. Curtis Lindley have as 
their guest at their home on Pacific a\cnue 
then daughter, Mrs. Vernon Reed of Salt 
Lake City. Before her marriage last Feb- 
ruary Mrs. Reed was Miss Josephine Lindley. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry H. Scott gave a 
bridge party on Saturday night at their home 
in Pacific Grove. Among their guests were: 
Messrs. ami Mt -dames George Nickel, S. F. 
B. Morse. Francis McComas. J. F. Neville. 
Arthur Hill Vincent, Roger Lapham. W. L. 
La Boyteaux: Meadamea A I- Cheney of 
Los Angeles. Arthur Goodfellow: Messis. \\ 
II. Crocker, Byington Ford. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Hudnut arrived 
from the East Monday and are at the Fair- 
mont hotel, where they will make their home 
until the apartment is finished that is being 
built by Mis Hudnut and Mis. R. A. Brown- 



<■■-•■■■■-■ -• :■ ■■•'•.■■: ' •■:■■•--•■ ■■•■- ■'■•- •■'■■■. 7~~- 



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PROMPTNESS SHOULD BE FIRST JUDICIAL DUTY 



One of the most important duties which the citizens of San Francisco 
will have to perform at the coming election will be the election of eight 
Superior Court Judges. 

In making selections for these places it would be well to remember the 
criticisms that have recently been made concerning our courts. One of 
these criticisms is concerning delays in getting decisions after a suit is 
brought. The other is with reference to juries selected to try cases. 

One of the serious causes of delay is the fact that many of the judges 
dispose of a small calendar in the forenoon and then disappear for the rest 
of the day. As a result one visiting the City Hall in the afternoon would 
rarely find more than three or four of the thirteen departments busy or the 
judges at their court rooms. 

The criticism of the character of the juries is made possible because 
of the failure of the judges to take a personal interest in the selection of 
those who compose them. If they do take any interest it is to get certain 
friends or political workers an opportunity to earn a few dollars. 

All of this can be easily remedied if the people would exercise a little 
caution in the selection of the judges. Men should be elected who are 
known to be industrious and who would give faithful, conscientious service, 
men who would so arrange the work of their departments thai they would 
be occupied with the transaction of court business as they would expect to 
be if employed by a business concern. 

Men should be elected whose character and reputation would give 
some guaranty that they would personally see to the selection of jurors 
and scrutinize carefully the names allowed to go into the box from which 
the panels are drawn and be guided solely by the fitness of such person to 
serve. In other words it may all be summed up by saying that only those 
who are known to be honest and industrious should be elected. Vote for 
no man for judge whom you would not be willing to employ in the 
transaction of your own private business, feeling that your life, liberty and 
property interests would be safely cared for. 

"-■ ■ - ■""'•»"""'"'0r>- 



% 7,-/»,VMM /MiM>.".MM";"':-""». ' ..■■ - 



lee in California street. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hudnut will spend a portion of the year at 
the apartments and the remainder in New 
York. Mrs. Hudnut was formerly Mrs. 
Edgar de Wolfe of this city. 

Mrs. Harvey recently has been visiting 
with Mrs. Gertrude Atherton who is at Holly- 
wood while her novel. "The Tower of Ivory." 
is being arranged for the screen. Mrs. Oscar 
Coo>>er also has been with her mother and 
Mis Atherton in the South. 

Miss Constance Harh was a dinner hostess 
Thursday evening at her home in California 
street. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hill Vincent and 
Miss (Catherine Ramsey were the guests of 
S 1 Morse on ■ deep sea fishing cruise over 
the week-end at Del Monte. 

Mr. Benjamin Freeman and Miss Rose 
Abrahams were united in marriage last Sun- 
day, the 22nd, at seven o'clock, at tl 
Francisco Gymnastic Club Hall, on Sutter 
street. The bride was charmingly gowned in 
white satin, and more than two hundred 
guests sat down to a table groaning with the 
season's luxuries. The happy couple will 
spend their honeymoon in Los Angeles. 



Mr. and Mrs. George Pope and Mr. and 
Mrs. Mosley Taylor have passed the last two 
weeks at Del Monte. 

Mr and Mrs. William Gregory Parrott en- 
tertained a party of the members of the sub- 
debutante set and their escorts at a supper 
in the garden of the Hotel St. Francis 
recently. 



Tin® 
Pa la 



€ 



FOR 



ExdlMW 



Management of 

Hals*ry W. Manwanng 




10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 28, 1920 



Seligmann Tells of 

By Joseph 



Tracing Lynchings 

Anthony 



During the series of race riots and lynch- 
ings in Chicago, Washington, Knoxville, 
Vicksburg, and other cities, that stirred the 
country recently, there was one man who 
traveled in the wake of the disturbance in 
each community, silently observing and gath- 
ering facts. The man is Herbert J. Selig- 
mann, a veteran newspaper man and the 
f.uthor of "The Negro Faces America." The 
story of his undertaking is an unusual one. 

"It was with no idea of publishing a book 
that my attention was first attracted to the 
Negro question," declared Mr. Seligmann. 
"One of my assignments as a reporter in 
New York not very long ago happened to 
be to an amusement park in the Bronx, 
where something of a local controversy had 
been started by the exclusion of a Negro. I 
was interested in the case as a significant 
human story, and I told the truth as I saw 
it — which was that racial discrimination had 
been carried to the heart of New York, and 
that an issue was to be made of it. My 
paper took the part of the Negro. The case 
was fought out in the courts. 

Atmosphere of Tension 
"In the story I tell you now I am not 
going to name places," continued the author 
of "The Negro Faces America." "In my 
book I told what I saw in the cities where 
the greatest of America's recent race riots 
were staged. It would endanger the lives 
of several men — black and white — to tell 
precisely how I got certain parts of that 
information. But. without mentioning names, 
let me tell you what I saw and heard in one 
southern city where they roasted a Negro 
alive last June. When I got there I could 
feel an atmosphere of tension in the way 
men met and looked at one another on the 
streets. I stiuck up a conversation with 
one of the policemen. 'Oh, yes,' he assured 
me, 'everybody knew there was going to 
be something doing. It looked that way 
for a day or two past. The crowd knew the 
police would not shoot.' 

"I had with me a letter of introduction 
to a certain colored man in the town, given 
me by a northern Negro. I decided to find 
out what the colored man knew about the 
mob murder. I asked a colored citizen 
whether he knew where I might find this 
man. He may have put two and two to- 
gether from the questions I had been asking, 
or his alertness may have been abnormally 
quickened by the events of the last day or 
two. At any rate, he looked at me and 
said, simply, 'Don't go there.' Then he 
proceeded to tell me just why it would be 
unhealthy for any stranger from the North 



to be seen getting inquisitive about the 
lecent Negro burning. 

Burned the Letter 

"But I went to the house of the Negro 
who had been named and presented my 
letter to him. He took the letter, read it, 
and walked with it to an open grate at the 
other end of the room and watched until 
every corner of the writing paper and envel- 
ope was burned to ash. Then he said to me, 
'Go home!' 

"However, I managed to get the story, 
as that Negro was able to tell it — how a 
Negro had been accused of attacking a white 
woman, with the usual lack of proof — how 
the talk had gone about town that a lynch- 
ing was just about due, and how this very 
man talking to me had seen the mob, with 
bloodhounds, go past his door, knowing that 
innocent as he was, if a bloodhound stopped 
at his door he would be taken and tortured 
to death. Then the carnival of horror that 
was seen out in one of the pleasant residen- 
tial streets. In the Negro quarter doors were 
still barred and shutters down on all win- 
dows, white fury now having been quite 
appeased. 

"Not to Northerners" 

"That afternoon I got the view of another 
resident — a white man and a physician. I 
went to him with an ailment specifically de- 
signed for the occasion, and it served the 
purpose. As he was advising me about the 
condition of my health, we got into a 
friendly conversation, and. as I had ex- 
pected, it turned to the recent lynching 
without my making the first move. Yes. 
the doctor said, philosophically, they had 
been having a little excitement in town. 
It seemed that a certain white man had 
been in the habit of visiting a white woman 
— the woman never was any good, he said, 
parentheticallly. But one day things got 
to the point where the woman was con- 
cerned about her reputation, such as it was. 
She gave out that she had been attacked by 



the Negro. He, the doctor, knew that the 
man that had been roasted to death was 
innocent. 

"I don't know whether I did anything to 
show surprise at the calmness with which 
he told this side of the story. At any rate, 
he suddenly shut up like a clam, and looked 
at me appraisingly. The next thing he said 
was, 'You know, we don't discuss these 
things with Northerners here.' 

"It was five o'clock when I left the doc- 
tor's house. My train was due to pull out 
at 10:30. The intervening hours were 
anxious ones. I noticed that several men 
who had been watching me curiously at 
the hotel, were hanging about the station. 
They did not speak to me, but their eyes 
never seemed to leave me for a moment, 
and the crowd was growing. When I finally 
did board my train, without interference, 
and pulled out of town. I saw my colored 
citizen friend again. He told me that he 
had been watching me for hours, ready to 
send a telegram for military help if things 
developed as he had thought they would at 
any moment. 

"There is scarcely any need of going 
further into the repellant details of race riot 
towns as I saw them. I cannot tell you, 
for obvious reasons, how I got my facts in 
some of those places. But half an hour 
after I left a prominent Negro in one town, 
a bullet came flying through his closed 
shutters. In yet another town I found 
every door barred in the Negro quarter, the 
blinds drawn on every window, and determ- 
ined men standing by the doors within. 
They had had wind of the attack before it 
came, and had sent their women and chil- 
dren to an amusement park away from the 
city. They were ready to protect their 
homes. Perhaps that was why in that par- 
ticular case the attack never did come. 

"I am glad that things happened to me 
that piqued my curiosity about America's 
much talked of and little understood race 
problem," concluded the author of "The 
Negro Faces America." "If only the 
curiosity of the great American people could 
be aroused as mine was and they could see 
the things that I saw, the day of a new 
understanding might be near." 



Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

SPECIALIZES IN 

TAR SHAMPOOS 

MR. and MRS. A. F. COSQROVE 

TELEPHONE KEARNY 2842 



August 28, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 



THE MAN OR THE MONKEY? 

(Continued from Page 7) 

and the Beast." The spectacle of a baboon handing in a flower 
girl to a waiting taxi, slamming the door briskly, climbing onto the 
seat with the driver, and whirling away toward Mission street, did 
not cause any unusual commotion among the lookers-on outside 
the caravansary, for on Mardi Gras night the most extraordinary 
things may happen without the upholders of the law even so much 
as ruffling the superb set of their uniforms. 

The girl in the cab leaned back and sighed. This was Sterling's 
melodramatic handling of the simple matter of returning those 
awful letters. Well! Bruce was always theatrical! She would be 
so thankful when they were once in her hands again! 



It was a long ride, and the ghostly gray of dawn had begun to 
slip in among the silent eucalyptus trees surrounding the old 
mansion, when at last the cab drew up at the gate in the high, steel 
picketed fence. This opened by some secret spring, was closed 
again and the taxi whirled up to the door. The Beast jumped out 
awkwardly, helped his companion to alight and walked ahead of her 
up the weather-worn steps of the ramshackle house. Then a hairy 
arm pushed the girl inside, and the portals closed silently. 

The cab vanished into some stables at the rear and only the 
windows of the house, with their half-closed lids, looked out past 
the garden into the highway. 

"Strange things I have seen in my day," they seemed to be saying. 

"I have — perhaps — winked at murders! There is so much that I 
COULD tell you!" 



SUMMONS 

No. 108559 

In the Superior Court of the State of California, 

in and for the City and County of San Francisco. 
Edward Craig, Plaintiff. 

vs. 
Julia Elizabeth Craig, Defendant. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the State 
of California in and for the city and County of San 
Francisco, and the complaint filed in the office of 
the County Clerk of said City and County. 

The People of the State of California send Greet- 
ing to Julia Elizabeth Craig, Defendant. 

You are hereby required to appear in an action 
brought against you by the above-named plaintiff 
in the Superior Court of the State of California, 
in and for the City and County of San Francisco, 
and to answer the Complaint filed therein within ten 
days (exclusive of the day of service) after the 
service on you of this summons, if served within 
the City and County; or if served elsewhere within 
thirty days. 

The said action is brought to obtain a judgment 
and decree of this Court dissolving the bonds of 
matrimony now existing between plaintiff and de- 
fendant, on the ground of defendant's extreme cruelty 
and desertion, also for general relief, as will more 
fully appear in the Complaint on file, to which 
special reference is hereby made. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you 
appear and answer as above required, the said 
Plaintiff will take judgment for any money or 
damages demanded in the complaint as arising upon 
contract or will apply to the Court for any other 
relief demanded in the Complaint. 

Given under my hand and the Seal of the 
Superior Court of the State of California, in and 
for the City and County of San Francisco this 
28th day of July. A. D. 1920. 
(Seal) H. I. MULCREVY. Clerk. 

By L. J. WELCH. Deputy Clerk. 
J. \V. Henderson. 508 Humboldt Bank Bldg.. San 

Francisco, Cal.. Attorney for Plaintiff. 



E. F. HUTTON & CO. 



MEMBERS 



New York Stock Exchange 

490 California St. and St. Francis Holel 
Branch: Del Monte Hotel 

Private Wires 
Coast to Coast 



DR. WM. W. HOAGLAND 

DENTIST 

PERFECT SERVICE INSURES SATISFACTION 

Office,. 908 Market St .Third Floor 
TELEPHONE GARFIELD 835 



MARQUARD'S ALWAYS APPEALING 

The sparkling Extravaganza, "Hello, Cali- 
fornia," is still running at Marquard's. at 
Geary and Mason streets, with an accom- 
paniment of excellent food, which makes a 
visit to this out-of-the-ordinary cafe a most 
appealing experience. There is the usual 
"Continental Style Luncheon," from which 
you may choose one of 26 different dishes. 
This is a sample of the menu served one day 
this week: 

Chicken leg, curry and rice.-. 50c 

Roast loin of veal, carrots 60c 

Corned beef and cabbage 50c 



A RELATIVE OF THE LATE JUDGE 
COFFEY IS CANDIDATE 

There is a relative of the honored Judge 
Coffey of olden days, who is running as can- 
didate for Judge of the Superior Court. 
This is Jeremiah V. Coffey, who was a most 
intimate companion of the late Judge. At- 
torney Coffey is a most capable interpreter 




JERiMIAH V. COFFl V 

of the law, and has keen ideas as to the 
duties of a member of jurisprudence which 
will appeal to the bar. A most irritating 
habit of the ordinary judge is arriving late 
at court, and so delaying the cases on the 
calendar, while the waiting attorneys can 
say nothing Mr. Coffey will be a judge of 



a different sort, believing that promptness 
and attention to the duties at hand, should 
be the first thought of a good judge. 

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE 
STATE OF CALIFORNIA, IN AND FOR 
THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN 
FRANCISCO. 
In the Matter of the Application of SOUTHER 
FREIGHT HANDLING AND STEVEDOR- 
DOR1NG COMPANY for a change of its 
Corporate Name to SOUTHER WARE- 
HOUSE COMPANY. No. 108448. Depi. 16. 
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE WHY AP- 
PLICATION FOR CHANGE OF NAME 
SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED. 

Souther Freight Handling and Stevedoring Com- 
pany, the said corporation, and Kenneth Monteagle 
and A. T. Gibson, a majority of the Directors 
thereof, having filed and presented an application 
that the name of said Souther Freight Handling and 
Stevedoring Company be changed to Souther Ware- 
house Company. 

IT IS HEREBY ORDERED that all persons 
interested in said matter appear before the Superior 
Court of the State of California in and for the City 
and County of San Francisco. Department 16 
thereof, at the City Hall. No. 400 Van Nets 
Avenue, in said City and County on Monday the 
30th day of August. 1920. at the hour of 10 
o'clock A. M., or as soon thereafter as counsel can 
be heard, to show cause why such application for 
change of name should not be granted- 

AND IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that 
notice of said application and of this order be given 
by publication of a copy of this order in The San 
Y ranasco News Letter, a newspaper of general 
circulation, printed and published in the said City 
and County of San Francisco. Slate of California, 
once a week for four successive weeks before said 
hearing. 

Dated this 1U day of July. 1920. 

BERNARD J. FLOOD. 
Judge of the Superior Court. 

ENDORSED 
Filed July 22. 1920. 

H. I. MULCREVY. Clerk. 
By I.. J. WELCH. Deputy Clerk. 
AGLF. «. RIXFORD. 
Attorneys for Applicant. 

14 Nl..nts<~mery Street. San Francisco. Cal. 

Old Hampshire Bond 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Coven 
TKe Standard Paper for Business Stationery. 
"Made a little better than seems necessary." Tne 
typewriter papers are sold in attractive and durable 
boies containing five hundred perfect sheets, plain 
or marginal ruled. Tne manuscript covers are sold 
in similar boxes containing one hundred sheets. 
Order through your printer or stationer, or. if so de- 
sired we will send a sample book showing (he antire 
line. 

BLAKE. M0FF1T & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
37-45 FIRST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 28, 1920 



SALMON DUE FOR ANOTHER BIG RUN 
ON COAST NEXT YEAR 

Captain Lem Johnson, who operates the 
fleet of boats for the Del Monte Fishing 
club, is passing out word that the fishermen 
can look for a very good season for salmon 
next year. 

This news is encouraging in that the .past 
season has been a very poor one for the 
salmon catch. Just why the run of salmon 
has been so light has been a mystery to the 
many parties who have been going out in 
quest of these prized denisons of the deep. 

Captain Johnson steps forward with the 
explanation that it has been his experience 
in his years of observation that the record 
run of salmon takes place every four years 
and preceding this year the run was very 
light. Next year, Johnson says, will come 
the fourth year. 

The veteran fisherman further explains 
that the extensive cannery operations in 
Alaska and the presence of so many motor 
boats have possibly accounted in a measure 
for the scarcity of salmon. But in the main 
he believes it is simply a case of the salmon 
following a leader and making a run to coast 
points. 

Monterey and Carmel Bays are recognized 
as the finest fishing grounds to be found any 
place. It is especially a great port for 
salmon and the claim has been made that 
more salmon are taken on hook and line at 
Monterey than any other point on the Coast. 

Stanford University maintains a Marine 
Research Bureau on the Monterey Peninsula. 
The currents of the North and South Pacific 
meet off this Peninsula and this is held re- 
sponsible for the great variety of fish to be 
found. Species of the Northern waters as 
well as the Southern waters are taken. 

With the promised run of salmon next 
year the Del Monte Fishing Club members 
plan to enlarge their fishing operations. 
Some of the members are having new fishing 
cialt constructed and plans also call for the 
construction of a boat house in connection 
with the Club House at Stillwater Cove in 
the Pebble Beach district. 



MR. SAMUEL B. STOY PASSES AWAY 

After a long illness, Mr. Samuel B. Stoy, 
of 2305 Scott street, aged 53 years, passed 
away last Sunday night, at the Lane hos- 
pital. Mr. Stoy was prominent in Pacific 
Coast fire insurance circles ever since 1885, 
when he graduated from the St. Augustine 
College at Benicia. He was also chairman 
of the Board of Fire Underwriters of the 
Pacific, and Pacific Coast representative of 
the London & Lancashire Fire Ins. Co., 
Ltd. He is survived by his widow. Mrs. 
Anna Stoy, and two daughters. Miss Monica 
and Miss Eleanor Stoy. 



/ f *r^ ^^Bl 


VOTE FOR 
J. E. 

WHITE 

FOR 

Judge of the Superior Court 

Primary Election, August 31st 



JUDGE BRADLEY V. SARGENT'S 
ELECTION IS INEVITABLE 

Some of the more recent clubs which have 
been formed, among dozens of others, to 
boost the candidacy of Judge Bradley V. 
Sargent, for Judge of the Superior Court of 
San Francisco, are the following: 

Richmond Woman's Club (150 members). 
Bay View Sargent Club, Rough Riders. 
Thirtieth Assembly District Sargent Club, 
Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth Assembly 
Sargent Club, and Polk Street Sargent Club. 

At the beginning of Judge Sargent's cam- 
paign, the following clubs were formed: 

The Lafayette Club, Eureka Valley Club. 
Noe Valley Club, Visitacion Valley Club, 
Presidio Club (composed of 200 business 
men). Sixth Avenue Club, and Richmond 
Club (consisting of army and navy men in 
the service). Surely Judge Sargent holds 
the record so far, in the matter of clubs 
created especially for the furthering of his 
political fortunes, and it is only too certain 
that he will go in with flying colors, on Tues- 
day, August 31 . 

Judge Sargent is a native Californian. the 
father of a war hero, who gave his life at 
Argonne for his country; has practiced law 
in this city for many years, is a graduate of 
Yale college, and is in every way fitted for 
the honor that is inevitably to be his. 




ELECT 
JUDGE BRADLEY V. 

SARGENT 

JUDGE OF THE 

SUPERIOR COURT 

12 YEARS ON SUPERIOR COURT BENCH 



RASPBERRY JAM 

Pickle Manufacturer — People don't want 
tomato seed in ketchup, so we squeeze out 
the seeds. 

Inquisitive friend — And what do you do 
with the seeds? 

Pickle Manufacturer — Put them in rasp- 
berry jam. Makes it look more natural 
like. — Edinburg Scotsman. 



FAIR ENOUGH 

"He's trying her voice." 
"Eh?" 

"Poses as a judge." 

"They ought to try voices with a jury of 
neighbors." — Louisville Courier-Journal. 



DOMESTICITY 

Mrs. Pneurich — What has become of the 
landscape gardener you used to have? 

Mrs. Gotrox — He left me to start a nursery 
of his own. 

Mrs. Pneurich — A nursery Good gra- 
cious. I didn't even know he was married. — 
Judge. 




ELECT... 



JUDGE 



HENRY M. OWENS 

SUPERIOR JUDGE 



August 28, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



Pleasure's Wand 

"IVe Obelj No Wand but Pleasure's" — Tom Moore. 

By "Casu." 



perfect cinematograph day. 

Next week I'm going to see all the others. 



Alcazar 

"Peg 0' My Heart" is delighting Alcazar 
audiences again this week, and Inez Ragan 
is playing her very best part. A more pleas- 
ing Peg than her's none could desire. The 
cast is the same that a month ago gave the 
ever-popular comedy and gave it so well 
that the management had to accede to the 
demand for a revival. 



Columbia 

Maude Fulton is refuting the old saw that 
a man is without honor in his own country. 
Her San Francisco audiences are increas- 
ingly large and enthusiastic. Appreciation 
of her interesting play, "The Humming 
Bird," in which she plays the heroine after 
a fashion all her own, is abundantly ex- 
pressed every evening after every act, and 
that pleasing musical tinkle, tinkle, sweetly 
resounding from the box office, must be an 
accompaniment agreeable to all concerned. 



Orpheum. 

I did want to see those cunning Midgets 
again, so I dropped in at the Orpheum to 
gratify this desire, but it was a bit late and 
the house was sold out. The disappointment 
I expressed was echoed by my companion, 
and as we were about to leave we had a 
bright idea. We took tickets for the balcony, 
and notwithstanding the assurances on the 
program, made our way upward feeling none 
too sure of our judgment. And we stayed 
the whole evening, hearing and seeing per- 
Iccily and enjoying the performance at a 
distance that I do not often take chances on. 
I suppose I shall get the credit of being in 
cahoots with the chap that is constantly 
urging people to try the balcony. Well, I 
don't care, for what he says about it is the 
absolute truth. But, as a matter of fact. I 
am doing this quite off my own bat! 



Some Motion Pictures. 

Well, mes enfants. what do you think I've 
been doing? Enlarging my beat! I went to 
see the movies. Furthermore, I enjoyed 
them very much indeed Beginning with 

die RIALTO I gave myself the pleasure 
of seeing that very good play "Madame X" 
once again. This time filmed and the title 
role played by a great actress. Pauline 
Frederick. The strong emotional drama has 
appealed to a number of renowned actresses, 
each following her own conception of the 
pail which offers a wide scope for a tem- 
peiamcntal artist. Miss Frederick is a beau- 



tiful woman and a highly intelligent one, 
throwing herself into the part she is playing 
with complete abandon and carrying her 
audience with her through the mental agony 
she depicts. A varied and interesting pro- 
gram surrounds this rather sombre French 
piece; the music was excellent and the 
comedy and weekly events I found most di- 
verting. Such charming girls, those ushers, 
in their red and white costumes! And just 
as capable and kind to us as they are nice 
to look it! I left a book under my seat and 
had to return for it, and the nice little thing 
in a red tammie and a bright friendly smile, 
look her flashlight and poked around until 
she found it and managed to restore it to the 
absent-minded owner without embarrassment 
or annoyance to any one. 

"Now, I'm a movie fan," I remarked 
jovially to myself, when I joined the upper 
Market street crowd. "Being which, I must 
do as they all do. and go from one show to 
another, with brief interruptions for meals." 

THE IMPERIAL was my next stop. There 
I saw a fine photoplay telling the story of a 
lad who makes his way from the orphan 
asylum to his big place in the world. Lewis 
Sargent is "The Boy" and Lila Lee. William 
Collier, Jr., Elizabeth Janes are in the 
very able cast. The concert number, con- 
ducted by Severi. was a musical treat. 

A slight pause for refreshment, and I was 
back again on the job. The big attractive 
front of 

THE CALIFORNIA lured me to its hand- 
some and comfortable interior, where I sat 
at my ease on a chair with plenty of room 
for my legs, and watched Jack London's 
wonderful adventure. "The Mutiny of the 
Elsinore" unfold itself on the screen. I was 
lost to the world throughout that perform- 
ance. Mitchell Lewis and Helen Ferguscn 
played the principal parts. I was sorry to 
have to miss the rest of the program, but 
with the zeal of an enthusiast I had to 
move on. 

THE TIVOLI. with pretty, fascinating 
Constance Talmadge ended by orgie. The 
opera house is a very spacious and pleasant 
place to spend a few hours, and the bright 
little play called "The Perfect Woman" was 
full of fun and charming scenes. What a 
lovely girl is Constance! And she has just 
exactly the right kind of a play to show off 
her delightful personality. The orchestra is 
of a high order and the selection "Home. 
Sweet Home, the World Over." was very 
well rendered. Also it served to remind me 
that there's no place like it at the end of a 



The Maitland Players. 

Join hands with me, all congenial spirits, 
and let us do a ring-around-a-rosy! Let us 
jubilate. And let us forget and forgive all 
the wrongs that have been done to us, 
theatrically speaking, for now we are going 
to have something that will take our minds 
off our troubles, and the sky is shining bright 
over our little dramatic world. The clouds 
have broken, and Arthur Maitland is about 
to re-open the Maitland Theatre and with 
his delightful company (enlarged, I hear) 
will give us good plays, just one good play 
after another, all winter. Oh, boy! There's 
nothing unlucky about the thirteenth in this 
coming month of September, if it brings us 
to this oasis in our desert. Unless it be that 
only subscribing members will be there on 
the opening night. Well, there are several 
other evenings in the week after Monday, 
when the proletariat can gain admission, and 
lo, and behold, the poor critic waiting for 
the doors to open on Tuesday p. m. with 
hope in his eye and deep satisfaction in his 
heart. 



ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS 
Alcazar 

"Peg 0' My Heart," given this week with 
even greater success than before — and it is 
abundantly good for further revival — will be 
followed next Sunday matinee by the first 
local staging of "Daddies," the special re- 
lease of which is another proof of David 
Belasco's brotherly love for the popular 
Alcazar. "Daddies" is about a number of 
hard-boiled American bachelors, old college 
mates and men of big affairs, who. at an 
annual reunion, vote to adopt a group of 
foreign war waifs left helpless through the 
horrors of world's conflict. When the chil- 
dren arrive the doubles — and first real joys 
— of their foster fathers begin. A comedy 
of delicious humor it has sudden flashes of 
poignant pathos that bring a lump to the 
throat. The contingent of juvenile players 
is headed by little Sylvia Vaffe. whose amaz- 
ing performance recently in "A Prince There 
Wrs." created a real sensation. 



Orpheum. 

"The Love Shop." a thumbnail musical 
comedy, gifted with plot, players who under- 
stand and beautiful girls elegantly costumed, 
comes to headline the Orpheum bill next 
week with Sunday matinee as its opening 
appearance. "The Love Shop" is reported 
lo possess the requirements astute vaudeville 
patrons insist upon. 

"The Champion." a piece of dramatic 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 28, 1920 




An 'nterlude of fashion. 



brealh of musical come J}/, a glimpse of real plot, ail scl off dji capable players and dancers and a real chorus of beauties, 
is the oulloo k at the Orpheum next B>cefc. for the "Love Shop" is coming. 



value, written in a vein of mingled humor 
and pathos, with Mann Holinger in its cast, 
is another next week Orpheum offering. Sen- 
timent and fun will travel hand in hand 
throughout. 

Lo.vett's Concentration, baffling mystery 
act, is the only hold-over. 

Pretty Marie Gaspar with a natural gift 
for delivery of melodies, will sing her way 
to a welcome. 

Si Jenkins and Victoria Allen will imper- 
sonate "small town wise crackers." George 
Wilson and Ben Larsen will mingle song, 
dance, talk, comedy and acrobatics; San- 
tucci, master accordionist, is another attrac- 
tion in store; the Four American Aces will 
reveal their skill as expert casters. 

Topics of the Day and Orpheum Concert 
Orchestra will open the show. 



THE SPIRIT, IF NOT THE LETTER 

A friend of mine the other day received 
from Grace Rubecon, teacher and social 
worker for several years in the Philippine 
Islands, the following program of a farewell 
entertainment given in her honor by her de- 
voted pupils and co-workers previous to her 
departure for the United States. Who shall 
say that the composer of this announcement 
has not an exquisite sense of the beauty of 
words? And what carping critic is here to 
cavil at the fine disregard for mere rhetori- 
cal construction ? 

PROGRAM 

Farewell Reception to Miss Rubin Kam 

Mr. L. Sequito, Toastmaster. 

Heavenly Music by Filipino Band. 

Mrs. James Rath, 
With smiling face, but grieving at the heart, 
invokes farewell words regarding Miss Rubin 



Kam's departure, hoping to enjoy her 
voyage with merriment while crossing that 
blue, wide and deep ocean. 

Miss F. Leonard, 
Happy as an angel, faces before the many 
friends of the unforgotten Miss Rubin Kam, 
giving short talk about her mutual friendship 
for the loved one. 

Miss Rubin Kam, 
Charming as a beautiful, handsome and fra- 
grant flower, the star of heaven, the Venus 
of the morning, the queen of queens, happily 
addresses among her many friends, giving 
them many, many thanks, being presents of 
her farewell reception tonight. 

Miss U. Findley, 
Miss Rubin Kam's loyal friend, expresses her 
sisterly sentiment, saying, though Miss Rubin 
Kam be gone, but in the deepest of my 
thought and imagination Miss Rubin Kam be 
not absent. 

Miss Hiso, 
In native Filipino language, will speak, giv- 
ing congratulations to the Y. W. C. A., the 
International Institute, the Associated 
Society of Hawaii and the Palama Settle- 
ment, for their human aid among the 
thousands and thousands of foreigner Fili- 
pinos. Also will relate her rapid progress 
from laborer to gentlewoman during her ten 
years existence in the Islands, also short but 
sad farewell word to Miss Rubin Kam. 

Mr. A. Yuson, 
Will apear as "Conjurer" in honor of the 
memorable and unforgetful Miss Rubin 
Kam's departure (with strange music). 



Mr. Ygloria, 
Will draw a picture in ten minutes. 

Mrs. Lorenzo Sequito, 
For ice cream and refreshments. 

Two Steps. 




Alt Next Week— Starting Sunday 

"The Love Shop" 

SI JENKS & VICTORIA ALLEN 
GEORGE WILSON & BEN LARSON 

Lovett's Concentration 
Marie Gaspar 



SANTUCCI 



FOUR AMERICAN ACES 



Topics of the Day 



Concert Orchestra 



'The Champion' 



Mutint-es— 250 to 7. ; ic Eveninirs— i'x* to tl 
i Excvpt Saturdays, Sundays urn! Holidays) 
MATINEE DAILY— plum.. Pouirlns 70 
CONTINUE AVOIDING SCALPERS 

ALCAZAR 

THIS WEEK 

RECORD-BREAKING REVIVAL 

The Play Adorable— "PEG O' MY HEART" 

WEEK COM. SUNDAY MAT.. AUGUST 29 

By Permission of David Belasco, for the First 

Time in the West, the New York and London 

Success 

"DADDIES" 

Delightful Comedy Involving ihe Bachelors' Club 

Thai Adopted Lillle Foreign War Waifs 

NEW ALCAZAR COMPANY 

DUDLEY AYRES INEZ RAGAN 

SOON— First Time in the Wesl 
Rachel Crothers' New York Comedy Delight 

"39 EAST" 

Romance of Youth, Love and Springtime 
Every Evening— Matinees Sun.. Thurs., Sal. 
Holiday Mats. Labor Day and Admission Day 



August 28. 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



FILM FLICKS 

From the Eavesdropper 



Gouveneur Morris, the famous novelist 
whose stories are read by practically every 
member of the American reading public, left 
the Goldwyn studios in Los Angeles this 
week to spend several days in San Francisco. 
He is buried somewhere in ' Chinatown 
gathering local color for "The Water Lily," 
the first story he has written for the screen. 
Many of his stories have been adapted to the 
screen, "The Penalty," pictured by Goldwyn, 
with Lon Chaney, the wonderful cripple in 
"The Miracle Man" as the leading figure 
being the latest. "The Water Lily," how- 
ever, will appear only as motion picture. It 
is probable that another Goldwyn company 
will join the two now making scenes in San 
Francisco (the Will Rogers and the Tom 
Moore companies) although the cast or 
director for "The Water Lily" have not been 
decided upon. 

University of California Extension Di- 
vision last week announced the release of a 
moving picture serial to be issued this fall 
to schools, clubs, and other organizations of 
the State, on the general subject of life and 
living from the scientific point of view. 

"A Microscopical View of the Blood Cir- 
culation" is the title of the first release. It 
was prepared by the Scientific Film Com- 
pany of New York City under the direction 
of Charles F. Herm, formerly staff member 
of the American Museum of Natural History. 

Among the striking illustrations of the flow 
of the blood will be pictured the heart of a 
living chicken, it was stated at the Uni- 
versity. 

Director Leon J. Richardson today de- 
clared that the moving pictures of organic 
life shown on the film are as interesting as 
they are instructing. 

A great laugh was had by the movie 
actors making "Bunty Pulls the Strings" last 
Saturday, which is visiting day at the 
Goldwyn studios. The office boy was show- 
ing a party around, and when they came to 
the set where Director Barker was making 
"Bunty," an outbreak of numerous and 
variously toned sneezes greeted them. 
"Why, the whole company seems to be suf- 
fering from colds in the head," exclaimed 
one of the women. "Oh, no." explained the 
office boy. "they are only practicing with 
their snuff boxes. You see Director Badger 
insists on realism, and the story says that all 
Scotchmen use snuff!" 

Cullen Landis. the clever young chap who 
is featured in the Mary Roberts Rinehart 
picture. "It's a Great Life," has just been 
cast to play in "Bunty Pulls the Strings." 
Cullen didn't get onto the Scotch lingo very 



well at first, and after a rather dragging day, 
Director Clarence Badger said to the young 
actor: "Cullen, bring a little more Scotch 
with you tomorrow," to which Landis re- 
plied: "Sorry I can't accommodate you, but 
I finished the last bottle yesterday!" 

Mabel Normand has just finished "Head 
Over Heels," the play that Mitzi Hajos did 
so cleverly in San Francisco last year. Sev- 
eral innovations were added to the picture, 
among them a trained monkey, and thereby 
hangs a tale. Among the depredations of 
Tony were the consummation of an entire 
frosted cake to be used in one of the 
"Edgar" series (The Booth Tarkington small 
boy tales in which Johnnie Jones and Lucille 
Ricksen are making such a hit), the disap- 
pearance of a pair of imported ear-rings pur- 
chased by Miss Normand a few months ago 
in New York, the maiming of Miss Nor- 
mand's Chow dog, the complete demoraliza- 
tion of a parrot used by Director Badger in 
the Goldwyn picture. "The Evil That Men 
Do." In fact the parrot episode very nearly 
finished Tony's career. There was probably 
the existence of strained relations lasting 
over the jungle days between Tony and the 
parrot. At any rate the quiet of the noon 
lunch hour was broken shrilly last Saturday 
when polly screamed unprintable sea lan- 
guage at Tony, and Tony retaliated with his 
claws. Nothing remains of polly. if the sad 
truth be told, but a bunch of hat trimming, 
and Tony is wearing three bandages upon 
his anatomy. One of the new clauses to be 
inserted in all contracts signed by directors 
in the future is the proviso that they shall 
not introduce to the studio at the same time 
any two or more animals belligerent lo each 
other. 



RELATIVELY 

The man who has relatives appreciates his 
friends. — Judge. 



"A LITTLE BETTER THAN ONE 
EXPECTS" 

This is a slogan that has made many a 
business a world-wide success, and it is one 
of the slogans that underlies the policy of 
management instituted by A. C. Morrisson, 
for the Techau Tavern. One who ha.s the 
wish to partake of a real San Franciscan 
dinner, the kind that the special writers at 
Conventions are wont to describe as being 
the ideal spirit of San Francisco's Epi- 
cureanism, have but to step into the Techau 
Tavern, where masterpieces of the chef's 
art, that would make a Roman gustatorial 
critic envious were he to witness the wonders 
of modern cooking. Over the polished floor 
swings the social life of the city — the dainty 
Ballet of Artists, of whom each member is 
a soloist of merit, enters into the sphere of 
the spotlight, silence reigns. Then the lilt of 
the orchestra, the blending of sweet voices, 
the dashing piquancy of pretty colors, all 
combine to lend a reality- to the slogan that 
this is all "A little better than one expects." 




The keynote of the Willard 
policy is the maintenance of 
a Standard of Quality, in mer- 
chandise, in values presented, 
and in service. 



Willard's 

139-153 Geary Street 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 

PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 
Officei— 505-507— 323 Geary Street 

Phone Douglas 2433 



The New Society Blue Book 

Wishes to announce that they are now making ready for press. 
This book will contain the names and addresses, phones, etc.. of 
the most prominent families in San Francisco. Alameda Co.. 
Marin Co . San A\ateo Co.. etc. Also men and women's clubs of 
high social standing. 

For Reservations and Addresses. Communicate With 

Marguerite M. Pinchard, Publisher 

1659 Maten St. "Phone Franklin 6912 San Ftancixo. Cal. 

Subscription Price SS.00 Per Year 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 28, 1920 



^/toinoijh 




THE WISE GUY 

He was a c af ty driver and he tooled his 

small machine 
With caution and a bit of sense; he worked 

his well known bean. 
"But, Bud," his comrade used to cry, when 

he would slop, "you may 
Proceed at will because, you see, you have 

the right of way!" 
"Oh yes, I know," this wise guy cried, "I had 

the right of way. 
But I can wait; I'm well content to let my 

feet frappe. 
This 'right of way' you speak about is very, 

very nice. 
But someone may not know I have — and 

there I'd be on ice. 
The right of road's a wondrous thing, one 

shoots upon his way. 
Some cross-town guy thinks just like you — 

and there you go— GOOD DAY." 

— Reed Heustis in L. A. Herald. 
3 8 * 
TRAFFIC OFFICERS' CONVENTION 

These are busy days at the Exposition 
Auditorium, for one of the most important 
conventions of the year is now in session in 
that building. The National Traffic Officers 
Association, headed by Lieutenant Dan 
Sylvester of the San Francisco police de- 
partment, is engaged in drawing up a uni- 
form code for traffic regulations to be sub- 
milted for adoption by each of the different 
State Legislatures. 

Since a national law dealing with such 
problems cannot be passed, it is proposed to 
make traffic laws uniform from one end of 
the country to the other through legislation 
by the law-making bodies of every State of 
the Union. 

Much of the work of promulgating this 
code of laws is being handled by the ten 
principal committees of the convention, each 
of which is itself composed of several sub- 
committees. In this way the tremendous 
task of drafting the traffic code can be ac- 
complished in time for the convention as a 
whole to pass upon the results on Friday, 
the closing day. 

These committees are as follows: Arrests 
and Penalties committee. Auto and Truck 
Transportation committee. Electric Railways 
committee. General Laws committee. Head 
Lights committee, Municipalities committee, 



m 



Organization committee. Rules of the Road 
committee. Steam Railways committee. 
Safety First and Safety Appliances com- 
mittee. 

There have been numerous entertainment 
features in connection with the convention, 
which opened with one of the greatest 
parades San Francisco has ever witnessed. 
Starting from the Ferry Building, the long 
line of police notables, traffic officers, bands 
and automobiles and trucks of every make, 
not to overlook the Curtiss Oriole taxi-ing 
along Market under its own .power, pro- 
ceeded up Market to the Civic Auditorium 
and passed in review in front of Mayor 
Rolph and other city officials. Long after 
the head of the procession had completed 
the line of march, the later units continued 
to form at the foot of Market, and it was 
officially estimated that it took one hour for 
the entire procession to pass a given point. 

For the city-wise motorist who is not 
accustomed to the narrow dirt roads of real 
up-State out-in-the-woods country, here are 
a few suggestions, made by G. A. Boyer, 
president of the Franklin Motor Car 
Company : 

1. Don't try to turn on narrow roads 
unless you are positive the ground on both 
sides is dry and firm. Where the road is 
high-crowned, careless attempts along this 
line are especially dangerous. 

2. Keep off boggy land; don't be afraid 
to break out chains when going through 
muddy stretches, even if it is summer. 

3. Be careful about going through grass 
at the side of the road. A sharp boulder or 
empty bottle may give a little exhibition of 
what the word havoc means if you take too 
many chances. 

4. Don't try to speed through puddles 
unless you can see the bottom and not 



boulders or tin cans. The same advice 
applies to fords with which one is unfa- 
miliar; also Fords. 

5. Be sure you have the right of way; 
then go ahead, but not until you are sure. 
This is especially a good thing to remember 
when jockeying for position on a two-by-four 
road with a five-ton truck and trailer as your 
competitor. 

6. Look out for gates; it's better to get 
out and open them than to go through the 
other way. Some farmers know how to 
build pretty husky gates. 

7. Speaking of farmers, it isn't good 
policy to call them "Rubes." or to otherwise 
insult their sensibilities; some of them are 
hot-tempered and there are lots of times 
when a motorist in grief needs their help. 
It's good propaganda to make the farmers 
feel friendly toward motorists and not the 
reverse. 

8. Cows are another thing to avoid, with 
horses and poultry still more good things to 
miss. 

9. Last but not least is Old Lady 
"Thank-You-Ma'am," who has wrecked 
many a pleasure-bent car. She is especially 
dangerous when met with at considerable 
speed on the up or down-grade. Look out 
for her. 

Following closely the announcement that 
the H. 0. Harrison interests had taken over 
the Dodge Brothers business for Northern 
California, comes word that Harold L. 
Arnold, for some time Hudson and Essex 
distributor for Southern California and Ari- 
zona, has taken over the Northern California 
and Nevada territory for these lines from the 
Harrison Company. From now on the 
Harrison organization will devote its entire 
time to merchandising the Dodge Brothers 
lines. 

With the deer season in full progress, 
many of the California distributors and 
dealers are forsaking business for hunting 
trips, and quite a few are bringing home the 
venison. Phillip S. Cole, president of the 
Haynes Auto Sales Company, and a party 
of friends, recently toured Mendocino county 
on a quite successful deer hunting party. 
Tony Holbek, president .of the Roamer 
Motor Car Company, has also recently re- 




L. 


E. PENNIMAN 


NORTHERN CALIFORNIA DISTRIBUTOR OF 


E 


nsign Carburetors 




605 VAN NESS AVENUE 


Near Turk St. San Francisco 




PHONE PROSPECT 5610 . 



August 28, 1920 

turned from the deer country of northern- 
most California. 

* * * 

Mack A. Erwin. Southern California rep- 
resentative of Camp Curry, has started on 
his annual "Yosemite Map Tour" in the 
Chalmers car that has carried him on this 
yearly expedition over the highways and 
byways of the State for four seasons .past. 
Every fall Erwin makes this trip, distributing 
Yosemite road maps and literature to all the 
important cities and towns of the State, stim- 
ulating interest in the famous "playground" 
of California, and increasing the late-season 
travel to Camp Curry. 

* # # 

E. J. Drussel, mayor of Napa, California, 
and a party of friends have just returned 
from a real he-jaunt over all kinds of Oregon 
roads, from the well-paved Columbia High- 
way to the roughest and toughest of inland 
sand lanes. Traveling in a Jordan Silhouette 
Six recently purchased from C. D. Rand & 
Company of San Francisco, the Drussel 
party journeyed to Portland, Oregon, took in 
a side trip up Mount Hood, and then re- 
lumed to their California home — inland. 
That means everything, for the roads of in- 
terior Oregon are notoriously lacking in all 
the elements considered essential to good 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

roads. However, the Jordan-ites experienced 
no difficulties, and on their return voted the 
entire trip a most delightful outing. 

& ¥ ¥ 

From the L. M. Field, Inc., western head- 
quarters in this city comes word of a further 
expansion of that organization. It consists 
in the announcement of a $100,000 branch 
company to handle the Field lines in the 
city of Fresno, one of the most prosperous 
smaller cities of the State. The center of 
the great raisin district of interior California, 
Fresno has gained the reputation of having 
more automobiles for its size than any other 
city in its class. 

The Fresno company will be headed by 
R. C. Field, a stockholder of the central 
company. With him will be associated C. J. 
Field. The lines handled will include Jack- 
son Six pleasure cars and trucks; Selden 
trucks and Atlas 1500-pound delivery 
wagons. 

Wesley D. Smight, for many years identi- 
fied with the tire industry here, has joined 
the Roamer Motor Car Company as whole- 
sale manager, according to announcement 
made by Tony Holbek, president of the local 
Roamer distributing organization. 



SUNSHINE SERVICE CO. 

HIGHWAY AND 12TH AVE., SAN MATEO. 

Auto repairing, painting, top and curtain work, and upholstering. A full and com- 
plete line of automobile accessories at city prices. All our work guaranteed. Day and 
night service. All work done by competent mechanics. Give us a trial- and be convinced. 
Distributors and service for Exide batteries. Phone San Mateo 33. 



r 



*m£. 




-tfttftfti^H 



17 



BE ON TIME, MEMBERS OF THE BENCH 

J. E. White, attorney-at-law, who is can- 
didate for Judge of the Superior Court, is 
one of the men of law who believe that 
promptness in Court attendance is one of the 
first duties of a Judge. He is receiving the 
endorsement of many prominent attorneys, 
and his advocacy of being on time in the 
Court room, will appeal to all members of 
the Bar. When a case is set for ten o'clock, 
numerous judges saunter in at eleven, and 
even after that, do not promptly get down 
to the business on the calendar, thus taking 
up valuable time, and delaying the whole 
Court. Attorney White will do all in his 
power to remedy this evil. 



HE DESERVED POISON 

Recently a farmer in Honduras called at a 
city drug store and asked for some poison 
with which to kill wild animals that were de- 
stroying his poultry. On being informed 
that no poison could be sold without a per- 
sonal recommendation from the mayor of 
the town, he went in search of that func- 
tionary and soon returned with the following 

note: "Please give Mr. W a little 

poison, as he is an honest man." The 
note was signed by the mayor. — Spectator. 



Quality 

TIRE SHOP 

Expert Tire and 
Tube Repairers 

Quality Retreading 



MARSHALL SQUARE 
VULCANIZING GO. 

10 Marshall Square 

Phnne Mark t 3837 



CLINTON CAFETERIA 



136 OFARRELL STREET 
Opposite Orpheum Theater 



Continuous Sei\in£ li.<ni 7 A M lo 8 V M- Miuir. I unch and Dinner Orchestral an i 



U. S. GARAGE 
750 Bush St. Phone Garfield 713 



PEARSON GARAGE 

345 Bush St. Phone Douglas 2120 

Repair Shop and Annex 350 Bush St. 



Largest and Most Complete Garages in 
the West 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 28, 1920 



WHY CHANGE, WHEN INCUMBENTS 
ARE ABSOLUTELY SATISFACTORY? 

Attention, Mr. Business Man! While we 
ask you a few questions: Would you, if you 
had recognized and appreciated certain em- 
ployees in your shop or office, and had been 
served by them faithfully for several years, 
and there was no possible reason for letting 
them go, would you rid yourself of their 
services, and put in their places untried and 
unfamiliar men? If you were a wise and 
capable business man, you know you would 
not! 

There are two Judges in the District 
Court of Appeals who for many years have 
served this city with marked ability and un- 
questioned integrity; they are tried and 
tested, and not found wanting in their ju- 
dicial duties. They are endorsed by the 
leaders of the bench and bar. They have 
proven their fitness by an unsullied record, 
and should therefore appeal to the good 
judgment of the electors on their records in 
private and public life. 

These two judges are Frank H. Brittain 
and John T. Nourse, incumbents, candidates 
for the offices of Judges of the Appellate 
Court. 

Why, Mr. Business Man, make a change 
in this Court, when the incumbents are able, 
high grade, conscientious Judges? 



HENRY M. OWENS' ENDORSEMENTS 

The following humanitarian principles in 
the administration of Henry M. Owens 
should recommend him to all thinking people 
in San Francisco, and make his election as 
Judge of the Superior Court a foregone con- 
clusion. Especially does his adoption of the 
single standard in the treatment of men and 
women in his court, evince a broad-minded- 
ness not usual to men in jurisprudence. 

In the "Owens for Superior Judge Club*," 
support has been pledged him because of 
(I) The attitude he has assumed in regard 
to treatment of the mentally deficient when 
accused of crime — that all morbid sympathy 
and extreme harshness be eliminated, but the 
past history of the defendant be carefully 
scrutinized in order to determine whether or 
not the defendant is a mental deficient; (2) 
On hearing influential friends of litigants 
outside court, the only evidence considered 
must be produced in open court, thus insur- 
ing fairness to all litigants; (3) In all cases 
where defendants plead guilty, that evidence 
be carefully inquired into in order that the 
judge may determine the degree of punish- 
ment to be meted out; (4) In his merciful 
treatment of all first offenders and those of 
mature years; (5) In his effort to stamp out 
the sale and use of narcotic drugs; (6) In 
his stand on the adoption of the single 
standard in the treatment of men and women 



in his court; (7) In his stand against unlaw- 
ful seizures, searches and the entrance of 
private homes without proper warrants. 



— There are many garages in town and the 
motorist is often in a quandary as to where 



to go, especially for permanent service. 
There are very few who give you the quality 
of service of Dow & Green, on Taylor street, 
between O'Farrell and Geary. Here your car 
will receive something more than the "once 
over," and the prices are moderate. 




YOUR CLIENTS 

are sure to hear, sooner or later, about the New Policy which the 
Pacific Mutual originated and recently perfected. 

It would be a matter of good business for you to tell them yourself 
instead of waiting for your competitor to do so. 

The NON-CANCELLABLE DISABILITY INCOME 
POLICY is the last word in complete protection against every disability 



$1000 A MONTH FOR $200 A YEAR 



WRITE FOR COMPLETE INFORMATION 

F. A. STEARNS, Manager Accident Department 

SHREVE BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
THE 

Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 



EARTHQUAKE 



CAPITAL $2,000,000.00 
FIRE 



AUTOMOBILE 



PATRONIZING AMERICAN INSTITUTIONS 
IS PRACTICAL PATRIOTISM 

The North River Insurance Co. 



Incorporated 1822 



Pacific Department 

266 Bush St. 



Wm. W. Alverson 

Manager 



Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 



CAPITAL $3,000,000 
FIRE 



AUTOMOBILE 



ASSETS $22,500,000 
MARINE 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Co. in America" 

FIRE AUTOMOBILE WINDSTORM 

TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 

REASONABLE RATES 



Graney's Billiard Parlor 



Finest in the World 
Perfect Ventilation 
924 Market Street 
61 Eddy Street 



EDDIE GRANEY, Proprietor 



T3fe Casa del Rey 

is a million dollar fire-proof hotel, on 
the sunny bathing beach at Santa 
Cruz. It offers the advantages of 
tennis, golf, motoring, fishing and 
swimming, and is the center of Santa 
Cruz social life. 

MORRIS & WARNER. Props. 



rlffiKal i 



217 Second Avenue, San Mateo 
SPECIAL SUNDAY DINNER $1.00 
MEALS A LA CARTE 

Special attention paid to banquets, automobile 
parties and tourists. The only first-class a la 
carte restaurant in San Mateo. The hotel is 
entirely new; hot and cold water in every room. 
All well lighted. Rooms with private bath. 
Prices moderate. Summer rates given. Elevator 
service. 



EPPLER'S 

BAKERY and LUNCH 

886 Geary Street 



Branch Confectionery 

SUTTER and POWELL STREETS 

Phone Douglas 191.2 



The Cecil Hotel 

of San Francisco offers 
the perfect combination 
of home and hotel life. 
Cuisine excellent. Lux- 
ury of billiard, card and 
reading rooms. 

Mrs. O. E. MORRIS. Proprietor. 



J. B. Pou J. Bergez C. Lalanne 

L. Coutard C Mailhebuau 

BERGEZ-FRANK S 

Old POODLE-DOG Co. 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

Music and Entertainment Every E\ening 

•41 S-421 Bush St.. San Francisco 

(Above Kearny") Exchange, Doug. 2411 



Wedding Presents: The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is nqw per- 
manently located at Post and Powell streets. 



USE 

Associated Products 

"More Miles to the Gallon" 



Associated Oil Company 

Sharon Bldg. San Francisco 



CLOCK 
REPA1RINC 




ALL MAKES 
OF CLOCKS 
REPAIRED 



WATCH DEPARTMENT 
Chimes and complicated clocks a specialty 
Clocks kept in order by contract, town and 

country 

We carry an attractive line of new clocks 

Work guaranteed in every detail 

CALIFORNIA CLOCK CO. 

418-19 Whitney Bldg. 133 Geary Street 

Phone Garfield 2570 J. Topping. Manager 



Potted Plants 
and Ferns 

OF DISTINCTION 

SUITABLE FOR ANY 

OCCASION AT NURSERY 

PRICES 

Bay Counties Seed Co. and 

Nurseries 

404 Market Street. San Francisco 



BLANCO'S 

Farrell and Larkin SU. 
Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without 
dining in the finest cafe in America 

Luncheon (11 : 30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner $1.75 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIALTY 

; m. 

548 Sacramento St-, cor. Leidasdorf f 



AUTOMOBILE STARTING AND 
LIGHTING SYSTEMS 

Give satisfactory results when given proper at- 
tention. We specialize on Electrical equipment, 
storage batteries, etc., and guarantee satisfaction. 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

Brand & Cushman 
955 Post St. Phone Prospect 741 



AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE 
EXCLUSIVELY 

Union Indemnity Exchange 

of California 



Better Rates 



Quicker Service 



American National Bank Building 
Telephone Sutler 2645- Sutler 2646 



Want a Better Position? 

Bell Syllabic Shorthand in Six Weeks. 

Bell Touch Typewriting in Six Weeks. 

Our Complete Stenographic or "Dictaphone" 
Course in about Two Months. 

If you wish to prepare in ONE-FOURTH 
the lime and at ONE-FOURTH the cost, EN- 
ROLL NOW. 

One of our courses makes an ideal Holiday 
for the wife, son or daughter, and PROTECTS 
THEIR future for all time. Individual instruc- 
tion. Day and Evening. 

Investigation costs you nothing, and may save 
regret. 

THE SYLLABIC INSTITUTE 
"The 6 Weeks' Business School." 

376 Sutler Street. (Douglas 4316) 

SAN I R ANCISCO. CALIF. 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

INSURANCE BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 




n «r co.si. 
POLK »no POST STS. 



We are advertised by our loving friends" 



Myran K.Nelson, 
Clarence, Ills. 



Mellin s Food 

Mellin's Food, properly prepared, 
furnishes every element a baby needs 
to grow and develop as Nature intends. 
That is why Mellin's Food babies grow 
strong, robust and vigorous. 

Send today for a Free Trial Bottle of Mellin 's Food. 



Mellin's Food Company, 



Boston, Mass. 



#M©8@(§ ( 




<&u\%i#mm%totttrt%ztr> 




SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1920 



e 



Indian Summer 



in the 



High Si 



lerra 



: ^ 




California's Alpine 
Region Is Glorious in 
September. 

Yosemite — 

Lake Tahoe — 

Sequoia and Gen. Grant Parks — 

Kings and Kern Rivers Canyons- 

Huntington Lake — 

Shasta Region 

Comfortable Hotels— Well Equipped Camps 
Trail Riding— Mountain Climbing— Fishing -Hunting 

Reduced round trip season tickets on sale daily. Still lower round trip fares Friday and Saturdays— return limit 

fifteen days. 

For illustrated folder, "Outdoor Life in the Sierras," or "Outing Resorts" booklet, write Chas. S. Fee, Pass. Traf. Mp. 

65 Market St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Southern Pacific Lines 



v 



j 



Telephone Sutler 6654 



Importers 



GEO, W. GASWELL CO. 

COFFEE AND TEA 

Spices. Baking Powder, Flavoring 

Extracts 

442-452 Second Street. San Francisco 



For that stubborn cough 
Use Old Snake Doctor's Cough Remedy 

SNAKE DRUG CO. 

Formerly G. Leipnitz & Co. 

Now Located at 

127-129 KEARNY ST. 



MacRORlE - McLAREN CO. 

FLORISTS. NURSERYMEN 

and 
LANDSCAPE ENGINEERS 

141 Powell Street, San Francisco 

Nurseries: San Mateo 

Phone San Mateo 1002 

Phone Douglas 4946 and Palace Hotel 



A. \V. BEST ALICE BEST 

BEST'S 

ART SCHOOL 

1625 California Street 

Life Classes — Day and Night 

Illustrating Sketching Painting 



TIRES VULCANIZING 

THOMAS H. ELKINGTON 

Distributor for 

Kelly-Springfield Tires 

Long Mileage Tires and Second Hand Tires 

865 POST ST.. Near Hyde 

Phone PROSPECT 1566 




FIREPROOF 

STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1636 Market St 

Bet. Franklin and Gough 
Tel. Park 271 San Francisco 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital — „.. 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of Pro- 
prietors 



Aggregate Assets. 30lh 
Sept. 1919 




$ 23.828.500.00 
16.375.000.00 

23.828.500.00 



$377,721,211.00 



SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E. ( General Manager 



351 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian Slates. New Zealand. Fiji. Papua (New 

Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australian Banking 

Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 



Head Office: 
GEORGE STREET. SYDNEY 



London Office : 
29 THREADNEEDLE STREET. E. C. 2 



Agents 



Bank of California. National Assn.. Anglo & London-Paris Nal'l Bank. Crocker Nat'l Bank 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO. CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 

STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and at LONDON. ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND. ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE. 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Manager W. J. COULTHARD. Assistant Manager 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 California St., San Francico, Cal. 
Member of the Federal Reserve System 
Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement and 7lh Avenue 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haighl and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30, 1920 

Assets $66,840,376.95 Capital Actually Paid Up $ 1,000.000.00 

Deposits 63.352269.17 Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,488.107.78 

Employees' Pension Fund $330,951.36 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK. President 

GEO. TOURNY. Vice-Pres. and Managei A. H. R. SCHMIDT. Vice-Pres. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE. Vice-President A. H. MULLER. Secretary 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE. Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN. Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL. Assistant Cashier 

G. A. BELCHER. Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN. Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYER. Manager Mission Branch W. C. HEYER. Manager Park-Presidio Dist. Branch 

O. F. PAULSEN. Manager Haighl Street Branch 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JOHN A. BUCK E. T. KRUSE I. N. WALTER A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY A. H. R. SCHMIDT HUGH GOODFELLOW E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. A. CHRISTENSON ROBERT DOLLAR L. S. SHERMAN 

GOODFELLOW. EELLS. MOORE & ORRICK. General Attorneys 



THE ANGLO & LONDON PARIS NATIONAL BANK 

BOND DEPARTMENT 

Recommend* the purchase of Sutter Basin Company Bonds. 

The Security is exceptional — a first mortgage on 55,000 acres of the famous Sacramento 
D-lla, every acre under profitable cultivation; and the Unconditional Guarantee of 
Mr. J. Ogden Armour of Chicago, er>iorsed on the back of every bond. 
8 Per Cent. Interest 
The Term of the loan will suit every requirement. One may invest for any length of time 

from three years to nine years. 
The Amount may be $100, which will return $8.00 a year; $500, which will return $40.00 
a year; or $1,000. which will return $80.00 a year. 

Complete information on request. Phone, write or call. 

Sutter and Sansome Streets Phone Kearny 5600 

San Francisco, California 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20. 1856. 

SAN PS^CI*^ 




TEH 



Devoled to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. XCVIII. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1920 



No. 9 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA 
ADVERTISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. 
Frederick Marriott, 259 Minna Street, near Fourth, San Francisco, Cal, 
Telephone Kearny 720. Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post Office as second- 
class mail matter. 

London Office: George Street fit Company, 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year $2.50. Foreign: One 
year $5.00; Canada, one year, $3.50. 

The only thing that people can brew now is trouble. 



Deing 



-"Wrangel uses peace tactics to help Russ!" 
false to his name? 



Is he at last 



The refusal of Queen Mary to allow Lady Diana Manners a 

histrionic career, shows that England is still ruled by royalty socially, 
if not politically. 



Well, it's to be hoped that when the American cruiser 

"Pittsburg" arrives at Danzig to protect our countrymen, who have 
been stranded there, it won't be used as an excuse to embroil the 
U. S. in more European trouble! 



We expect that the woods will be full of moonshiners for 

many a day, and that more killings will take place in raids on stills. 
It looks as if human beings are bound to procure liquor, whether 
through "moonshining", or by whiskey permits from doctors. 



The Dahlia Show, beginning Thursday at the Palace, should 

be well patronized. It is these spots of vivid color, like the flo«cr 
vendors' stands at the street corners, which help to make city life 
more livable for lovers of the beautiful. 



The foolhardy risks taken in air stunting, can only end in 

tragedy, such as the one in Santa Rosa, last Saturday, when Leon 
Ferguson was killed. There should be a law restricting such exhi- 
bitions, for not only do they endanger the lives of the exhibitors, 
but also the lives of the spectators. 



That we are a superstitious people can be proved by the 

fact that much space is taken up by the newspapers at times, telling 
of different good or bad luck omens, and what they mean. 



The Anglo-German treaty urged at Berlin, which is the only 

way open to control the Bolshevik tendency which is growing all 
over Europe, according to Von Kemnitz. national member of the 
Reichstag, is "nauseating, but necessary." The colossal assurance 
of the Germans seems unimpaired by the war. or anything else. 



The affair of Addicott's suspension from the Polytechnic 

High School, is fast becoming a revolution. It has led to one thing, 
however, and that is the draft of the proposed amendment to the 
city's charter, providing for a change (we hope for the better) m 
tha system of school go\ernment. It has been said that the schools 
ol San Francisco were far behind the eastern institutions of 
learning. 



Why all this talk of "slush funds" between the opposing 

political parties? Haven't there always been "slush funds" from 
time immemorial, and won't there always be, world without end. 



Each presidential candidate is preaching that the poor U. S. 

will go to the "demnition bow-wows," if the other wins out. But 
what difference does it really make to the "man in the street?" He 
is the property and tool of the State in times of war; (and red 
War plucks the flower of the land in every generation, whether the 
administration be Republican or Democratic) ; at other times the 
State forgets him. 



The League of Nations has perhaps caused more argument. 

pro and con. than any other national or international document, and 
quite often, these arguments are carried on by persons who really 
have no grasp of the great question. It would be well for all of us 
to read it over, as it is now being published in installments, and with 
explanations, in a local newspaper, so that we will be better able to 
vote intelligently on this issue in November. 



It was a tragic day on the water front last Saturday, and the 

tragedies were the consequence of bad seamanship on the part of 
the officers of the I'. S. Destroyer, in smashing the Crowley Launch 
in broad daylight, and clear weather, and in some one's rank care- 
lessness, when a hoisting block gave way in the hold of a vessel, 
crushing two men at the bottom. Carelessness in any sort of work. 
is inexcusable, but it become criminal, when human lives are at 
stake. 



A peevish citizen in 1875. published a long list of grievances 

then existing, he considered, against the conduct of pedestrians in 
the streets of San Francisco. One of them was headed. "Turn to 
the right." and began by saying that "this should always be the 
custom in passing along the sidewalk." Have the crowded sidewalks 
improved since then > Haven't you had to dodge people quite often, 
who were on the wrong side? And also people who slowly saunter 
along, looking intently at something in the rear? 



Terence MacSwiney. Sinn Fein mayor of Cork. Ireland, is 

dying in a British prison, as We write this, starving himself to death. 
Ireland has been a land of political martyrs ever since Robert 
Emmett. who stands out more vividly than any other, and it would 
appear that each death is as futile as the last. For over 200 years. 
England, in times of stress and crises, has promised Ireland her 
freedom, and never made good her word. As regards promi 
is a regular "Indian Giver." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 4, 1920 



Editorial 



Foreign trade with the United States has received 
America First! great stimulus as a result of the war, which 
brought to the American manufacturers a foreign 
business far beyond the dreams of any man. The fighting nations 
wanted goods, and were willing to pay almost any price for them. 
The huge profits were a great incentive, and the American factories 
were enlarged beyond all requirements in times of peace. 

The cargo of certain ships taken at random, show that practically 
everything that we manufacture in this country finds a ready market 
abroad. In a few short years we have progressed from a debtor 
nation to the greatest creditor nation the world has ever known. We 
have taken our place among the great states of the world, not only 
politically (as when we joined the allies in crushing a country mad 
for world-dominance), but commercially. Statistics show that in 
1919, our exports were valued at $7,922,150,592. 

President Wilson, several years ago, at the time of the slump in 
cotton, in his address to the cotton manufacturers of the South, 
bade them "go and seek foreign markets, and not come crying to 
the White House, like a lot of children, when the first clouds loomed 
upon the sky." Now foreign countries consume 65 to 70 per cent 
of our cotton. 

At one time domestic trade was sufficient because rapidly increas- 
ing consumption at home made possible a business growth which was 
steady enough to be healthful. Conditions during the last few years 
have radically changed. Industry and the country have grown so 
big that world markets are necessary to support the structure, but 
there can be too much of a good thing, even when it is a matter of 
world commerce. Prices of all commodities are soaring, and it looks 
as though their limit was not yet reached. High prices have, time 
and again, been laid to a "scarcity" of the article in question, and 
surely manufacturers are taking an unfair advantage of domestic 
necessity, when they export products to foreign countries by the 
millions of tons, and then, to explain the exorbitant charges to 
domestic consumers, put up the cry: "Scarcity of production!" 

The price of milk has for some time been higher than can be 
paid by the ordinary working man. and millions of children all over 
the United States have suffered in consequence. And yet, we read 
in a paper advocating more and more foreign trade, that: 

"Just now there appears to be a very large over-production 
of canned milk and also of cheese. There are tremendous 
accumulations of evaporated milk in France and England. 
Milk, butter and cheese have been sent abroad in larger 
quantities than were consumed. The armies have left large 
accumulations here and there to be sold at best terms 
obtainable. Exchange has operated to the great disadvantage 
of the American producer and a general warning has gone 
forth that manufacturers must proceed with care. Curtail- 
ment of production has already begun." 

Lumber prices have become so tremendous that building has 
been, comparatively speaking, at a standstill for the past few 
years, and cities are unable to meet the demand for houses, while 
furniture prices were never so high. Yet we read that in 1919, our 
exports in lumber totaled $136,786,663. and our furniture exports 
increased from three and a half millions in 1918, to five million 
dollars in 1919. 

Especially in the purchase of paper there should be more thought 
given to the domestic consumer, who now pays 22 cents a pound, 
as against 5 cents a pound before the war. Not only are the 
charges unreasonable, but there is a shortage, and many publications 
on this Coast are hard put to it, on account of delay in shipments. 



The "San Antonio Light" makes a statement that will be agreed to 
by all consumers of paper, when it says that "wasps were the 
original makers of paper, and ever since, the consumer has been 
getting stung regularly." 

The manufacturers of paper in the United States are supplying 
the needs of foreign countries, for, since the war, the German, 
Belgian and English export of paper has been reduced; therefore 
America has to meet the demand to a large extent. In the mean- 
time, the American publishers suffer, not only from scarcity of this 
commodity, but also from exorbitant prices. 

Would it be too Utopian a dream to suggest that the Government 
put a maximum limit to the profit on all commodities sold in the 
United States; that there might be a domestic price lower than the 
charges we demand in foreign markets; in fact, that all the demands 
of the domestic market be supplied before commodities are shipped 
to foreign markets? 

When we read that 93.09 per cent of our imports from South 
America (and our Latin American trade is steadily on the increase), 
were admitted by the United States free of all duty, during the year 
of 1918, we resent the knowledge borne in upon us, that the people 
of this country are being taxed beyond all logical argument, in 
order to make up for certain glaring deficiencies and super- 
abundancies in our foreign trade. 

Why not start the slogan — "America First!" in the matter of 
attending to our own needs before we fill the needs of other 
countries? 



Most of the pleasure of living is being eliminated 
Joy o' Life gradually from our existence by a class of self-deluded 
reformers, who are unconsciously being used as tools 
of unscrupulous capitalists. Most thinking people realize that 
prohibition is merely for the poor, brought about by two powers — 
big employers who believe that more work will be accomplished by 
their men, if drink is unobtainable, and by the great candy manu- 
facturers and "soft drink" sellers, who know that some substitute will 
be craved in place of sparkling wines. 

Cafes and restaurants have lost their olden atmosphere of bubbling 
merriment; one even notices that funny papers are not funny any 
more. The poor old world, trying to strgger up, out of the 
maelstrom of war, looks about bewilderedly, — and misses the great 
boon of man-kind, — unrestrained and natural joy of life. 

The climatic conditions of California tend toward free and easy 
living. We are not, naturally, a puritanical people. We are more 
tolerant than intolerant: more apt to be prodigal than prudent. In 
this, we lean more toward the Latin races (is not our whole history 
imbued with the romance of old Spain?) than toward the Anglo- 
Saxons. This reform movement, which has been sweeping over the 
globe, even leaving its traces in poor, confused Russia (their revolu- 
tion might possibly be laid to the door of prohibition!) is alien to 
this land of blossom and sun. — this land of full expression and 
ardent development. It is something that has been transplanted 
from the pinched and frosty hills of New England, by a pinched and 
frosty people, to our smiling State of tawny beaches and purple 
mountains. It does not belong here, it is strange and unnatural, and 
we hope to — whatever Gods created California, — that it withers and 
dies a speedy death. 

Perhaps the Fire had something to do with the change of spirit 
in San Francisco, — that may have been the beginning, — combined 
with the influence of the long-faced alien people from other parts of 
the country, who flocked here at the time, and seem to have taken 
possession of our Empire, especially the Southern district. But this 
recent Sunday-school class of legislation is the last straw. Will we 
cringe under it, accept it meekly, feel that, like a lot of miscreants, 
we deserve it? That it is for the good of our craven souls; that 
perhaps we needed it. we the "foolish folk, who know that life 
is good?" 



September 4, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Even dear old Lyman Abbott has come to life again (we thought 
him dead long ago, but just recently read something of his, in a 
London Weekly), and running true to form, protesting wildly against 
this most materialistic and extravagant age! 

People who through age, or manipulations by some unseen, but 
very mundane power; or who have an idea fixed firmly in their 
minds that they are of the elect, and have a message for the poor, 
depraved world, are all striving to crush what little happiness there 
is left, from humanity. 

Isn't it about time that a voice be raised, even such a voice as 
ours, — small, and thin, and perhaps ineffectual in itself, but ready 
and eager to start a counter-movement to this suppression, not of 
vice, as it pretends to be, but of life itself; to preach gayety 
instead of gloom, to bring back to San Francisco some of the 
festivity of olden days, days when we could blow bubbles from our 
glass, and toast a pair of pretty eyes, when we had an "Improvement 
Club" for every street, and a week of festival, with the crowning 
of a queen as a part of it; when, on moonlight nights, we were 
awakened by the tinkling and twanging of stringed instruments, as 
some impromptu orchestra strolled by our bedroom window; days 
when "efficiency" was not drilled into us, until we have become 
automatoms; days when life was worth the price the piper asked! 
Won't you join your voices with my small, thin one. in a clamor that 
can be heard even by the 50,000 Iowans of our Angel City of the 
South for more, and still more, of the Joy of Life. 



•••»»»»■■•' '•"■- ' »VMM»»»MM/WM»»»/W/W 



A VICTORY FOR SHORTRIDCE! 

Sam Shorlridge has won the senatorial nomination 
in this State by a margin of 40,000! Which is some 
margin, isn't it? And we are rejoicing at the news. 
There are undeniably splendid qualities about Mr. 
Shorlridge; his loyalty to his party being one; his firm 
stand for the protection of all industries, being another; 
his slogan, — "America for Americans!" — his admira- 
tion for our greatest presidents, — Washington and 
Lincoln, and his determination to carry out their 
policies against all opposition. But in picturing our 
Sam talfing his place at Washington, as California's 
senator, we thinl( that the particular characteristics of 
his which will please us the most, are his elegance of 
manner, his perfect diction, his eloquent oratory, his 
method of living up to the old-time standards of honor, 
and his strict conformity to the duty imposed by 
conscience and position. 

So here's to Sam Shorlridge, even if we have to 
drinl( his health in grape juice! And should he be 
elected this fall (which is a foregone conclusion), we 
feel that the administration of the affairs of our beloved 
State is safe in his hands. 



*///„.■/////, ■„,//.. ..;,.,, ,.. ', 

The history of Woman Suffrage is interesting 
Woman's Suffrage reading. From Lucretia Mott to Alice Paul 

stretches a long line of earnest women, and 
looking back at it we have to smile at the words of the poet, "For 
men must work and women must weep." Not much sitting at home 
snivelling for these mothers, wives, daughters: their shoulders have 
been pressed hard against the wheel whose every revolution brought 
them nearer to their goal. In London, during the fierce fight led by 
the Pankhuists. we attended a meeting of the conservative suffragists 
add 1 .idy Fiances Ballour. who was speaking, looked out upon her 
large and interested audience and said. "Ladies, while we all deplore 
the terrific methods of the militants in this great work, we must be 




dfamue/Jif. <&]70j*trJdc?e 



fair, and I will tell you. I who have been working thirty years for 
suffrage, that if it were not for Mrs. Pankhurst and her brave 
supporters. I should be talking today to a handful of women instead 
of a hundred." The militant women uttered a wild, loud war-cry; 
n ml heard the length and breadth of the land; it was answered. 
Of the ready wit of Mrs. Pankhurst we had an example one evening 
in the Chelsea Hall in London, when after the speaker had sat down, 
a very tall, very bristling and argumentive gentleman in the audience 
arose and in a rasping voice began. "This is all very good, all very 
fine, all very convincing, no doubt, but I want to ask you ladies and 
gentlemen, all claiming to be loyal Britons, faithful to our best 
traditions. I want to ask you what would our beloved sovereign, the 
late lamented and respected and loved Queen Victoria have said to 
this kind of talk?" It was a blow below the belt. We squirmed a 
little. The English attitude toward its Royalty, and particularly 
toward the Old Queen, is proverbial, bred in the bone. Mrs 
Pankhurst stood up and eyed the irate gentleman with that disarming 
smile of hers, and kindly but firmly she replied. "With all respect and 
reverence and love for our late queen, our beloved Victoria. I think 
we will all of us have to admit that Her Majesty was — er— well, just 
a wee bit Early-Victorian in some of her views." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 4, 1920 



— U O 



Sterne's knowledge of human nature was never better shown 

than when he said that a man's character was best drawn from his 
"hobby-horse." The surplus energy with which almost every human 
being is endowed must have scope and some of the most entertaining 
traits in the characters of our friends are manifested when they get 
on what are recognized as their hobbies. A man is generally proud 
of his hobby; its existence pre-supposes some degree of imagination, 
perhaps a little superiority over those who have no hobby. A hobby 
ceases to be amusing when it is ridden to excess, and unfortunately 
there are men who constantly do ride their particular hobby-horses 
to excess. What can be more terrible than to meet a man in society 
whose whole soul is filled with one idea, which he has converted into 
a hobby — the one idea generally being wrong? Whims and 
crotchets, amusing and charming as they sometimes may be in 
elderly people, with whom hr bit has gradually become a second 
nature, are mere affectation and absurdity when indulged in by 
youth. Many a man has fallen a willing martyr to his hobby. The 
laughter and ridicule of the world only proves the folly of the 
world. This belief is as firmly fixed in the mind of Mr. Wilson 
when the wisdom of his League of Nations hobby is questioned as 
it would be in the minds of the poorest of his subjects should 
universal enlightenment sweep away the nursery steeds such eccentric 
natures continue to ride through life. 



Phrenologists tell us that when an organ of the brain has 

more than its fair share of work to do it makes that part of the 
gentleman's head where it lies sore and tender, proving the need of 
change. One of these sore-heads, with his organ of envy prostrated 
by overwork, writing anonymously over the signature of "Herald" 
makes an attack on a political rival and tells how the story may be 
verified. I commonly pay no attention to anonymous correspondents, 
consigning their screeds to the waste-basket, but I make an exception 
in this one's favor, for he lives in Alameda and probably does not 
know any better. The exception is made for the further reason that 
it affords me an opportunity to say that I wish there were no such 
thing as scandal and no necessity for writing unpleasant things. I 
have not the slightest appreciation of the wit that wounds, nor of 
humorous writings done at the expense of personal feeling. There 
is but one meaner thing in all the world — the wretch who sneaks 
behind the cover of an alias to vent his spleen against one whom he 
is too cowardly to face. 



In these days of small shares and public companies or corpor- 
ations the question has been asked, is the thrifty section of the public 
coming to the conclusion that it can do a little better for itself than 
by purchasing United States Government bonds? Lord Rothschild, 
for one is rather inclined to think so. That fatal narrowing of the 
intellectual horizon that isolation begets may be responsible for Lord 
Rothschild's belief. For like reason he will affirm in the impossi- 
bility of anybody traveling more than a few hundred miles in any 
direction without getting into the sea. I might tell this noble lord 
that the people of this country are differently opinioned. But he 
would not believe me. He would stick his head in the fog and let 
the storm of industrial activity eddy around his exposed parts, firm 
in the conviction that when it rains in Pali-Mall the balance of the 
world is immediately converted into a dismal swamp. 



One of our leading jurists asserted, the other day, that he 

would not at all times take the word of any man on the witness 
stand. Probability has been applied to test the evidence of witnesses, 
that is, to ascertain if they are speaking the truth; also with regard 
to the verdict of juries and even the decisions of magistrates and 
judges. All writers on .probability assume that everybody deviates 
from the truth sometimes. There is said to be a very limited number 
of George Washingtons left. What is the probability that an 
ordinary individual speaks the truth? Some say that it may be taken 
as nine to ten, that is, the truth is spoken nine times out of ten. 
Some authorities say this is far too high, and suggest three times out 
of four. This is a difficult point to settle. When the probability 
that a man speaks the truth gets down to one-half he evidently wants 
looking after. When he gets down to less than half, he wants some- 
thing more than mere looking after. 



It appears that the young Oakland lady who had the 

misfortune to murder her husband has flashing eyes, and symmetrical 
limbs which she flashes upon all possible occasions. It was known 
that she had a flashing pistol but although she has confessed a cold- 
blooded killing, her attorney claims for her a dull mentality by 
asserting her innocence. It is to be hoped that this innocence will 
not be thought a ground of acquittal, her sex being sufficient for 
that. Just now, however, public indignation is running at so high 
a pitch against murder that the jury may find it difficult to acquit 
all the female assassins at present in custody, in which case it may 
be found expedient to send a few to jail. Every human institution 
is a failure, but the jury system as a means of justice is the most 
lamentable failure of all. 



Leading physicians are of the opinion that there is great 

danger of the bacteriological craze landing its devotees in a quag- 
mire, from which extraction will be difficult if not impossible without 
loss of prestige. The earnest investigators are prone in their 
enthusiasm to take too much for granted (the wish being father to 
the thought), and it will not be at all surprising to find that many 
steps will have to be retraced; many ingenious and promising 
theories abandoned. It should be borne in mind that microscopic 
life is in the main beneficial to humanity; that the varieties 
associated with disease are comparatively few, by comparison with 
the others, and that in the case of the bacteria that have been 
definitely identified with specific diseases, it has never been satis- 
factorily demonstrated that they are the cause, and not the product, 
in such cases. 



In cases like the recent public school unpleasantness, one is 

almost obliged to take a side of the controversy. My place has 
been made for me by the enthusiastic loyalty of hundreds of Mr. 
Addicott's pupils to him. The devotion of these boys and girls who 
are between the ages of fourteen and eighteen is a pearl beyond 
price. I do not think there is a man who, having it, could do 
anything but what he honestly believed to be the right thing. From 
all that I can learn, which has been gathered from all quarters save 
the teachers who, of course, are afraid to open their mouths, Mr. 
Addicott's attitude toward that part of our educational system 
represented by the Polytechnic High School, is one of earnest 
endeavor to keep up the standard of his school. I am informed that 
"Poly" has the reputation of being "easy" and many slackers get 
through who have not earned their diplomas and whose achievements 
are of such a slight nature as to lower the tone of the whole school 
and make a jest of its scholarship. In order to correct this sorry 
state of affairs. Mr. Addicott is weeding out the no-accounts. Good 
luck to his elbow! 



Some- way. we don't like the idea of that air line between 

Berlin and San Francisco. Or are we "provincial" in our views? 



September^ 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



^,W^/WW//«^^^ 



A PURPLE ORCHID 



By Eleanore F. Lewys-Ross. 



y^/w/^/V/W/^/y^^^^ 



It nestled in the yellow sheen of her hair like a knot of blue velvet, 
end matched in hue the purple iris of her eyes. Perhaps in the face 
beneath it there lurked, covertly, nearly annihilated by generations 
of "free-born" Americanism, something breathing a little of the 
bourgeoise of her ancestors; but dainty apparel, the polish that years 
of luxurious surroundings are bound to produce, smothered it from 
sight, at least from the casual observer. 

She was never seen without this flower in the coils of spun silk 
that crowned her head. It rested behind one small ear so that no 
costly chapeau could crush it, and in a way spoke eloquently of the 
whole nature of its wearer; this small, priceless blossom, secured 
by what labor and danger from dark South American jungles, to 
bloom for a day in her ladyship's hair! 

Now she stood, trailing silken skirts over the dusty floor of her 
husband's book-bindery, taking a languid interest in the process ot 
launching car-loads of literary efforts on an over-stocked market ; 
patronizing, politely curious, and truth to tell, very much in the 
way. 

And her husband? He stood impatiently waiting until her 
capricious fancy would move her to accompany him to lunch. From 
time to time she glanced at him scornfully. At least in this she 
could torment him. Had he not, from the first, assumed an air of 
condescension toward her, he of the blue-blooded aristocracy of 
France? Was not his gold well balanced by her youth? And 
he was so old! His scanty white locks stirred with the breeze from 
the open window. How the garish light of the bindery showed up 
his blear eyes and flabby cheeks! How colorless he was. and 
how old! 

Suddenly she became aware of the concentrated gaze of a pair 
of black eyes; not fastened upon herself, but upon their owner's 
employer. The man, pausing for a moment from his work, leaned 
his lithe young body against the table of the power-cutter he was 
operating, and stared as if half-fascinated, wholly forgetful of the 
task before him. He seems to the girl watching him, as if obvious 
of the menial labor he was engaged in, and yet breathing deadly 
rebellion against the man in whose behalf it was enforced. 

The fishy blue eyes of his employer at last turned to him, as if 
unwillingly propelled, and an unusually brilliant gleam of anger 
glowed in them. "You seem to have plenty of leisure, my friend." 
he said, ironically. "Come, Alix! " and he turned toward the door. 

The girl followed him silently, sweeping along as a queen might 
among her subjects. As she passed the cutting table a fold of her 
gown blew against the man. He started and looked up. She came 
a little closer to him. and placed one white-gloved finger on the 
knife. "It must be awfully interesting to work, and so clean!" she 
said, laughing; "and so easy! Just to fix your sheets of paper, turn 
that crank, and then zip! Down it goes, straight through!" 

"It reminds me of the executioner's block in France, at the time 
of the Revolution," he answered, quietly. "I should like to see It 
with a man's head underneath ! Say some enemy's ! Some person s 
who is better dead than alive. Just to crush it under the knife, 
turn the crank, and then, zip! down it would go straight through 
some wrinkled old neck' How sure a death it would be! How 
clean, and how easy!" And he laughed. 

The girl moved closer to him. "But there would be a good deal 
of blood," she exclaimed, half reluctantly entering into the weird 
>;iirit of his thoughts. 

"But you know they always had a basket for the heads to fall 
into," he answered. "The heads of the damned aristocrats!" His 
face flushed, and a vein on his temple swelled bluely. The woman 
glanced at him underneath golden eye-lashes. 



"How savage you are!" she said, with her little, musical, soulless 
laugh. "One would think you really meant it." Something in his 
voice, low, vibrating with the primitive instinct of antagonism 
existing between the man who enjoyed the fruits of his labor and 
himself, the laborer, awoke a responsive chord in the girl's breast 
that could not be stilled. 

This feeling that they were both conscious of had not sprung into 
existence with their own short lives; it had thrived and triumphed 
even in the days of Marat's assassination by Charlotte Corday; the 
revolutionary enmity, the striving of right over might, the great 
problem that will always create its periodical agitations until some 
master-mind hurls into the ears of a waiting world its solution. 

And then, gradually, this expression changed to one more personal, 
deeper, primeval; changed with the one emotion that found birth 
centuries before any of the revolutions of the world, than which the 
world itself is in comparison infantile! 

How strangely unfamiliar the gloomy apartment seemed, lit by 
the murky flame of his candle. It breathed of the utter loneliness 
that is felt only in places once teeming with life and action, and then 
deserted. A loneliness besides which the forest's solitude is 
companionable! 

How life during the past few weeks had changed for him! Once 
filled with the world's thought, restless, ever following some new 
groove of expression that seemed to lead to the answering of vital 
questions; interested in and for his fellow-workers; virile, strong, 
torceful. a man of promise who would improve his position in life, 
as his mind advanced. Now. overmastered body and soul by a 
sudden infatuation for a woman whom he could never claim! 

Bah! What a contraction of the soul is love! 

The wintry moonlight creeping in through the window, struggled 
for supremacy with the feeble light he held, and helped to bring into 
relief the different objects of the bindery. Over in the corner stood 
the machine at which he passed so many seemingly interminable 
hours during the weary day. Its silent inaction mocked at him. 
and he remembered that he had come for a purpose tonight — there 
was some extra work to attend to. He moved over to it. intending 
to light the gas jet near by. 

Dazed a little by the sudden gleam of light, he failed to see a dark, 
huddled heap on the floor at his feel, and stumbled. It was the 
trunk of a man. and on the other side of the cutler, with while, 
ghastly face upturned lo the moonlight, with fishy eyes staring wildly, 
lay the hc.-.d that had once rested on its shoulders! 

He saw the clotted blood on the knife, and the same life fluid 
that had streamed o%er the table onto the floor; but the small, 
crushed, withered cluster of leaves that had dropped from its 
wearer's hair he did not see— a faded, frail thing that now the 
meanest field flower could put to shame, and yet. in its curled petals, 
breathing the faintest semblance to a purple orchid! 



The agreement between Secretary of Slate Colby and 

Ambassador Shidehara Delimiting all Japanese now in the United 
States to become citizens, in case Jajan will prevent further immigra- 
tion to this country, looks very much like a bribe lo us. 



"Hickok Castle." the house of mystery near Salada Beach. 

which has developed into a house of murder, from signs that the 
police have disco\ered. should have been investigated long ago. as 
soon as it was considered "mysterious. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 4. 1920 



■III* 



(vociot 




■■s*3- 



News has been received from the City of 
Mexico of the marriage there of Senorita 
Encarnacion Becerril to Otis McAllister, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Hall McAllister of San 
Francisco. The bride is a member of one 
of the oldes families in Mexico City. 
McAllister went down to Mexico in 1919 to 
accept the position of professor of languages 
in the Colegio Ingles or English College of 
Mexico, where Mr. and Mrs. McAllister will 
make their future home. 

Mrs. Eleanor Martin gave a dinner last 
Friday for Admiral Hugh Rodman. The 
other guests were Senator and Mrs. Key 
Pittman, Mr. and Mrs. Henry T. Scott, Mr. 
and Mrs. J. Downey Harvey, Colonel and 
Mrs. W. K. Wright. Judge and Mrs. W. W. 
Morrow, Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Helm, Mrs. 
Sue Merriam, Mrs. Oscar Cooper, Mme. E. 
Ruano, Miss Mollie Merrick, Mr. Philip 
Paschel, Commander McRae, U. S. N., Sen- 
ator James D. Phelan and Mr. Edmund 
Ruano. 

Some of the young Naval officers of the 
U. S. S. New Mexico were entertained last 
Friday by Mrs. Emory Elliott of Alameda. 
A swimming party was given at the Yacht 
Club in Alameda, followed by supper and 
dancing. The girls invited to meet the 
officers were Miss Grace Cuyler of New 
York, Miss Claire Knight. Miss Laura Miller, 
Miss Beatrice Lund, Miss Margaret Weil, 
Miss Kathleen Bradley and Miss Anne Allen. 
Miss Laura Lindsay Miller, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry East Miller, who made 
her debut Thursday evening at a ball given 
by her parents at the Claremont Country 
club, will be entertained on both sides of the 
bay. Her aunt, Mrs. H. M. A. Miller, will 
give luncheons for her on September 7 and 
8, and on September 1 1 Miss Elizabeth Walt 
will give a luncheon for her at the Francisco 
Club. Miss Margaret Buckbee will entertain 
the debutante at a luncheon at the Woman's 
Athletic Club on September 14. Several 
affairs will be given in Oakland during Sep- 
tember. 

Mrs. Donald Armstrong has arrived from 
Los Angeles and is in San Rafael visiting 
her mother, Mrs. George Page. Her little 
son is with her and is paying his first visit to 
his grandmother. Mrs. Armstrong was Miss 
Leslie Page, one of the most popular girls in 
society. Her marriage took place in France 
soon after the armistice was signed. 

Miss Margaret Downing, the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. Downing, became the 
bride of Hector Keesling in Grace Cathedral 



at 8:30 o'clock Saturday evening. Dean 
Gresham performed the marriage ceremony. 
The bride was attended by Mrs. Chouteau 
Johnson (Ursula Hooper) and Miss Margaret 
Eells and Charles B. Evans of Nevada, a 
fraternity brother of the bridegroom, was 
best man. The ushers were Otto Grau and 
Lewis Keesling, also fraternity brothers of 
Keesling, and Richard Stevenson and Ralph 
Bandini of Los Angeles, who are uncles of 
the bride. Keesling is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Francis V. Keesling of San Jose and is 
a graduate of Stanford University, a member 
of the Sigma Nu Fraternity. During the war 
the bridegroom served in the U. S. Signal 
Corps and won his commission as captain in 
France. After a honeymoon, Mr. and Mrs. 
Keesling will make their home in San Fran- 
cisco, having found a charming apartment 
on Green street. 

Mrs. Willis Walker entertained informally 
at luncheon last week, complimenting Mrs. 
Edward S. Harkness of New York, who is 
visiting in San Francisco. The following 
day Mrs. Walker gave a small tea in honor 
of Mrs. Otis Skinner and her daughter. Miss 
Cornelia Skinner, who stopped here for a 
day en route to their home in the East after 
having passed the summer at Beverly Hills. 

In honor of Miss Adele Chevelier, the 
fiancee of Theodore Rethers, and Miss Lucy 
Ainsworth, who has announced her engage- 
ment to Ensign Brook Mansfield, U. S. N., 
Miss Elsie Leicester gave a small luncheon 
Friday afternoon at her home on California 
street. 

Mr. and Mrs. Felton Elkins have come to 
town from Monterey and are guests at the 
Fairmont for a few days. 

Miss Virginia Loop entertained at dinner 
at the Hotel St. Francis Wednesday the fol- 
lowing guests: Mr. Black, Miss Gertrude 
Martin, Mr. Dean, Miss Smith, Mr. Wyeth, 
Miss Mary Martin, Mr. Smith, Miss Ander- 
son, Mr. Parker. Miss Moran, Mr. Bevick, 
Miss Obear. Mr. Hugh. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Verdier, who are 
occupying the George T. Marye home in 
Burlingame. will not leave for their trip 
abroad until October. 

Mrs. Hancock Banning of Los Angeles, 
who is visiting in San Francisco as the guest 
of Mrs. Irving Wright, was entertained on 
Wednesday by Captain and Mrs. John Morris 
Ellicott at Mare Island. Mrs. Hugh Vail was 
the guest of Captain and Mrs. Ellicott on the 
same day. 

Mrs. William Miller Graham and her 



daughter. Miss Geraldine Graham, of Santa 
Barbara, have decided to spend the early 
winter in Paris. They are going abroad to 
get Miss Graham's trousseau. Her marriage 
to Mr. Whitney Warren, Jr., will take place 
in New York in February. Before they re- 
turn to this country Mrs. Graham and her 
daughter will stop in London, where Mrs. 
Graham has many friends. Several years 
ago, while her daughter was still at school, 
Mrs. Graham spent two or three seasons in 
London, where she rented a house and enter- 
tained lavishly. She was a great success 
socially and her London friends will enter- 
tain for her and Miss Graham during their 
visit. 

The lovely home of Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
E. Bothin in Ross valley was the scene of a 
benefit garden fete last Friday. The Episco- 
pal Old Ladies' Home of this city will benefit 
by the affair. The bazaar and fete was 
planned by artists and the arrangements 
were especially artistic and attractive. 

Miss Eleanor Davenport was hostess at a 
dinner last Friday at her apartment in Jack- 
son street, having as guests Dr. and Mrs. 
Erie Brownell. Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. 
Selfridge, Dr. and Mrs. Albert Houston, Miss 
Evelyn Selfridge. Mr. Thomas Ransom and 
Mrs. George McManus. 

Mrs. George Harding, who has been visit- 
ing her sister, Mrs. James W. Keeney, here, 
and her niece, Mrs. Talbot Walker, in Mon- 
tecito, left Tuesday for her home in Phila- 
delphia. Mrs. Keeney expects to spend the 
winter in the East and will visit her daughter, 
Mrs. Boiling Lee, in New York, and Mrs. 
Harding. 

Mme. Rosario Ruano entertained at din- 
ner on Friday evening in the Red Room of 
the Fairmont hotel in honor of Mr. and Mrs. 
J. Downey Harvey and Mrs. Oscar Cooper. 

Mrs. James Cunningham is ill at her home 
in Woodside and her friends are sending 
messages of sympathy. Mrs. Cunningham 
and her daughter, Miss Sara Cunningham, 
came from their home in New York several 
weeks ago to make their annual visit to their 
country house at Woodside. 

Miss Amanda McNear gave a luncheon 
Friday at her home in Ross valley for Miss 
Charlotte Zeil, who recently returned to San 
Rafael after a long residence in Europe. 
Others at the luncheon were Miss Margaret 
Madison. Miss Patience Winchester. Miss 
Anne Dibblee, Miss Doris Schmiedell, Miss 
Betty Schmiedell, Miss Florence Martin and 
Miss Adeline Penz. 

Mrs. William G. Henshaw and Mrs. Alia 
Henshaw Chickering will leave California in 
October and on November 3 will sail on La 
France for Europe to pass the winter season 
in Paris. William Henshaw and his brother. 
Judge Frederick Henshaw, who sailed for 
the Orient earlier in the season, will meet 
Mrs. Henshaw and Mrs. Chickering in Paris. 



September 4, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



DEL MONTE SOCIETY 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. La Boyteaux and 
their two interesting daughters. Misses Eliza- 
beth and Mary La Boyteaux, have left Del 
Monte after a delightful visit of several 
months. The La Boyteauxs are returning to 
their home in New York. They have been 
extensively entertained in San Francisco and 
Del Monte. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Gande of Shanghai are 
sojourning at Del Monte in company of Mr. 
and Al Lundborg of San Francisco, Mr. 
Gande is an enthusiastic golfer and trap- 
shooter and has been participating in the 
sports at Del Monte. 

This winter promises to bring a number of 
people prominent in eastern social circles to 
California for the polo season. Two banner 
tournaments are scheduled at Del Monte with 
an invitational event on January 29 to 
February 6 and the annual matches on 
March 19 to April 3. San Mateo is to have 
a tournament on April 4 to 17. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Reis of Pasadena 
have returned home after visiting their 
daughter, Mrs. Carson Ricks of San Fran- 
cisco, at Del Monte. Mrs. Ricks will remain 
at Del Monte to participate in the golf cham- 
pionships in September. 

Mr. Harry Hunt, the San Mateo polo 
player, is having plans designed for a pic- 
turesque forest lodge on his property at 
Pebble Beach. He will have for immediate 
neighbors Mr. and Mrs. S. F. B. Morse, Mr. 
and Mrs. Arthur Hill Vincent and Miss Helen 
Crocker and W. W. Crocker, Jr. Mr. Hunt 
is now visiting Del Monte and puts in much 
of his time on the polo field in play with 
Felton Elkins, Hugh Drury and Eric Pedley. 

Mr. George Barr McCutcheon, the New 
York author, and Mrs. McCutcheon will be 
delightful additions to the Pebble Beach 
colony. They are having plans drawn for 
their new home. 

Olympic Club members and their ladies 
are taking an interest in the sport outing 
which will be held at Del Monte on October 
I to 3. 



AT CAFE MARQUARD'S 

Perhaps at no other cafe is the old-time 
spirit of San Francisco kept so much in e\i- 
dence as at Marquard's. corner Geary and 
Mason streets. 

The extravaganza "Hello. California." is 
still proving of great interest, only second to 
the appealing cuisine, the courteous service., 
and the general atmosphere of fun and 
frolic. 

Go to Marquard's. You will find it dif- 
ferent from the ordinary restaurant. 



SCHOOL LIBRARIES INTRODUCED 
INTO FRANCE 

Circulating libraries have been introduced 
into the schools of France through the instru- 
mentality of the Junior Red Cross of 
America. The first of its kind is now being 
installed in five elementary schools in the 
Aisne sector, where three small villages near 
Toulis will be the beneficiaries. 

Toulis is the headquarters of the Junior 
Red Cross in that section. Committees are 
being organized among the students to 
handle the books and their orderly and regu- 
lar distribution will be insured through a 
system of nominal fines, an idea which the 
French children borrowed from their Ameri- 
can friends. 

The Rayson School of New York City, 
whose French instructor. Miss Francoise de 
Bacourt of Paris (now enlisted in the Red 
Cross, and who established the Toulis post of 
the Junior Red Cross conjunctively with Miss 
Dorothy B. Hoffhn of Minneapolis), has con- 
tributed money sufficient to pay for 100 
books and several magazine subscriptions. 
The pupils have also made fifty picture 
books. Legends, fairy tales, travel stories 
and agricultural studies comprise the library, 
while among the magazines subscribed for 
are "La Poupee Modele," containing sewing 
instruction, verse and stories for girls: "Mon 
Jounal," a magazine of general interest to 
juveniles; "Jardin et Basses Cours," pertain- 
ing to gardening and poultry raising, and 
"Agricultur et Elevage." which deals with 
farming and stock raising. 



DIRGE— 1920 

A hop vine by the river's brim 
A simple hop vine was lo him. 
And it was nothing more. 



GOOD WORK ACCOMPLISHED BY 
Y. M. C. A. 

In an effort to further control the gang 
spirit among working boys, the Boys' Di- 
vision of the San Francisco Y. M ('. A. is 
preparing to expand its program of welfare 
work for employed boys. 

The decision to broaden the scope of the 
work already carried on by the Y. M. C. A. 
at night to help working boys followed ■ 
conference last week between J. D. Foster, 
executive secretary of the Boys' Division of 
the Y. M. C. A. and Clarence T. Robinson, 
international secretary of boys' work of the 
I. \l ( \ . who came to San Francisco on 
his way to Honolulu. Robinson told Foster 
of the work hang accomplished by the Y 
M t A in eastern cities to control the 
gang spirit among working boys, and it was 
decided to enlarge the program already 
under way in this city. Boys are to be di- 
vided into groups classifying them both by 
the industry in which they are engaged and 
the neighborhood in which they reside 
Recreational work, intellectual activities and 
other features of wholesome work make up 
the program already prepared for workin? 
boys by the Y. M I 



U. S. MARINES IN READINESS 

Cable dispatches of another uprising in 
China are being closely followed by the sea- 
soldiers of the Marine Corps recruiting force 
at 320 Market street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Their interest is natural, for a battalion 
of Marines is held in readiness for just such 
a contingency as a legation guard at Peking. 
China, under the command of Colonel Louis 
Mason Gulick. And within the call of the 
wireless another battalion of Marines can 
speedily be landed from the cruisers of the 
Asiatic fleet and rushed to Peking or any 
other point of trouble. Already a small de- 
tachment of the handy fighting men have 
been dispatched to Tung-Cho from the lega- 
tion guard, where looting and disorder are 
going on, and if necessary will bring the 
American residents to Peking. A Shanghai 
cable last week brought news that two 
American Marines, operating a Lewis ma- 
chine gun, routed a band of brigands on the 
outskirts of Chunking in Central China. 

These two men. Corporal Elmer G. Glaser, 
of Milwaukee, and Private Earl F. Witherill 
of Cheyenne. Wyo.. got their piece into 
action when the American steamship Robert 
Dollar was fired on by bandits from the 
banks of the Yangtse and from sampans. 

The Marines won laurels during the Boxer 
rebellion in 1900. two regiments taking part 
in the capture of Tien-tsin and in the march 
to the relief of the besieged legations at 
Peking, and when the monarchist rebellion 
of 1916 threatened to set the East ablaze 
the marines were on the job again. 



ITS ATTRACTIVENESS 

Prospective Buyer: You talk about the 
desirable location of this house, but I don't 
see it. 

Real Estate Agent: You don't! Why, 
Great Scott, man. just across the street from 
a still, just around the corner from the Ca- 
nadian Bootleggers' Club, and 70 per cent of 
all the home brew in the city is made within 
five blocks of this house. — Life. 



TIIn< 
Pal 



FOR 



Eifo&@tr1k<dftm<8nsife> 

Management of 
Halsey E. Manwanng 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 4, 1920 



THE ART OF 

By Charles 



THE AZTECS 

F. Gallagher. 



To revive the arts of a vanished race — to 
apply their motives and adapt their designs 
to modern use: — this is indeed an imposing 
and yet a worthy task, when we look at the 
confusion of architectural and decorative 
styles and designs, that confront us in 
America today. Particularly is this the case 
when we deal 'vith an art that has been 
seldom studied and too little understood. 

Thanks to the indefatigable labors of 
archaeologists, alike in Europe, America and 
Mexico, who have enriched our national col- 
lections with treasure unearthed in the 
ruined cities of Yucatan and Central 
America, we can study these marvelous arts 
from their original sources. The wonderful 
edifices discovered in Uxmal, Chichenitza, 
and other cities, are the amazement of all 
who have beheld them — not alone from the 
standpoint of structural merit, but also from 
that of the wealth of exquisite ornamentation 
lavished upon them. As our craftsmen and 
decorators are increasingly led to turn their 
attention to a study of these buildings, these 
"monuments of a mighty Past" — in propor- 
tion, will have their influence upon modern 
decorative art. 

Nevertheless, the powerful impression pro- 
duced by these antique designs, upon the 
Mexican artists and craftsmen of today, is 
evinced in many of their works; for example, 
in the noble statue of Cuavhtemoc, the last 
of the Aztec emperors, in the Paseo de la 
Reforma, City of Mexico. 

Again, we find in the Indians of Mexico, 
the true art sense, as manifested in their 
fine specimens of pottery, with surface-dec- 
orations of most beautiful primitive design. 

With such wealth of material to draw 
upon, we may well feel that at last a 
basis has been reached for the development 
of a purely indigenous American Art. 

A pioneer in this worthy and most inter- 
esting work, is to be found in Mr. Francisco 
Cornejo, who has lately opened a studio at 
573 California street, San Francisco. Born 
in the City of Mexico, his imagination has 
been profoundly affected by the Spanish and 
Aztec influences native to that land of 
glamour and mystery. His earliest study was 
in the National University of Mexico; he 
also enjoyed the enviable privilege of access 
to the celebrated art collections of that city, 
in addition to visiting the ruins of the early 
civilizations of the Maya. Toltec, and Aztec 
tribes. Leaving that country some years 
ago, he came to Los Angeles, and became 
well known in art circles there. Lately he 
has opened a truly remarkable studio in San 
Francisco, which is unique of its kind. 
Ornate with the Aztec motives, it has been 



greatly admired by connoisseurs and visitors, 
for the beautiful results attained by the rich 
color effects of the Ancient American Art 
adapted to modern requirements by Mr. 
Cornejo. An impression of dignified harmony 
and repose, combined with a touch of 
solemnity, is produced upon the beholder as 
he enters; his interest is further aroused by 
the remarkable assortment of replicas as well 
as original specimens of primitive Mexican 
art; these with many objects of present-day 
usefulness, strikingly decoiated with unusual 
designs, should amply illustrate to the public 
mind the possibilities of this craftmanship of 
ancient days. One of the studio rooms is a 
replica of the Throne Room of the Ancient 
Palace of the Aztecs. 

Mr. Cornejo has devoted fifteen years of 



his life to this valuable study, and now looks 
forward to the results of his labors. One of 
his more recent efforts — one which may well 
make him a name throughout the breadth of 
the land — consists in a series of designs for 
the scenery, costumes, and properties, of the 
symbolic Ballet, known as "Xochitl." based 
on a Toltec legend, now appearing on the 
Pantages' circuit. These designs have been 
handled with a fine sense of color value; and 
while retaining the true primitive atmos- 
phere, yet conform to every requirement of 
the modern stage. These scenes are exceed- 
ingly unique and are some of the most strik- 
ing ever presented in California, or the West. 
It is Mr. Cornejo's ambition, so to revive 
and strengthen the interest in this subject, 
as to arouse the art-loving among us, to a 
realization of the material and means for a 
purely American art inspiration afforded us 
by our own great land. It is much to be re- 
gretted that, up to the present, our Cali- 
fornia craftsmen in particular, have found 
but scant opportunities for a thorough study 




Mr. Cornc/o'j Studio. 



September 4, 1920 




An Aztec Draining. 

_of this subject, so replete with interest in 
itself, not to speak of its practical adapta- 
bility to the uses of architecture today. 

Let us adopt and cling to a type of archi- 
tectural design more in harmony with this 
land of California. For this purpose, Senor 
Cornejo's ideas should prove an invaluable 
asset to this country, and well deserve appre- 
ciative encouragement for their distinctly 
educational and artistic advantage to the 
American public. 



THE AUSTRALIAN CORRO-BOREE 

The Australian Corro-Boree at first sound 
would give one the impression that it was an 
object of curiosity in the animal world, but 
this is not the case, The Corro-Boree is one 
of the native courting dances of Australia. 
It is a survival of the more barbaric rites of 
ancient limes, which has become somewhat 
refined with the passage of the years. Like 
the Phyrric Dance of the Ancient Spartans. 
or the Zulu war dance of the Voldt Warriors 
of South Africa, we find in every nation the 
expression of national inspiration, pleasure 
and enjoyment in the dance. In Modern 
America we recall with somewhat humorous 
memories, the oddity of our few-ycars-b.uk 
dances, the old "lag." the forerunner of the 
one-step, the three-step, the tango, the 
maxixe, and further back, the lancers. 
quadrilles, and figure dances, which have all 
gradually developed into practically three 
standard dances of today — videlicet; the 
one-step, the fox-trot, and the wall/. At 
Techau Tavern the acme of perfection in 
Dance music, syncopated to the latest time, 
orchestrated to the blithesome melodies of 
the latest song hits of the day. one finds real 
healthful pleasure in tripping the light fan- 
tastic to the merry tunes played by the 
Techau Tavern Dance Orchestra. Saturday 
afternoons offer an exceptional attraction 
with the lea Dansants which are greatly 
appreciated by those Down Town during the 
lea Hour. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

Wedding Presents: The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell streets. 



II 






Quality... 

The keynote of the Willard 
policy is the maintenance of 
a standard of (Quality, in mer- 
chandise, in values presented, 
and in service. 

Willard's 

139-153 deary Street 





E. F. HUTTON & CO, 



MEMBERS 



Now York Stock Exchange 

4% California St. and St. Francis Hotel 
Branch: Del Monte Hotel 

Private Wires 
Coast to Coast 




THE ROSE GARDEN 

There is an ancient garden-close where still 
The roses clambers o'er the lichened walis, 
And twine about the marble pedestals. 
And reach their tendrils to the shallow sill 
Of many a mullioned window; where the trill 
Of the leaf-hid enamored wood-thrust falls; 
And cricket unto cricket clearly calls 
As the pale twilight tiptoes down the hill. 

Therein a dial stands that seems so old 
It has forgotten times. About its face 
The roses cluster as they coil and climb; 
And when comes midnight with its moon of 

gold 
Two spectral lovers meet there and embrace; 
They — they alone have not forgotten time! 
— Munsey's Magazine. 



MOMENTS 
By Herbert Asquith 

If we could save our moments, store them 

deep 
In cellars of the mind to choose at will. 
Not as the dream that drowns into a sleep. 
But as the taste of wine, laid cool and still; 
Could groping fingers hold the grains of ore 
And set the scattered jewels in a crown. 
Comb out the beach of Time, and from the 

shore 
Net all the tangled treasure floating down ; 

Then living so with heaven at our hand 
We'd fly al death, like laden bees, to bear 
That heaven rapti\c to the heaven there! 
Longei than any hron/.c these would 
These, that are now as writing on the sand 
Beneath the wave of each oncoming tide. 

— Literary Digest. 



THE PANTHER 

By Edwin Markham. 

The moon shears up on Tahoe now; 

The panther leaps to the tamarack bough. 

She crouches, hugging the crooked limb; 

She hears the nearing steps of him 

Who sent the little puff of smoke 

That stretched her mate beneath the oak. 

Her eyes burn beryl, two yellow balls. 
As Fate counts out his last footfalls. 
A sudden spring, a demon cry. 
Carnivorous laughter to the sky. 
Her teeth are fastened in his throat 
(The moon rides in her silver bo 
And now one scream of long delight 
Across the caverns of the night! 

< lures. 



12 



PLEASURED 
W\ND 




"Daddies" at the Alcazar 

David Belasco has scored another comedy 
success in "Daddies" which is creating mixed 
emotions of laughter and tears at the 
Alcazar this week, and the capacity crowds 
are moved to great enthusiasm. The troubles 
which little foi sign war waifs give to their 
adopted fathers, make this production an 
artistic deligh'. 

Heading the small actor contingent is 
Sylvia Yaffe in the role of Lorry, a little 
refugee of France; Phyllis Chatterley and 
the triplets, Francois and Company, are 
proving their histrionic ability every day, and 
are a splendid addition to the Alcazar com- 
pany. 



Cleverness at the Orpheum 

The sprightly dancing of Harry Ellsworth, 
the pretty voice of Dorothy Southern, the 
nonsense of Eddie Vogt, and the dashing 
costumes of the half dozen girls in the "Love 
Shop," are the principal features at the 
Orpheum this week. The Love Shop itself 
is a mixture of songs, dances, comedy and 
girls, with a burlesque fencing match as one 
feature. A very realistic setting is given in 
"The Champion," of a prize fight. Then 
there are back-country humorists (Si Jenks 
and Victoria Allen). Their line of fun is 
typical of the roles they play, and their 
closing song and dance is their best number. 

George Wilson and Ben Larson provide 
"the most amusing episode of the entire bill 
in the "forward somersaults," which close 
their comedy tumbling act. The "stunt" is 
an unusually clever and original climax. 

Four American Aces toss each other care- 
lessly about in a casting act of entertaining 
features. 

Marie Gaspar sings a little and dances a 
few steps. 

Santucci provides accordion selections. 

The holdover of the week is Lovett's 
Concentration. 



The Humming Bird at the Columbia 

Maude Fulton, in the portrayal of 
"Toinette." in her charming play, "The 
Humming Bird," is having a most triumphant 
career. The final performance of this popu- 
lar actress and author, will be next Saturday 
night, after which the Humming Bird flutters 
to New York, for what is expected to be an 
all-season run. 

"The Humming Bird" waltz, as danced by 
Miss Fulton and Paisley Noon, in the second 
act is a most exquisite melody, and is being 
whistled merrily on the streets. Much of the 
success of this play is due to the well-nigh 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

perfect cast, which includes Henry B. 
Walthall, Marie Walcamp, Harland Tucker, 
Lea Penman, William Morse, Ernest Ander- 
son, Paisley Noon, Grace Travers, Florence 
Oberle, Mildred Cates, Frank Whitson and 
other notables. This cast will remain intact 
when "The Humming Bird" is presented at 
the Morosco Theatre, New York. 



ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENT 
Alcazar 

"Parlor, Bedroom and Bath," opening at 
the Alcazar next Sunday matinee, is a wild 
whirl of piquant absurdities in exact 
harmony with a week when holiday spirit is 
prevalent. There will be holiday matinees 
on Monday, Labor Day, and Thursday, Ad- 
mission Day. when thousands will invade the 
city from all parts of the Slate. The original 
spoken comedy, which depends as much 
upon the witty lines as humorous characteri- 
zation, is by C. W. Bell and Mark Swan. 
Its zone of laughter, since A. H. Woods gave 
it a solid year's run in New York, has grown 
to embrace all America, although it has 
never been acted at the Alcazar. The versa- 
tile company, which has become a distinctive 
local institution, revels in farce comedy. 

Rachel Crothers' recent New York comedy 
success, "39 East", will have first coast pre- 
sentation September 12. It is a delightful 
romance covering a single day in a New 
York boarding house of "the better class" 
with a picturesque episode in Central Park. 
Its vogue at the New York Adelphi led to 
later transfer to the Booth Theatre, where 
it ran for months. 



Orpheum 

Emma Haig, delightful star of the dancing 
firmament, comes to headline the Orpheum 
bill Sunday. Miss Haig planted both of her 
swift moving feet square in the bull's eye of 
public favor several seasons ago and has 
managed to keep them there ever since. 

Declared to be "home run hitters in the 
game of song," Bob Nelson and Frank 
Cronin, comedians, will sing and converse in 
a skit entitled "Smiles." Their bit is so 
named for its effect on audiences. 

Jack Trainor will be seen in Jack Lait's 



September 4, 1920 

new skit, "Help," based on the ludricous 
points in the present labor shortage. 

Charles Kenna will deliver his now famous 
gasoline torch monologue. Edward Marshall, 
eminent "chalkologist," will bring into play 
his faculty as a cartoonist, portrait painter 
and sketch artist. 

Toots Davis and Bert Chadwick, genuine 
black face comedy men, called the "jail 
house boys," and Challen and Keke, wireists, 
also are booked. Eddie Vogt in "The Love 
Shop" with Harry and Grace Ellsworth, the 
musical extravaganza of the current bili, 
hold over. 



"What sort of fellow is Stebbins?" 
"The best in the world. He'd give you his 
last drink." — Judge. 




All Next Week— Starting Sunday 

Emma Haig 

CHARLES KENNA I EDWARD MARSHALL 

Nelson & Cronin | Jack Trainor 

DAVIS i. CHADWICK I CHALLEN A. KEKE 

TOPICS OF THE DAY 

ORPHEUM CONCERT ORCHESTRA 

"The Love Shop" 

Matinees— 25c to 75o Evenings—- 25c tu $1 
(Except Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays) 
MATIN'KK DAILY— Ph. in- Douglas 70 
Try Popular Balcony Beats 

ALCAZAR 

THIS WEEK— THE BELASCO SUCCESS 

Delightful Comedy— "DADDIES" 

WEEK COM. NEXT SUN. MAT. SEPT. 5 

Holiday Mats. Labor Day and Admission Day 

The Wild Whirl of Piquant Absurdities 

"PARLOR, BEDROOM AND BATH" 

The Most Successful Farce on the Stage 
NEW ALCAZAR COMPANY 

INEZ RAGAN DUDLEY AYRES 

Special Appearance of Isabelle Fletcher 

SUN. MAT., SEPT. 12— First Time in the West. 

Rachel Crothers' Recent New York Comedy Hit 

. "39 EAST" 

Full of Youth, Love and Sunshine 

Every Evening — Matinees. Sunday, Thurs., Sal. 



25 YEARS OF SUCCESS 

IN THE CARE OF 

HAIR, FACE AND NAILS 

HAS MADE 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 



-A RELIABLE STORE- 



TRY A COSGROVE'S TAR SHAMPOO $1.50 



360 GEARY STREET, S. F. 

Phone Kearny 2842 



2331 TELEGRAPH AVE. 

Berkeley. Cal. 



September 4. 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



S. P. NEWS OF INTEREST TO 
CATTLEMEN 

Cattlemen generally will be interested in 
the announcement by the Southern Pacific 
Company that it has reinstated the rule can- 
celled by the United States Railroad Admin- 
istration regarding the refunding of fares of 
care-takers sent out to return with shipments 
of live stock. 

This practice is local to the Pacific Coast 
lines. Middle western and eastern lines do 
not make these refunds, but allow free trans- 
portation only on care-takers accompanying 
live stock and returning to point of origin. 
In the middle west and east live stock is 
shipped to union stock yards and market 
points and there sold, the care-takers re- 
turning to shipping points. In the absence 
of union stock yards on the Pacific Coast, 
except Portland, it is necessary for dealers 
to send buyers into the country and take 
delivery either on the spot or at the railroad 
point of shipment and then return as care- 
takers with the live stock. 

The refund of fares by the Southern Pa- 
cific Coast lines places dealers on the Pacific 
Coast in a position to buy stock in competi- 
tion with the movement to middle-western 
and eastern territory. 



MARINES NOW TAUGHT TO HANDLE 
MERCHANT SHIPS 

For the first time in history the "soldiers 
of the sea" and the sailors of commerce have 
something in common. 

This is the gist of an announcement made 
at the U. S. Marine Corps recruiting station, 
320 Market street, San Francisco. Cal., to- 
day, when it was learned that courses in 
coastwise and deep-sea navigation have been 
established at the Marine Corps Institute. 

A report received today from the Institute 
explains how any young man enlisting in the 
marines can take up a free course of study 
which will prepare him to perform the duties 
of a deck officer in the merchant marine. 

It is particularly desired, continues the re- 
port, that as many young men as possible be 
enlisted to take this course, as the expansion 
of our sea trade has created a large demand 
for trained nagivators.' The instructors, it 
was said, are all sea-going men, capable of 
preparing marines to take up the highly paid 
profession of the "merchantman." when they 
leave the corps. 



MODERN 

"You're quite up-to-date here: you've got 
a jazz band on the premises. 

"Oh. what you hear is the lady on the 
top floor smashing some crockery over her 
husband's head, while the occupant of the 
flat beneath is having a little revolver prac- 
tice through the window at the cats. 1 I 
Baionnettc (Paris). 



GOLDWYN NOTES 

The Goldwyn studio in Los Angeles has 
its own cafe on the grounds, and when the 
clans gather at the noon hour to partake of 
nourishment, there is oftentimes a motley 
crew of divers and sundry characters 
assembled. The Tower of Babel aspect 
taken on by the cafe last week, however, has 
not been duplicated before or since. It 
happens that several dialect pictures are 
being filmed at the same time, and the con- 
glomeration of speech heard in the cafe 
these days goes something like this: 

Russel Simpson, who is the stern Scotch 
parent in the picturization of "Bunty Pulls 
the Strings," strode in, sat himself down with 
much dignity and addressed the astonished 
waitress in this wise: "Awa wid ye! I'm 
in a bit hurry, de ye mind?" At another 
table Beatrice Joy (playing Bunty) and Tom 
Moore, playing the Irish street cleaner in 
the Goldwyn picture, "Canavan," conversed 
thusly : 

Miss Joy — "How bonny ye look in your 
white wing breeks. Tarn Moore!" 

Mr. Moore — "Sure now, Miss Bunty, 
ye've been kissing the blarney stone. Begorra 
'tis meself makes the fascinatin' lad in me 
Sunday clothes, howiver!" 

Just then Will Rogers, doing a Swede sea 
captain (the company is now in San Fran- 
cisco taking water front scenes), boomed 
out, "I tank I bane go back to Minnesota! 
I tank it bane hot as hall in California." 
while "Just fawncy that, now," murmured 
Ramsey Wallace, the English attorney in 
"Out of the Dark." It will be several weeks 
before any of these four pictures are fin- 
ished, and several months before they are 
released. Which reminds the "Eavesdropper" 
that if anyone is particularly interested in 
knowing when any certain Goldwyn picture 
is to be released the information will be 
gladly given. 



IN 1930 

Mrs. Prood — Tell me about the play, my 
dear. 

Daughter — Well, in the first act the girl 
who plays the vampire comes on the stage 
taking off her wrist-watch — 

Mrs. Prood — Oh. isn't that awful' Those 
actresses have no sense of decency left! — 
Judge. 



COULDN'T USE HIM 

"There's a college graduate at the door. 
He wants a job." 

"What can he do?" asked the self-made 
man. 

"He says he is pretty good in Greek." 

"Lmph! Tell him I haven't sold one dol- 
lar's worth of goods to Greece since I've 
been in the export business." — Birmingham 
Age-Herald. 



UNITED SHATES SHIPPING BOARD 
ANNOUNCEMENT 

1 he United States Shipping Board an- 
nounces that it will withdraw on October 1st 
from the National Adjustment Commission 
having jurisdiction over longshore matters 
on the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts. A resolu- 
tion to this effect has been passed by the 
Board and the necessary sixty days notice 
has been given to the Secretary of the Com- 
mission. 

1 he National Adjustment Commission was 
established at the instance of the Shipping 
Board during the war in order to maintain 
close contact in the longshore industry be- 
tween the shipping and stevedoring interests, 
the International Longshoremen's Association 
and the United States Shipping Board. 

The Shipping Board is immediately taking 
steps to set up the machinery necessary for 
joining with the shipping and stevedoring 
interests in negotiating directly with the 
International Longshoremen's Association in 
reference to all matters affecting the long- 
shore industry on the Atlantic and Gulf 
Coasts, ihis method of direct negotiations 
is in line with its procedure in dealing with 
the other large groups of labor in its operat- 
ing departments. It has already executed 
agreements for the coming year with the 
Sailors, Firemen, Cooks and Stewards and 
Licensed Deck Officers and expects to do the 
same with the Marine Engineers and the 
Radio Operators. 

By joining the shipping and stevedoring 
interests in dealing directly with the long- 
shoremen, it is acting in accordance with the 
principle of collective bargaining rfcognized 
by the Government and feels that it can in 
this way best protect the interests of the 
longshoremen, the American Merchant Ma- 
rine and the ports on the Atlantic and Gulf 
Coasts. 

It is prepared to consider in a fair and 
sympathetic spirit all of the questions affect- 
ing this great industry. 



JEU D'AMOUR 
By Enid R. Clay. 



March winds were blowing when we met — 
(And so the game was started) 

You blew a breath of love to me 
That left me broken-hearted. 

June roses scented all the air — 

(The game seemed so worth winning). 

Their glory mingled with your k: 
And never thought it sinning. 

And still for some the March winds blow. 

And roses perish never: 
For all my play — and some must lose — 

Forever and forever. 

jlish Review. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 4, 1920 



Finance and Insurance 



A very generally optimistic tone prevails 
in eastern banking circles regarding condi- 
tions and the prediction is freely made that 
there will be a general improvement be- 
ginning with October. 

The elections were discounted long ago, 
and have now no effect on the financial con- 
ditions of the day. There is a gradual de- 
flation going on and this has been brought 
about by the action of conservative banking 
interests throughout the country in curtailing 
loans. The Federal Reserve Bank may be 
credited with having prevented a panic, fol- 
lowing the close of the profiteering stage in 
business operation consequent on the specu- 
lation throughout the war and the armistice 
period. 

1 he crop conditions all over the country 
may be said to favor a bumper production. 
Minnesota is reported with a record sugar 
beet crop, the conditions in some parts of 
California, on account of dry weather, are 
bad but the crops will be fair to good. Grain 
in the West and Middle West is reported to 
have been slightly damaged by rains but 
here again a good crop is expected. The 
late rice crop is doing well. These crop con- 
ditions have their effect on banking con- 
ditions. 

On the street and elsewhere one hears in 
San Francisco the wail of bad business con- 
ditions but when noses are counted at the 
end of every month the statistical returns 
show no such thing. Up to the present time 
the bank clearings of San Francisco show 
record figures. Ihe figures for the eight 
months of the year that have gone by indi- 
cate a far greater volume of business for 
1920 than for last year. From January 2 to 
August 30 inclusive the San Francisco bank 
clearings aggregated the very large sum of 
$5,365,714,808. The clearings for August 
totaled in round numbers $645,000,000. 
1 his sum exceeds all August figures. There 
isn't much found in such figures to bolster 
up the claims of those who are running 
about claiming that business is waiting 
around for the undertaker to buy it. Such 
figures bespeak a wonderfully prosperous 
condition for the banks of the big Pacific 
Coast financial center. 

Of course, the big figures are partially 
made up by the inflation of prices but the 
figures were obtained, as far as August is 
concerned, while a slow deflation of prices 
was steadily going on. The showing is more 
remarkable when it is taken into considera- 
tion that "caution" is manifested in all trans- 
actions involving the use of bank capital. 

Export business suffered a slump all over 
the country some two months ago but in this 



direction, too, may be seen signs of a healthy 
revival. Ihe most dependable authorities 
in export trade, in the big eastern trading 
and manufacturing centers, state that a very 
healthy reaction is even now taking place. 

A few months ago there was cause for 
alarm, as to industrial conditions, because 
prices and bank loans were then soaring. 
About this time it was realized in the big 
money centers that we were riding for a fall. 
The Government and the Federal Reserve 
bank then decided to exert such reasonable 
pressure as might forestall direful results. 
1 he Government immediately began a re- 
striction of expenditure, the issue of short 
term certificates at market rates, the rise in 
the discount rate at the Federal Reserve 
bank, and, in addition, the determination of 
the public that prices must come down or 
they would not buy, have resulted in the 
readjustment and deflation which is now 
going on. 

ihe conditions are encouraging for future 
industrial prosperity and for a recrudescence 
of foreign trade. American manufacturers 
are reported as making plans for a healthy 
growth of business in foreign markets. 

To be sure theie have been losses attend- 
ant on a resumption of near-normal business 
conditions. Heavy losses have been in- 
curred by those who have mistaken their 
calling as merchants and who forsook, for 
the time being, healthful business practices 
for gambling. This is notably true of those 
who have made fortunes, or lost them, in 
sugar or rice speculations. Such losses are 
unfortunate occurrences but they are avail- 
able and are due simply to insatiate greed of 
the individual or the corporations speculating 
in these very necessary commodities. There 
is a point where business transactions lose 
their value as sound economic practices and 
take on the criminal form of gambling. The 
gambler should take his loss without 
grumbling. 

We can only repeat that the signs of busi- 
ness improvement are increasing. Crops will 
surpass recent years. Banking restrictions 
have forced out the unsound elements of 
credit and trade. Commercial and manufac- 
turing profiteering has been brought to dead 
stop and prices are declining. 

A much healthier business tone obtains 
through this deflation than even a month 
ago. Public attention should now be directed 
t& putting a stop to profiteering by labor. 

Insurance The Pullman Trust and Sav- 
ings Bank has just lost $100 000 sent to it in 
bills by the Merchants Loan and Trust Com- 
pany of Chicago. The amount was regis- 
tered and was to be used in paying off em- 



ployees. The shipment was insured under 
an open policy with the Saint Paul Fire anc 
Marine. That company is offering a reward 
of $5000 for the detection of the thieves. 
The registered mail pouch was stolen from 
the Pullman depot. This case, in its devel- 
opment, is sure to afford interest to all 
insurance men. 

On September I , the American Re-Insur- 
ance Exchange started business actively at 
its headquarters at White Plains, the pretty 
New York suburb. John A. Greer is the 
attorney-secretary. There has been no an- 
nouncement of the group of assuming com- 
panies pending the signing of an agreement 
by a number of others, reported as consider- 
ing the proposition. It is stated that, after 
these have signed, that, for various reasons, 
the names may not even then be given out. 
It has been announced that the free assets, 
capital and net surplus combined, of the 
twenty-five companies agreeing to the Ex- 
change agreement, amount to approximately 
$20,000,000. Percentages assumed by the 
agreeing receiving group of companies are 
reported as varying between I Yi and 4 per 
cent, and in no case exceeding the latter 
figure. There is intimation of the gross 
amount which the American Re-Insurance 
Exchange will accept. The percentage 
amounts for the individual assuming com- 
panies were kept low for two reasons: First, 
to force a wide distribution for the safety of 
the ceding offices themselves, and the better 
protection of the assured; secondly, for the 
protection of the assuming company itself 
which may not be overlooked with too large 
a line on any one risk. 

The opinion is expressed that if the assum- 
ing companies of the Exchange do not find 
the operation of the organization profitable, 
it will not be for lack of effort on the part of 
the ceding group, according to one of the 
founders of the agreement. The purpose of 
the Exchange is to develop American re- 
insurance resources and it is recognized that 
this purpose cannot be consummated unless 
a profitable income is assured. 

The "Insurance Field" is authority for the 
above, and it makes mention of the ceding 
companies, as definitely interested, as the 
American of Newark, the Connecticut Fire. 
Glen Falls, Niagara, Phoenix of Hartford, 
and Security of New Haven. Secretary-at- 
torney Greer went to the Exchange from the 
accounting department of the Niagara. 

Developments will be watched with a great 
deal of interest by insurance men all over the 
country, as the Exchange is in the nature of 
an experiment. 

Reciprocals and intennsurers have done a 
thrifty business in California and the Ameri- 
can Indemnity Exchange has not been an 
exception. Insurance Commissioner Alex- 
ander McCabe pulled off a regular movie 
stunt when he seized upon the papers and 



September 4, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



records of the Union Investment and Mort- 
gage Company, its attorney in fact, in Los 
Angeles while under the protection of guard 
armed with a revolver. 

A pleasanter duty befell Commissioner 
McCabe, when he acted last week as host to 
the visiting insurance commissioners of the 
United States at San Francisco. Last Satur- 
day the visitors were treated to a tour of San 
Francisco and this was followed by an in- 
formal dinner and a trip to beautiful Belve- 
dere to witness "A Night in Venice." The 
party departed for a visit to the Yosemite, on 
Sunday night. 

Everyone in insurance circles is pleased 
with the appointment as secretary of Willard 
R. Done for the California Association of 
Insurance Agents. He was at one time 
insurance commissioner for Utah and at 
another time Pacific Coast representative on 
the National Board. He is a fine public 
speaker, has attained quite a reputation as a 
writer and knows something of the fine art 
of the politician. He will live in Los Angeles 
and has already assumed his duties. 

The passing of Samuel Butterworth Stoy 
has left a void which it will be found very 
difficult to fill. He was one of the leading 
underwriters of San Francisco and manager 
of the London and Lancashire group. He 
died as the result of three successive opera- 
tions. The death took place on Sunday. 
August 22. At the time of his death Mr. 
Stoy had charge of the Pacific Coast affairs 
of the London and Lancashire Indemnity. 
He was a director of the corporation as well 
as vice-president. 



FILM FLICKS 

From the Eavesdropper 



CHANGE IN PACIFIC COAST OFFICE 
METROPOLITAN LIFE 

George B. Scott, third vice-president of the 
Metropolitan Life Insurance Company (Pa- 
cific Coast Head office), announced his resig- 
nation on the 24th ol August. Mr. Scott 
has had charge of this department since 
January I, 1920, from which time he has 
watched this branch of the insurance com- 
pany grow from an insignificant business. 
with a field force of less than 300 men. to it; 
present size, employing 1200 men in the 
field, and 380 in the clerical force. Mr, 
Scott will fill a larger sphere of usefulness in 
the Home office, while Mr. Ernest H. Wilkes 
will take charge of the Pacific Coast head 
office. Mr. Wilkes has distinguished himselt 
as superintendent of agencies jn the Great 
Western Territory, and has a talent for 
leadership which will be t el I immediately. 



ARTISTIC 

"What kind of a woman is Mrs. Gad- 
spur?" 

"Especially artistic." 

"How's that?" 

"The family fly-swatter is adorned with a 
bow of pink ribbon." — Town Crier. 



Frank Lloyd, the motion picture director 
who made "Les Miserables" and "The Tale 
of Two Cities." arrived in San Francisco to- 
day with a Goldwyn company, to take scenes 
for "Out of the Dark," a picture adapted 
from the legitimate stage success, "A Voice 
Out of the Dark." Chinatown scenes will be 
taken, where Alan Hale, playing the villain, 
will abduct Irene Rich, the leading woman. 

Mollie Malone, a dainty ingenue recently 
signed up with Goldwyn's, collects garters! 
She says she has a pair for every day in the 
month — and everyone wonders who gives 
them to her. 

Gertrude Atherton, the famous writer of 
California's early days, is now in Los Angeles 
writing a new picture play. She has an 
office at the studio, pounds her stuff out on 
an old Blickensdeifer and eats a doughnut 
and an apple for luncheon. 

The Sunset Inn. near Los Angeles, is a 
place where the motion picture stars stage 
most of their parlies now. To liven up the 
evening each star has a "night" at which 
lime he pulls his own particular stunt. The 
last the Eavesdropper heard was that Fatty 
Arbuckle made his affair a stripped poker 
game — of course il was a family party, n all 
— but we didn't like to inquire for a too de- 
tailed description. Viola Dana's night is 
coming next. 

Helene Chadwirk. who played in Rupert 
Hughes' photo-drnma, "Scratch My Back." 
is to be featured by Goldwyn. • Here is a 
little story on I lelene, who. like Mollie 
Malone. wears the most ravishing garters: 
Last Saturday she lost one right in the 
middle of the green lawn that surrounds the 
Goldwyn stages I he clever Helene. how- 
ever, saved the situation by merely quoting 
demurely: "It is better to have dressed — and 
lost — than never to have dressed at all!" 
"Aha I You " thai in a paper somewhere. 
That's too clever to be original." remarked 
Cullcn Landis. "But it fits the occasion, does 
it not ?" sweetly i|ucricd Miss Chadwick. 

Will Rogers is eating at the ingenues' 
table in the studio now. fondly but 
erroneously belie* ing that the ice cream and 
rich pastries the doll faced babies consume 
will make him perspire, and therefore re- 
duce his flc>h Everyone else wonders what 
particular innocent-eyed ingenue told him 
such a whopper ' 

N.iomi Childers. whose character portrayal 
in "Earth Bound." a picture written by Basil 
King, is nothing short of genius, says that it 
took her three months to get over feeling 
like Mrs. Desborough. the weepy, clinging 
vine woman in "Earth Bound." Tom Moore 



who happened to be standing near last 
Friday afternoon when she made the remark, 
said: "Well, Naomi, if you still feel like a 
clinging vine, I'm at your service." Which 
may or may not have been the reason the 
casting director made Miss Childers Moore's 
leading woman in his next picture, called 
"Canavan." 

Little Johnnie Jones, who plays Edgar 
in the Booth Tarkington film stories called 
"The Edgar Series," is very fond of swim- 
ming — especially when the studio tank is 
full and handy. One day last week his 
director, Mason N. Litson, had to pull him 
out'no less than four times during the after- 
noon, for Johnnie didn't stop for a bathing 
suit, but went in clothes and all. "This kid 
stuff isn't all it's cracked up to be," said the 
director with much irritation as he propelled 
the reluctant Johnnie to the set. "Ah, go 
on, Mr. Litson — I bet you'd like to go 
swimmin' yourself — only you're 'fraid your 
wife'll scold you if you get your clothes 
wet!" replied the miniature hero of the 
Booth Tarkington tales. 

Will Rogers never gives his fans auto- 
graphed photographs. He sends them one 
of his pet ropes instead, but he says the 
high cost of living will put a stop to even 
thai pretty soon. "Say. can you beat it." he 
mourned. "I used to get a fine rope for 
$2.00 and now they want $2.50! What's 
the world coming to. any way!" Cheer up. 
Will. If that's the only raise in prices you're 
worried about, you'll Ine ,i long lime and not 
turn a gray hair! For the uninitiated let it 
be explained thai Rogers used to be on the 
vaudeville circuil, doing fancy twirling 
stunts with ropes before he became a star. 



LEROY LINNARD TO PROMOTE TRANS- 
PACIFIC TOURIST TRAVEL TO CITY 

LeRoy Linnard. genial manager of the 
Fairmont hotel, sailed last Saturday on the 
Maui for Honolulu, for the purpose of 
establishing connections to handle the 
Hawaiian American lourisl travel. Linnard 
predicts that the coming months will show 
an unparalleled increase in the number of 
visitors emanating from the Orient and the 
Islands. See America First via San Fran- 
cisco is one of his slogans, and those who 
witnessed his departure know from the 
typical Linnard smile that the flux of sighl- 
seers and globe-trotters will pass through the 
Golden Gate when they land on the Pacific 
Coast. The Fairmont hotel is planning an 
extensive organization for encouraging 
tourists to visit the East and Pacific 
via San Francisco. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 4, 1920 



^ffofnohjh 




Successful, but nevertheless incessant, 
warfare is being waged against the automo- 
bile thief by 'he San Francisco Motor Car 
Dealers Association. In the last three months 
the number of reported thefts has been cut 
nearly in half, according to the report just 
issued by Elliott Epsteen, special prosecutor 
for the Association. 

Epsteen's report shows that in May, 1919, 
there were 1 1 8 thefts, as against this year's 
62 for the same month. In June, 1919, 
there were 146, and in 1920, 78. In July, 
1919, there were 125, as against this year's 
77. All of which sounds very encouraging 
to everybody except the automobile thief, 
which is as it should be. 

A campaign to educate the car owners in 
ways to protect their cars and accessories 
from being stolen is now being undertaken 
by the Dealers Association, in a further 
attempt to reduce the number of automobiles 
stolen in this city. 

All owners are urged to buy wheel-locking 

devices or other mechanical safeguards to 

prevent car-thefts. The same precautions 

are urged in the matter of tires, as these are 

easy to steal and dispose of, unless properly 

guarded. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

Reorganization of the sales force of J. W. 
Leavitt & Company has been announced by 
A. D. Plughoff, general manager for Leavitt. 
J. H. Cadien becomes assistant general 
manager, and G. W. DeLano is promoted to 
the responsibilities of retail sales manager 
for San Francisco. 

Both Cadien and DeLano have been con- 
nected with the J. W. Leavitt organization 
for years. Cadien having been identified with 
the firm since 1910, while DeLano's connec- 
tion began in 1914. They have built up 
strong friendships locally and have received 
scores of congratulations upon their re- 
spective promotions. Both have assumed 
their duties and are hard at work on the new 

tasks involved. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

Charles F. Carroll, president of the Carroll 
Automobile Company of Lorain, Ohio, is 
spending a few days in San Francisco as the 
guest of Fred W. Hauger, president of the 
Hauger Motors Company, western distribu- 
tors for the Carroll Six. 

Carroll is enthusiastic over the motoring 
possibilities of the West and is planning to 



devote an unusually large percentage of his 
output to the Pacific Coast region, as soon 
as the Carroll factory is able to begin full- 
scale production. After a few days of 
motoring over California's scenic roads, 
Carroll will return to Ohio. 
¥ ¥ ¥ 

L. M. Stewart, manager of the San Fran- 
cisco branch of the Willys-Overland Com- 
pany, returned last week from the second of 
two hurry-up trips across the continent, both 
completed within the past thirty days. 
Stewart's last visit to the Overland factory 
at Toledo has given him a more optimistic 
outlook than ever on the question of Over- 
land output. 

"Although production has diminished 
somewhat on account of the difficulties in 
obtaining raw materials and in getting them 
to the factory, the Overland factory is still 
turning out cars at a rate of better than 
500 a day," Stewart reports. "This makes 
Overland second to but one other automobile 
manufacturing concern in the world in point 
of number of cars finished daily." 

Stewart declares that unless cost of labor 
and raw materials should suddenly drop, a 
further increase in car prices is due for the 
near future. One cause of this will probably 
be the raise in freight tariffs. Not only will 
this affect the f. o. b. price of machines; it 
mil also affect the original cost, he avers, for 
it will increase the cost of getting raw ma- 
terials to factory, as well as finished product 
to distributor and thence to consumer. 
¥ .y. ¥ 

Lou H. Rose, Chalmers distributor, is also 
back from a trip East. The smile which has 
been one of Rose's chief assets in the past 
was even more in evidence than ever before 
when he told of the plans of the Chalmers 
Motor Company for the coming year. New 
capital has been put into the Chalmers 



Motor Company, Rose states, and this means 
increased production on a larger scale than 
would otherwise be possible. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

Another San Francisco executive who has 
recently completed an eastern tour is T. H. 
Wilkinson, manager of the United States 
Rubber Company's branch here. He has 
been in attendance at a convention of branch 
managers of the big company, held up in the 
New Hampshire mountains at Camp Fran- 
conia Notch. George H. Mayo, head of all 
the branches of the company, presided, and 
much was accomplished in a business way, 
Wilkinson reports. 

Following this convention, Wilkinson paid 
an extended visit to the company's plant in 
Providence, R. I., where the new Monotwin 
solid tire is being built. He also visited the 
clothing factory of the U. S. Rubber Com- 
pany at Cambridge, Mass. 

A meeting of branch managers of the 
Pacific Coast will be held in San Francisco 
this week, with representatives from Seattle, 
Fortland, Spokane, Salt Lake City and Los 
Angeles, in attendance. Wilkinson will pre- 
side. 

* * ¥ 

Bert Roberts, well known eastern factory 
representative, has been a San Francisco 
visitor during the past week, making his 
headquarters while here with E. W. Milbum, 
manager of the Greer-Robbins Company, 
largest distributors of Hupmobiles in the 
world. 

"Bob" Martland, secretary of the Cali- 
fornia Automobile Trades Association, is 
busy with plans for the codifying and draft- 
ing of the uniform traffic law proposed by 
the recent National Traffic Officers conven- 
tion. Martland is a member of the drafting 
committee of the traffic officers National 
organization which will meet at Cleveland in 
December for final action on the proposed 
code. 

¥ * ¥ 

With the gasoline shortage trouble now 
merely a matter of history, there is evident 
more of a late-season tendency toward long- 
distance touring than has been the case 
during any past year. Reports from Camp 
Curry in the Yosemite Valley, and from 
other popular high-mountain resorts show 
that a far greater number of guests are 




L. E. PENNIMAN 

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA DISTRIBUTOR OF 

Ensign Carburetors 



605 VAN NESS AVENUE 
Near Turk St. San Francisco 

PHONE PROSPECT 5610 



September 4, 1920 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



being entertained than is usually the case 
during the late summer and early fall 
months. 

Due to their far-seeing policy in at all 
times keeping a large surplus reserve of 
gasoline on hand, the Yosemite resort has 
experienced the biggest season in its history, 
it being even greater in volume than last 
year's record-breaking business. 
* * n> 

These are the "Indian Summer" months 
for the High Sieiras and touring conditions 
are ideal as far as weather and scenery is 
concerned. The Tioga Road, linking the 
Yosemite country with Lake Tahoe, has been 
reported in excellent condition by Wallace 
B. Curtis, associate manager of Camp Curry, 
who has just completed the Yosemite to San 
Francisco trip via this route. 

Sfc t{. tfi 

A. C. Robbins, of Greer-Probbins Com- 
pany, Hupmobile and LaFayette distributors, 
and vice-president of the Los Angeles Speed- 
way Association, paid San Francisco a visit 
a few days ago following a vacation spent 
with his family at Del Monte. Robbins is 
enthusiastic over the prospects for the 
Thanksgiving Day classic at the Beverly 
Hills Speedway. This will be the deciding 
event of the year's racing calendar and will 
attract the greatest pilots of the country. It 
is probable that the Americrn team to com- 
pete in the 1921 Grand Prix in France will 
be picked at the conclusion of this great 
event of the racing world, he believes. 

Lawrence Barrett and Frank D. Keefe 
have taken over the garage of Dow & Green, 
on Taylor street, between O'Farrcll and 
Geary streets, and it is now known as the 
"Bohemian Garage." The prices are reason- 
able, and no garage could be more con- 
veniently located than this one. The motorist 
cannot do better than patronize Barrett c< 
Keefe. 



EMPIRE 

By G. M. Cookson 

Some for lone seas, lone stars, and lawless 
sail, 

For war's red sting that stabs the battle- 
smoke. 

For the green lordship of an English vale. 

For Fortune's favors or her fatal stroke; 

And all in blindness, on the roaring loom. 

Warp of waste waters, the winged shuttles 
hurled. 

Wove for a season's freight an age's doom. 
And captive in the toils held half the world. 
And now. when in the lordly vessel's wake 
The bubble. Glory, glistens far behind. 
We with our better selves deep counsel take. 
Our sovereignty the service of mankind. 
And this the proudest trophy we can show. 
Justly to yield and greatly to forego. 

— Westminster Gazette. 



Lieutenant Dan Sylvester, head of the San 
Francisco police department traffic bureau, 
is receiving congratulations by wire and 
letter from all over the country upon his re- 
election to the office of president of the 
National Traffic Officers convention, which 
convened in San Francisco last week. 

This organization is working to establish 
a uniform code of traffic regulations to take 
the place of the present crazy-quilt system, 
in which every State, and in some places, 
every county and town, has laws of its own 
differing in many respects from those that 
hold good a few miles away in the next 
county or municipality. 




Lieutenant Dan Sytvcitcr. 

Lieutenant Sylvester has worked untir- 
ingly in the interest of the National organi- 
zation and their legislative program ever 
since the first contention was held three 
years ago. and a large part of the results 
accomplished may be credited to his perse- 
\erence and hard work. 

Next year's convention will be held in 
Chicago. 



REAL ASSISTANCE 

"I have heard that your wife is of great 
\alue to you in your work." said the friend 
of the novelist. "I had no idea she was 
literary." 

"She isn't, but she never attempts to 
straighten out by desk." explained the 
novelist. — Judge. 



DR. WM. W. HOAGLAND 

DENTIST 

PERFECT SERVICE INSURES SATISFACTION 

Office., 908 Market St , Third Floor 

TELEPHONE GARFIELD 835 



SUMMONS 

No. 108559 

In the Superior Court of the State of California, 

in and for the City and County of San Francisco. 
Edward Craig, Plaintiff. 

vs. 
Julia Elizabeth Craig, Defendant. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the State 
of California in and for the city and County of San 
Francisco, and the complaint filed in the office of 
the County Clerk of said City and County. 

The People of the Slate of California send Greet- 
ing to Julia Elizabeth Craig, Defendant. 

You are hereby required to appear in an action 
brought against you by (he above-named plaintiff 
in the Superior Court of the Slate of California, 
in and for the City and County of San Francisco, 
and to answer the Complaint filed therein within ten 
days (exclusive of the day of service) after the 
service on you of this summons, if served within 
(he City and County; or if served elsewhere within 
thirty days. 

The said aclion is brought to obtain a judgment 
and decree of this Court dissolving the bonds of 
matrimony now existing between plaintiff and de- 
fendant, on the ground of defendant's extreme cruelty 
and desertion, also for general relief, as will more 
fully appear in the Complaint on file, to which 
special reference is hereby made. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you 
appear and answer as above required, the said 
Plaintiff will lake judgment for any money or 
damages demanded in the complaint as arising upon 
contract or will apply to the Court for any olhrr 
relief demanded in the Complaint. 

Given under my hand and the Seal of the 
Superior Court of the State of California, in and 
for the City and County of San I rancisco this 
28th day of July. A. D. 1020. 
(SmI) II. I. MUI .( Rl AY. Clerk. 

By L 1 Wl 1(11. Deputy Clerk. 
I \V Henderson. SOU Humhnldt Bank Bldg.. San 

FraacsKOi Cal.. Attorney for Plaintiff. 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIALTY 

'TliffTI 11 A m tO? p, TTt- 

548 Sacramento St., cor. leidaidorff 



U. S. GARAGE 
750 Bush St. Phone Garfield 713 

PEARSON GARAGE 

345 Bush St. Phone Douglas 2120 

Repair Shop and Annex 350 Bush St. 



Largest and Most Complete Garages in 
the West 



PI IMTHM PA17I?TFBTA ne ofarrell street 

LiLliNlUiN LiAFHrlEsKlA Oppcite Orphean. Theater 

Continue*!, 111 li^ from / A. M. to 8 P. M.— Mime. Lunch and Dinner Orcholral *ni Voral 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 4, 1920 




War-Time Control of Distribution of Food 
Efficiency and economy in food distribu- 
tion is one of the most important factors 
affecting the High Cost of Living, and Mr. 
Merritt's new book dealing with this subject 
should prove of great interest to the public 
at large. The volume presents a brief 
history of the Distribution Division of the 
United States Food Administration, but the 
author touches upon various other divisions 
of the food administration, for the work of 
each department was so closely related to 
every other that a description of one would 
be inadequate without mention of the others. 
Mr. Merritt, however, deals chiefly with the 
relation of the Distribution Division to the 
main Food Administration program. He em- 
phasizes particularly the zeal and co-opera- 
tion which made possible the splendid results 
obtained. As the author says. "We would 
also call attention to the fact that in this 
brief statement it is impossible to give special 
credit to individuals for their part in the 
activity of this division. All worked to- 
gether. All spent their days and part of 
their nights pondering over the vexing prob- 
lems presented. In almost all cases the net 
results were produced by combining the 
ideas and views of all, and the fact that a 
certain individual was in charge of a section 
of the division does not mean that the 
acti\ity of that section can be entirely at- 
tributed to the staff as a whole, as all were 
con